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Looking for knife suggestions!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hey guys originally this thread was for a cutting board, however I just changed it!

I bought a 7" and 4" Shun premier Santoku and paring knife with the Shun Premier Honing rod which I will be returning to get something better. 

Let me know what you think I should get!

 

Another option (If possible): Use the Shun honing rod on all my knives, Keep the Shun Santoku (I got it for 95$), and get another Japanese knife that could be a nice addition to the Santoku, It would have to be one that I am able to use on the harder foods. Or am I destined to get a german knife for the harder foods? And then I would replace the paring knife too.

 

                                                             Knife Suggestion Criteria - Post 11

 

I am looking for some suggestions on what japanese knives and honing rod I should get.

 

Size: ~7" Santoku or Gyuto (Any all purpose knife) and a 4" Petty knife.

Goal: Would like the edge to resist chipping as well as possible and retain its sharpness for as long as possible with regular honing. And a wood handle. 

Sharpening: I do plan to get them professionally sharpened once a year, if there is a more expensive knife that would need to be sharpened substantially less, it would be great to know.

 

Left handed: I am left handed, is it in my best interest to buy only left handed knives?

 

Honing rod: I have the Shun Premier honing rod, I could return that as well. I would prefer one that has a wooden handle and can mount on my knife magnet. 

 

 

Me: I will be using these knives at least 2X daily for hopefully the rest of my life. I am only using them for 1~3 people though. I want these 2 knives to last forever and can wait/save up if I need to increase my budget. I have given a lot of thought about getting something bigger than 7" and my reasoning for staying with 7" is that my cutting board is only 14"X9" and I do have relatively small hands.

 

Budget: Let's be reasonable here and try to keep it under ~250 per knife, I am under the impression it might not be worth the extra money after that. If there is something that makes the 400$ knife truly that much better I would be interested. On the flip side, if I don't have to pay 250$ to get the same knife, I would rather not.

 

Where to buy: Right now I am looking at JKI and CKTG anyplace is welcome!

 

THANKS!

 

 

 

 

 

Hey,

 

I just bought a couple VG-10 steel knives and want to get a good cutting board to make sure the knives don't chip and stay as sharp as long as possible. I can't post a link to the item I want to get however it is made of Sheesham wood and can be found at amazon under the name architec gripperwood sheesham.

 

If anyone could let me know if this wood is soft enough and good for knives it would be great.

 

Thanks!


Edited by thatknifeguy - 6/14/15 at 7:21am
post #2 of 14
Sheesham sheesham by the seashore. Also known as indian rosewood. Never hears of it used in a cutting board. I like tight end grain hardwoods like northern maple.
post #3 of 14
Martha sells them

I like end grain maple too and never chipped a vg- ten on one.
post #4 of 14

I have never heard of this wood, no high-end maker is using it, and certainly if they did they would not show the apparent knots I see in it.  End-grain is the best, and BoardSmith makes the best of the best.  Maple, Cherry and  Walnut are what typically get used, Cherry is the lightest and softest and is perfectly fine for home use, Maple is what you want in high-traffic areas.

 

You can use edge grain also, in the approved woods above, (no acacia or teak, they are abrasive) it's a lot cheaper and doesn't require the same extent of meticulous craftsmanship to make it resistant to splitting as with end-grain.

 

But if you often find yourself really pumping through the volume with abandon then the end-grain is worth the extra bucks.  This would also be true if you have your knives sharpened to very acute angles.

 

 

Rick

 

Edit note:  There were no comments yet submitted when I began writing.  And so poof!, the mystery of Sheesham is revealed before I know whatup.  Happened in a matter of minutes, what adverse synchronicity.


Edited by Rick Alan - 6/13/15 at 3:17pm
post #5 of 14
The only thing I've ever seen that wood used for is furniture. Like at Pier 1 or world market. Not used much in Western world furniture that I know of.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank you guys for all the input! I ended up getting a end grain maple board from a local Wood-maker!

 

I have a 7" Shun Premier Santoku and a 4" Premier Paring knife. Seeing as how these are VG-10 and delicate I was thinking I should get german chef knife for the tougher jobs.

 

Do you guys have any suggestions?

 

I was leaning towards the Wusthof 6" Ikon Chef knife Classic. I am open to anything though, maybe an independent knife maker?

 

What do you guys think I should use to cut harder foods? 

 

Thanks again! Good thing I didn't get the furniture cutting board

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

I have never heard of this wood, no high-end maker is using it, and certainly if they did they would not show the apparent knots I see in it.  End-grain is the best, and BoardSmith makes the best of the best.  Maple, Cherry and  Walnut are what typically get used, Cherry is the lightest and softest and is perfectly fine for home use, Maple is what you want in high-traffic areas.

