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Pulled pork overnight? - Page 2

post #31 of 55

I think we should all show our butts off! This is from about 2 weeks ago. Smoked with applewood.

 

post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

BBQ was mentioned only once in this thread, most likely in error. We've all been talking roasted or stewed pulled pork.

How was it in error? Please clarify. 

post #33 of 55
Jake, I don't think MaryB meant to imply that anything we have been discussing has anything to do with smoking meat. I might be wrong but that's what I was thinking.

I know I prefer real BBQ to oven-roasted or crockpot pulled pork but sometimes that's just not the easiest to make happen.
post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post

You have a point or were you just being snarky?

Not snarky.
post #35 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

BBQ was mentioned only once in this thread, most likely in error. We've all been talking roasted or stewed pulled pork.

I mentioned BBQ, What are you gonna do about it? It wasn't in error either. Which ever way you want to take it, verb or noun. I never make a mistake!!:lol:

If ya ask me, which nobody did, I think if your going to rub your meat, Brian, then slow cook it, then pull it and have barbque sauce and a mustard vinegar sauce to top it with, you're havin a BBQ.

Or, If you are going to slow roast something, no smoke,  pull it, have 20+ adults and a bunch of children around, and serve hot dogs, potato salad, cole slaw, etc. you are having a BBQ. NO?

It's 6 am and I just threw another couple of pieces of white oak in the smoker. Deciding whether to make coffee or tackle a Shiner Lager Ryes and Shine:beer: Happy Fathers Day y'all!!!

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #36 of 55
Ha, some people are more picky than others about the word " BBQ". Who cares, right. If it tastes good eat or drink it! Happy Father's Day to all fathers.
post #37 of 55

Hey Brian,

catch a flight to Big D. By the time you arrive we should be ready to eat. Besides everything else, I'll have you try my favorite sandwich of all time.

Lightly smoked soft shells, shredded lettuce, my own version of Louie sauce, on cheap white bread. You have to give it a little smush to flatten it a little before eating.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #38 of 55
Quote:
Ha, some people are more picky than others about the word "BBQ". Who cares, right.

CLASSIC!!!

Just like the words "CHEF" and "COOK".

Just vocabulary words. LOL.




I'm not sayin' ... I'm just sayin'.
post #39 of 55
Are you being snarky or do you have a point. Ha ha ha

Glad to have made you chuckle today. You make me chuckle too. smile.gif
post #40 of 55

But if the pork evaporates enough will it just be pig wine? 

post #41 of 55
Someone asked about how I did things ... so here it is, as simply as I can:

I usually use a butt, as big as I can find, or as cheap as I can get; cheap trumping big. I cut it up into chunks, baseball size. I stab each chunk a coupla-3 times and jam in a garlic slice. I rub it down with rub seasoning and jam it into a zippy bag for between 3-4 hours. I make a simple braise liquid of 1-cup coffee and 2-shots of bourbon, a shot of apple-cider vinegar and a shot of honey. I pour out the pork chunks onto raised rack in a hotel pan. I seal it up with foil and shove it into a 300* oven for +/- 2 1/2 hours depending on how much pork and/or how much other stuff is in the oven. Out it comes and it rests until it is cool enough to not burn my delicate hands. While I'm ripping apart the meat I reduce the liquid from the pan. I pour on enough liquid into the pulled meat to get it all just wet, not at all dripping, leaning to the less wet side. Back it goes into a screaming hot oven give-or-take 550* for maybe half an hour. Mix it up and serve.
post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post

Are you being snarky or do you have a point. Ha ha ha

Glad to have made you chuckle today. You make me chuckle too. smile.gif

Now it just sounds like you're mocking me. Ha ha ha

post #43 of 55

How did it go? I make an overnight pork butt that starts a 475 then gets turned way down to 200 and roasts slowly overnight. It is divine but it is a PITA to clean the pan afterwords because of the sugar in the marinade. It pools in the corners and turns into a substance resembling thick glass. Still, so worth it to wake up to the smell of slowly roasted pork.

post #44 of 55

Smoker or oven, the idea is the same 275 the whole way.  Well one caveat: other than the smoke flavor, my smoker also is more humid than the oven.  My rule is to leave it uncovered until I like the bark and color.  Then I wrap it so the bark doesn't get more dried out or darker.  For bone in butts, I don't even check the internal temperature anymore.  Temperature is just one data point wherever you stick the thermometer at one point in time.  If the probe goes in easy and the bone wiggles around easy, it's done.

post #45 of 55
Thread Starter 
It was incredible. I'll post pics when I'm near my computer. What I know is there is no one right way and since pork butt is so easy to work with it's hard to go wrong if you have even the least bit of experience.

I rubbed it generously and put it in a deep pan, uncovered at 450 for about an hour. It got a beautiful color. Then I covered it and left it in there for 5 hrs at 325. I let it rest covered in its juices for 2 hrs. My meat claws made an easy job of shredding, it took minutes. I stirred in the sauce (yellow mustard, cider vinegar and cayenne) and splashed in some pan juices. It was fantastic.

