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Getting the right temperatures on resting

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

If we say we got 1 steak that is 2 inches thick (300g) and one roast approximately 2000g. The aim is medium-well. 

We start with the steaks. 

 

This steaks are not room tempered, straight from the fridge, and sear them quickly on 

a hot pan on both sides. then into the oven. We say the oven temperature is on 200 degrees Celsius. And if we

pull it out at 50 Celsius, how many degrees will it climb up to?  And how long resting time would it need until you plate it? 

Would it matter a lot if it was room tempered before putting on the pan, or should i take it out from the oven at 45 Celsius intstead"if room tempered?

 

 

And if we do the same process with the roast, will the roast climb up more in temperature than the steak?

 

 

I just want to point out that i would never finish a steak or roast in those temperatures at home, i would rather do it on around 120 degrees Celsius.Its more for work, where we always have the oven on 200 degree Celsius. And everyone at my work finish off the medium-well to well done steaks on the grill, and they usually look cremated. And soon or eventually we will start to finish of steaks in the oven. 

 

Would be nice if anyone have some expertise in this area! 

post #2 of 3

Cooking steaks and roasts by temperature and not time will always give you the same results.

Yes, a room tempered steak will cook faster then one right out of the cooler.

Resting a roast or steak allows for the temperature increase but, carry over depends on the temperature of the oven and time it was in.

 

Again cooking steaks and roasts by time is not as efficient as by temperature.

post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Of course you have right, but It's kinda time consuming to use a thermometer under service. The reason for why I asked about the roast was; I did a rump roast in the bbq, and it was about 200+Celsius, and I took it out, when it was at 57. But after resting it was 65+, and I did not want it to go any further because I wanted it a little bit pink . So I carved it so it could cool down, but it would probably gon up to over 70+ .

So next time when I do a rump roast or similar in bqb (200), I will bring it out when it reach 50 Celsius, if I want it to be medium.
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