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What are odd foods you grew up on? - Page 4

post #91 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper Grind View Post

C
Curious too. Was thinking maybe cilantro?

Thank you for guessing but no, nothing green.. Was a puréed creamy light orange soup but the flavor was spectacular. Think the housekeeper said something about an oxtail broth? We were served a lot of traditional foods like Ackee with salt fish, breadfruit, jerk, that kind of thing, so I'm hoping that its traditional too and able to be remade.
post #92 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by berndy View Post
 

I grew up in Southern Germany and there are lots of foods most of you never heard of like

 

Buckling  Romadur , Briegel , Zwiebelkuchen , Maultaschen , Pftzauf ,Dampfnudel  , Laubfrosch , Gaisburger Marsch ,Sperrknecht or Schlanganker , Blutwurst ,Siedfleisch , Kalbshaxe ,Saure Kutteln,

Bubespitzle, Faedlesuppe..Wurstsalat,Ofenschlupfer,

 

I just wish Oma would cook for me again.

Yes, yes, yes... My kinda food :) Some local differences due to Northern Bavaria here, but still, yes.... :)

post #93 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper Grind View Post

I would love to hear about odd foods you grew up on. Is there something in your grocery basket that others ask you about or cringe at in disgust?

Does it embarrass you, or do you get a secret thrill in defending it almost to the point of bragging?

Looks like the original query was edited.  Nothing in my grocery basket (growing up or otherwise) that others asked about, cringed at in disgust, embarrassed me, I needed to defend or brag about..

 

What others might or might not be familiar with that I grew up on/with - Kishke/stuffed derma (intestines), chopped liver (pretty common now), rugalach (rolled cookie), gefilte fish with borscht or beets and horseradish, bialies (from the bakery) with smoked salmon/lox & cream cheese, and jelly donuts from the bakery - on a Saturday or Sunday morning.  In my grandmother's house, no cooking was allowed after sundown on Friday night.  There were many "traditional" foods, especially on Holidays, but can't remember them all. Also, grew up with Eggcreams (in NYC candy stores), wax lips and Mary Jane candy.  Too many to name. 

post #94 of 106

My mother ate the soft ends of chicken bones (except the hip joint which has a funny texture and flavor) and sucked/crushed out the marrow.  I was the only one in the family to copy her, still do it to this day.  Particularly nice from whole roasted chicken.

 

Caution - don't use your front teeth for this as they have a tendency to break through suddenly and you could chip them.

 

Turkey bones are nice for the marrow also but you really should break those with a hammer, and don't let the dog get any flying pieces, that can be very costly.

 

 

Rick

post #95 of 106
Headcheese. This was something that was huge in my family growing up and I despised every minute of it. Even just the site of it in a grocery store makes me want to hurl. Oh man getting forced to eat that was so rough, not something I miss from my years of youth!
post #96 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurenlulu View Post

Thank you for guessing but no, nothing green.. Was a puréed creamy light orange soup but the flavor was spectacular. Think the housekeeper said something about an oxtail broth? We were served a lot of traditional foods like Ackee with salt fish, breadfruit, jerk, that kind of thing, so I'm hoping that its traditional too and able to be remade.

Awww, well I tried heehee. The combination of ingredients you mentioned seemed to pair well with pumpkin and cilantro in my imagination. Then I would probably just drown it in hot peppers, cause that's how I roll! 😎
post #97 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

Looks like the original query was edited.  Nothing in my grocery basket (growing up or otherwise) that others asked about, cringed at in disgust, embarrassed me, I needed to defend or brag about..

What others might or might not be familiar with that I grew up on/with - Kishke/stuffed derma (intestines), chopped liver (pretty common now), rugalach (rolled cookie), gefilte fish with borscht or beets and horseradish, bialies (from the bakery) with smoked salmon/lox & cream cheese, and jelly donuts from the bakery - on a Saturday or Sunday morning.  In my grandmother's house, no cooking was allowed after sundown on Friday night.  There were many "traditional" foods, especially on Holidays, but can't remember them all. Also, grew up with Eggcreams (in NYC candy stores), wax lips and Mary Jane candy.  Too many to name. 

Sorry about the edits. I hope it didn't interrupt your reply. I sometimes have problems with the site or realize I should have proofread better before submitting.

