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Good Shoes, But Legs & Feet Are Sore

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I work in a kitchen for 8-9 hours a day with 30 minutes lunch.  I have no problem during the early part of the day, but come the end of dinner service, my feet and legs start aching.  

 

My orthopedic doctor had custom orthotics made for me to place in my shoes.  The stiff arch support really hurt, even after I wore them for short periods during the day to break them in or "get used" to them, per doctor's instruction, but they felt like they were pressing so hard against my arches, I thought they were actually bruising them.  Every night, I was going home with severe pain in my aches, legs, and feet.  

 

One night, I had enough torture, so I removed the custom orthotics and replaced them with Dr. Scholl's work shoe gels.  I placed two inside each shoe and that took care of the foot and arch pain, however, my calves are still a bit sore and my feet just a bit achey.  

 

Is there anything someone can suggest that would totally erase all aches and pain?  I love, love, love my job and want to come home without foot or leg pain/aches.  The rest of my body feels great, despite a long day on my feet.  Will this eventually stop?

 

 

Shoe Brand:  Dansko:  $135 - Non-skid, chef shoes

 

Thanks for your suggestions.


Edited by Etherial - 5/27/15 at 8:53am
post #2 of 9

     It's unlikely you will ever go home without some soreness. That's the nature of standing on your feet all day. You should relate the dr. Scholl's story to your doctor. That sounds like info he/she should know. Adjustments may need to be made to your orthotics. 

     Overall I'd say just keep working on it. Your body will adjust but in the meantime do what you can. 

Remember feet should be shoulder width apart as standard practice. Leaning on one foot or the other seems good in the moment but really just wears you out quicker. Extra weight and poor posture are also culprits. 

     But even thin, perfect posture individuals who practice good standing techniques and don't have inherent foot problems eventually get tired legs and feet after a long day at work. I'm pretty sure that's why the whirlpool and beer were invented.  

post #3 of 9

ask you doctor again about your orthotics. Arch support and a deep heal cup are very important. You may also want to look into support stockings.

post #4 of 9

I've been wearing custom orthotics for about 15 years now.

 

1) Yes, the orthotics will need about 2-3 weeks to "get used to"  You will also experience discomfort on your knees and possibly hips.  Remember, the orthotic supports your foot, and any slight change in your foot will affect other joints.

 

2) The best fitting orthotic is--and still is-- to make a plaster cast of your foot.  If measurements for your foot were made by walking over a pad or some other method, the fit of the resulting orthotic will be lousy.

 

3) You need good shoes to support the orthotic.  Grasp our shoe by the heel and with yor other hand, grasp the shoe mid-sole and twist, if there is moderate flex it's no good-  The orthotic needs a stable shoe that doesn't flex laterally, if the shoes does, the orthotic will rock within the shoe and you won't be a happy camper.

 

Hope this helps

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

My shoes are professional grade shoes, made for the kitchen by Dansko.  My orthotics are hard; and I mean really hard.  There is no way I can wear them again.  I'm going to the store now to purchase a pair of anti-embolism stockings or support hose.  I'll also insert a small gel insert under each heel.  I'll see what happens tonight.

post #6 of 9

Glad to see you have finally found a kitchen home lol.

Get the stockings and inserts and 2 more pairs of shoes.

Then rotate.

This is probably the best advice ever given to me.

Worked all thru my nursing career as well as the kitchen.

 

Be glad you are not working the FOH and wearing heels every nite lol.

 

mimi

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone. I will be adding another gel heel support to each shoe. I've been on my feet for 12-15 hours, but that' including cooking at home and 10 hours, not 9, of work. This week, I'll be working 7 days straight, because I'm off this Fri, Sat, and Sunday for a wedding, and they don't have anyone else yet to fill a third position, so I took the extra hours; I won't relinquish my free time any time soon after this; too much.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etherial View Post

My shoes are professional grade shoes, made for the kitchen by Dansko.  My orthotics are hard; and I mean really hard.  There is no way I can wear them again.  I'm going to the store now to purchase a pair of anti-embolism stockings or support hose.  I'll also insert a small gel insert under each heel.  I'll see what happens tonight.


Of course the orthotics hurt, you've never worn them before. Muscles are what support your foot arch. When they fail, like mine did, you have to prop the muscle back to it's original position, this is one of the tasks of the orthotic. Your soles are soft and tender, and will need "toughening up" when they are in contact with the orthotic. My orthotics are carbon fiber, many are rigid plastic, but you can't have flexible materials to support your body weight, the orthotic has to be rigid.

One of the things about being on your feet for longer than 10hrs a day is that your lower back will start to hurt, especially in the mornings. A lot of this is due to your hamstrings not being stretched enough. Bending over and touching your toes is hard on your back. What Ive been doing every night and every morning is the same stretch, but easier on your back: Lie on the floor facing a door frame, scoot your butt so it touches the frame, and stretch one leg upright along the frame, and the other leg flat on the floor, switch legs and repeat a few times.

This exercise lets me see my chiropracter only once a month instead of every week, and I'm about the same age as you
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 9

I forgot about the doorway technique.  I have a habit of always bending down to pick up pennies. A coworker recently asked  why I bother. I said it's because I bend over to pick up pennies so I know I still can. Stretching and some easy yoga also help. 

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