 

You can use edge grain also, in the approved woods above, (no acacia or teak, they are abrasive) it's a lot cheaper and doesn't require the same extent of meticulous craftsmanship to make it resistant to splitting as with end-grain.

 

But if you often find yourself really pumping through the volume with abandon then the end-grain is worth the extra bucks.  This would also be true if you have your knives sharpened to very acute angles.

 

 

Rick

 

Edit note:  There were no comments yet submitted when I began writing.  And so poof!, the mystery of Sheesham is revealed before I know whatup.  Happened in a matter of minutes, what adverse synchronicity.

post #7 of 14
Avoiding chips may have more to do with good knife skills than anything else. But good for you getting a nice board; you won't regret it one iota. When you get a German chef knife, get at least 8 inch... Six is just too short and more of a utility knife than a chef knife.
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

 

This is going to sound crazy, but I am actually coming from having used only a cheap serrated steak knife for everything over the past few years. 

 

Do you think it is going to be inevitable that I chip or "abuse" my first Japanese knife?

 

The reason I ask is because I can still return my Shun Premier knives (I haven't used them yet due to not having a proper cutting board) and having browsed these forums I feel like I should be getting something like this: http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kasa16.html instead. 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Avoiding chips may have more to do with good knife skills than anything else. But good for you getting a nice board; you won't regret it one iota. When you get a German chef knife, get at least 8 inch... Six is just too short and more of a utility knife than a chef knife.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Avoiding chips may have more to do with good knife skills than anything else. But good for you getting a nice board; you won't regret it one iota. When you get a German chef knife, get at least 8 inch... Six is just too short and more of a utility knife than a chef knife.

Thanks!

 

I am actually coming from having only used a serrated steak knife for everything over the past few years. 

 

Do you think it is going to be inevitable that I chip or "abuse" my first Japanese knife?

 

The reason I ask is because I can still return my Shun Premier knives (I haven't used them yet due to not having a proper cutting board) and having browsed these forums I feel like I should be getting something like "Kanehiro AS Santoku 165mm" from Chef Knives To Go, or something from Japan Knives Imports.

 

Also, I am left handed. I see some knives are available at a steep mark up for left handed people, would it be in my best interest to get one of these?

 

Thanks for all the help everyone!

post #10 of 14
I would certainly return the Shun and get a fully left-biased Masahiro Virgin Carbon of 240mm or a Misono, but their left-biased are available on special order only.
post #11 of 14
I've been using Shun for many years and the only chip I've ever had was when I dropped it on a ceramic tile floor. If you don't do something like that I would not think chips are inevitable or anything to fear.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys! I am going to be returning the Shuns, the Masahiro is on the list.

 

I am looking for some suggestions on what japanese knives and honing rod I should get.

 

Size: ~7" Santoku or Gyuto (Any all purpose knife) and a 4" Petty knife.

Goal: Would like the edge to resist chipping as well as possible and retain its sharpness for as long as possible with regular honing. And a wood handle. 

Sharpening: I do plan to get them professionally sharpened once a year, if there is a more expensive knife that would need to be sharpened substantially less, it would be great to know.

 

Left handed: I am left handed, is it in my best interest to buy only left handed knives?

 

Honing rod: I have the Shun Premier honing rod, I could return that as well. I would prefer one that has a wooden handle and can mount on my knife magnet. 

 

 

Me: I will be using these knives at least 2X daily for hopefully the rest of my life. I am only using them for 1~3 people though. I want these 2 knives to last forever and can wait/save up if I need to increase my budget. I have given a lot of thought about getting something bigger than 7" and my reasoning for staying with 7" is that my cutting board is only 14"X9" and I do have relatively small hands.

 

Budget: Let's be reasonable here and try to keep it under ~250 per knife, I am under the impression it might not be worth the extra money after that. If there is something that makes the 400$ knife truly that much better I would be interested. On the flip side, if I don't have to pay 250$ to get the same knife, I would rather not.

 

Where to buy: Right now I am looking at JKI and CKTG anyplace is welcome!

 

THANKS!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Benuser View Post

I would certainly return the Shun and get a fully left-biased Masahiro Virgin Carbon of 240mm or a Misono, but their left-biased are available on special order only.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

I've been using Shun for many years and the only chip I've ever had was when I dropped it on a ceramic tile floor. If you don't do something like that I would not think chips are inevitable or anything to fear.

Edited by thatknifeguy - 6/14/15 at 7:12am
post #13 of 14

Return the honing rod as well. A rod is an emergency tool in a pro environment. It redresses an edge that has failed, and returns an even weaker edge. Fatigued steel should be abraded, not used for a redressed edge. Use  your finest stone instead for a few edge trailing -- stropping -- strokes,  and if that doesn't work instantly, go to the second finest.

post #14 of 14
Don't throw out your serrated steak Knife. Good luck with whatever you choose to do!
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