Thanks for reminding me about smoked salmon! Market nearby serves it, but instead of cream cheese, ontop of a croissant roll with a creamy mustard dill spread. It is amazing!!

Did your borscht have the fish inside it, or on the side?
Edited by Pepper Grind - 6/29/15 at 1:51am
post #98 of 106
My dad used to scramble some sort of roe with eggs.
His mom back home in Virginia would send him cans of the stuff from time to time and I was the only kid out of 5 who would join him at the table.

Curious what sort of fish this roe was from.
I wonder if it is as good as I remember.

mimi
post #99 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post

My mother ate the soft ends of chicken bones (except the hip joint which has a funny texture and flavor) and sucked/crushed out the marrow.  I was the only one in the family to copy her, still do it to this day.  Particularly nice from whole roasted chicken.

Caution - don't use your front teeth for this as they have a tendency to break through suddenly and you could chip them.

Turkey bones are nice for the marrow also but you really should break those with a hammer, and don't let the dog get any flying pieces, that can be very costly.


Rick

My stepdad does the same thing. My mom will eat what she wants off the chicken, then hands the rest to him. You would be surprised to see how clean he can get those bones.

The closest I get to that is gnawing out as much of the tasty meat trapped between the bones of a turkey neck as possible after my mom made soup.
post #100 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

My dad used to scramble some sort of roe with eggs.
His mom back home in Virginia would send him cans of the stuff from time to time and I was the only kid out of 5 who would join him at the table.

Curious what sort of fish this roe was from.
I wonder if it is as good as I remember.

mimi
I'll admit I have never considered the pairing of fish with egg. My mind has been trained to just automatically go to pork.
post #101 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Oliver View Post

Headcheese. This was something that was huge in my family growing up and I despised every minute of it. Even just the site of it in a grocery store makes me want to hurl. Oh man getting forced to eat that was so rough, not something I miss from my years of youth!
We didn't do the head cheese, but we did do pigs feet jelly which name sounds equally as appetizing. The first time I tried it I couldn't decide whether I loved or hated it so I kept eating it to get off the fence. I suppose I grew to embrace the charm of the weird texture.

One thing I learned after buying some recently though, I can't stomach it unless it has vinegar.
post #102 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pepper Grind View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

My dad used to scramble some sort of roe with eggs.
His mom back home in Virginia would send him cans of the stuff from time to time and I was the only kid out of 5 who would join him at the table.

Curious what sort of fish this roe was from.
I wonder if it is as good as I remember.

mimi
I'll admit I have never considered the pairing of fish with egg. My mind has been trained to just automatically go to pork.

This was not so much a fish and egg pairing...
If I remember correctly this dish had an earthy note.
The flavor stood out against the blandness of the salt and pepper seasoned eggs without being over assertive.
Hard to explain as it has been 40 + years lol.

I have, from time to time, gone on the lookout for canned fish roe (the sacks were maybe 4-6 inches in length) but as yet have been unsuccessful.
Maybe someone will see this and help me come up with species or brand.

mimi
post #103 of 106

If we went fishing early and came back with perch my grandmother would remove the roe sacks whole and gently cook them like sausages.  We would have that, fried whole perch and pancakes for breakfast.  I still save the roe from fresh caught fish - smoked Striper roe is delicious.

post #104 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
 

If we went fishing early and came back with perch my grandmother would remove the roe sacks whole and gently cook them like sausages. 


Now that must be a very very nutritious food!!

I would never had thought of that.  I used to fish for perch with my Grandpa (Fond memories). He taught me how to prepare them.  He would discard the roe though but If I do that again I would keep that. Great idea!

Thanks

 

Roe is densely packed with nutrition.  My lobster bisque requires 2 male and 2 female lobsters.  I use the roe from the females to colour the bisque.

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #105 of 106

I didn't grow up with any unusual foods: we ate... snails... frog legs... lamb brains.... tripes.... hearts, livers, gizzards... the usual standard fare! :lol: 

post #106 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post
 

My lobster bisque requires 2 male and 2 female lobsters.  I use the roe from the females to colour the bisque.

 

Luc H.

 

We call it the Coral and it's delicious just like the Tomalley is as well.  You know a real lobster lover when they chow down on the green stuff.  :thumb:

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