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Looking for a new knife.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
hey guys, looking for advise on a new chefs knife. I currently use a shun classic 8 inch but I am now looking for something bigger. I use my knife for everything from cleaning salmon to dicing dense root veg such as celeriac. Also would prefer it to be less high maintenance. Price range under 300.

What do you think guys??
post #2 of 17
Shun classic (and Premeir) can be bought in 10 inch length. That two inches bigger is significant.

What are you finding to be "high maintenance"? Knowing that helps with further advise.
post #3 of 17

My Hiromoto AS 270 is a real work horse and you can still get them if you look.  They run a little short so a 270 is in your ball park.

post #4 of 17
I like my Hiromoto AS 270 a lot. A workhorse indeed. The same maker has produced the stainless NS-10 which is a bit thinner behind the edge, wider and quite a bit lighter. Exists also in a 240mm version.
post #5 of 17

Here's my Hiro 270 AS against my 10" Goodell

 

post #6 of 17
Not Japanese, but...

post #7 of 17

Forgies are hard to beat.  Excellent steel with a fairly high heat treat and a killer profile.  I usually convert them to Wa, but this last one I made an improved handle on the stock tang.

 

 

Wa conversions -

 

post #8 of 17
Nice handles. I hope to rescale mine in fancy wood someday. So far my total investment in that project is $75.
post #9 of 17

It's a fun rabbit hole -

post #10 of 17
What do I need for the conversion process? Bench grinder? do you have any pictures of the tang before you insert the handle?
post #11 of 17

270 Hiromoto NS-10 is one of the better bargains going on now..  Stainless, no faux damacus or decals to concern yourself with, nice and thin behind the edge, unlike your Shun Classic, will fall through what was a struggle for the latter.  Better steel and a killer price.

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Hiromoto.html#Hiromoto

 

You could pay $300 and get something even better, but it's my bed time now so I'll sleep on that for now.  Are you open to carbon?

 

 

Rick

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

What do I need for the conversion process? Bench grinder? do you have any pictures of the tang before you insert the handle?

 

I had a nice metal cutting band saw at my old job, but I did a lot of work on the grinder and belt sander.  Just have to keep it cool with water.  Not a Forgecraft, but another vintage blade I converted.  I draw the profile then work out the conversion on paper, transfer that to tape and go to work.

 

 

 

 

I use the same pattern to work out the handle.  I grind in a choil and machi on conversions.

post #13 of 17

Nice!  I have one to try right now, just took the old handle off.  We should stop talking about old dirty carbons though.  Bidding is already too competitive on ebay hehe.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hey! Thanks for the response guys. I'm not apposed to carbon. I did however buy a knife that was blue Steel recently and that required far two much constant care for use at the work place. Imo. So that is what I meant by "high maintenance"
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZacTaylor View Post

I did however buy a knife that was blue Steel recently and that required far two much constant care for use at the work place

 

Do you mean edge touch up, or constant wiping dry?  Blue paper steel should take and hold a very keen edge through many services with just a quick stropping at the end of your shift.

 

Wiping the blade clean and dry is just the nature of the beast.  

post #16 of 17
Even at home I find the wiping and drying part to be a challenge but as you say, this the beasts nature and I'm ok with that.
post #17 of 17
Once a patina has installed you should treat it as any other steel, so-called stainless as well. Wipe of after any use, and wash and dry before putting it away.
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