On the other hand it wasn't too enthusiastically received by the New Yorkers. They ate it but they thought it was weird. Gawd how I hate New Yorkers sometimes. But take my word, I grew up on this stuff and it was good! I'm not wasting this talent on them again lol.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #46 of 55

Sounds fantastic... congratulations.  I totally agree that there is no one way!

 

One other thing that is interesting is that there is a HUGE diversity in how served and sauced. That seem to cause some folks to balk - simple lack of familiarity. In my family they tend to like it chopped and with sweet tomato/molasses sauce. I like it spicier and thinner, but not just vinegar and cayenne. I'm intrigued by mustard sauce but that is so far out of my experience that I'm even afraid to try without having someone show me what's right and what's wrong. When serving a crowd I tend to shred and hold in the meat juice, then chop (if they insist) and sauce when making the sandwiches or plating. I also tend to have several styles of sauce available. A bit of the "have it your way" approach.

 

Now I'm hungry and having a conflict: pulled pork or a brisket. I'm wanting one or the other... and quite possibly both!

post #47 of 55
KK ... You've just experienced a regular standard drill. People from any given region are used to, and expect, particular things to be prepared a certain way. As examples I'll give you ribs and chili. Sauce or no sauce (dry or wet ribs); beans or no beans. That is just the way it is. Being from Chicagoland I could explain to you all about those poor people that just don't appreciate real pizza. And nobody ... nobody puts ketchup on a hot-dog.
post #48 of 55

The only thing more polarizing than BBQ is chili haha

post #49 of 55
Thread Starter 

Yes polarizing.  NY has no BBQ tradition of its own.  There are a few BBQ places that have sprung up in recent years but I find them to be mostly trendy - furnished with reclaimed wood, drinks in mason jars and sporting rockabilly bands as entertainment.  It's all a bit contrived in the middle of the city. It's a mish mosh of different types of BBQ and mostly you'll find unseasoned meat with an assortment of sauces so there is nothing really authentic or specific.  @BrianShaw if you've never had NC style mustard sauce give it a try on at least a sandwich.  It's tangy, but not sweet at all. My sauce is really simple, 1 part mustard to 1 part cider vinegar and a bit of cayenne.  Others make it more complex and add sugar but I stick to my simple recipe.

 

@IceMan I recently heard someone say that ketchup goes on hot dogs because hot dogs are pork and pork loves sweet toppings.  Nah I don't buy it, real hot dog lovers wouldn't be caught dead with ketchup and I'll stick to that.

 

The pulling

The pan juice

 

All dressed with mustard sauce

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #50 of 55

24 hours at 185 for a pork butt.  No spices at all.  Just remember to shut the oven off and turn it back on right before bed.  Most ovens have a 12 hour shut-off timer.  You do not want to start it at noon, have it cut out at midnight, and find a cold gummy piece of pork in the morning.

post #51 of 55

For sauce I prefer 50/50 ketchup/cider vinegar, red pepper flake to taste. Simmer until the heat comes out form the pepper flake then off the heat I add a good sized hunk of butter and mix in to thicken.

post #52 of 55

Growing up in NY,  Bar-B-Que was a really big thing. Having a Bar-B-Que was more of a happening. It was a date set for everyone to get together outside. In the courtyard or sometimes even blocking the street off. Our hood was like the league of nations. All sorts of cooking apparatuses were set up.Our family usually supplied all the chicken, the German families always had 2 pits built and roasted suckling pigs, and warm German potato salad. The guy with the butcher shop would supply all the steaks (for adults only) burgers and franks for the kids. Our Jewish friends always brought brisket and chopped chicken livers, yum. It was an all day and night affair. Kegs of beer, A&W syrup bottles with soda.etc. games for kids, drinking for the adults. At nightfall, live music, just about all the adults played an instrument. Then kids in PJ's, watched movies shown against the side of a building and cardplaying/gambling for the men and gossiping for the women.

 

What the hell happened? These days I hardly know my neighbors.

 

btw  always mustard on a burger down here

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #53 of 55
In Massachusetts we had cook outs, but we used a barbeque grill.
post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

 And nobody ... nobody puts ketchup on a hot-dog.

 

There's a small place down in Midvale, JohnnieBeef's that does a  very  good   real  Chicago  dog.  I hate those days when I'm driving by at lunch time and can't stop due to having a passenger already or being late for my next pick up. And if you care about your car's upholstery, do NOT order a to go Italian Beef sandwich wet.

 

Butt back to the topic at hand. A pork shoulder is one of the most forgiving hunks of meat on the planet.  As one can see there are many ways to prepare it, and it is pretty hard to end up with an inedible product.

 

You know, I wonder if a challenge theme of specifically pork shoulder would work? A very specific ingredient, but used in so many ways in so many cultures.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #55 of 55
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