or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

onion rings

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm not a fan of most frozen onion rings since most are made from chopped onions, just walmart and Nathans are whole onions. Beer batter dipped are great but they seam a big hassle to make at home. Are they just dipped in the batter before going into the oil or breaded. What is the best onion to use, Sell me on doing this myself
post #2 of 12

I've never made onion rings at home but if I were to I would try a variety of onions in one sitting.  I'm curious how red onions would taste, but I'd also use vidalia and white onions too.  Why not?  It's not like you'll have to spend a lot of money lol.  Instinct tells me that chilling the onions in the fridge would make for better results.

 

I'd heat up my dutch oven filled halfway with peanut oil.  Then I'd experiment a little.  For some onions I would dip in milk and coat with seasoned flour and fry.  For the rest I'd make a beer batter.  Honestly I don't think this will be very hard.  Just make sure that you use a spider spatula to take them out and let them rest on a cookie sheet, not on paper towels.  Hit them with sea salt when they come out of the fryer.

 

And this is a general question for anyone that wants to answer.  I like how fried food tastes when it's on brown paper bag rather than paper towel.  Is there a product I can buy like a roll of paper bag so that I don't have to cut up lunch bags?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 12
White or yellow onions work best. Big ones. Batter versus breaking is a big debate, just like with fried clams. I like batter better. Dredge in flour, dip in batter , and fry on proper temp oil. If breading, 3stage breading and let rest before frying. Eat hot. Best with ketchup, bob, but if you can't gat that use catsup instead.
post #4 of 12
I make beer battered onion rings on my burger truck. Batter consists of two parts cornstarch to one part flour, with egg, beer baking powder, salt, granulated garlic, pepper granulated onion.
I use large yellow onions, flouring is not necessary, I didn't notice any difference.

Batter concistancy is key, can't be to thick or thin. Something that you just have to play with.
I fry at 300 to just set the batter, this will cook the onion with the carryover heat while cooling. Fry at 375 to finish. Drain, salt, serve immediately.
post #5 of 12

I know this is kind of "off topic" but over the years I've discovered that I prefer "Haystack" onions to battered onion rings.  Thinly sliced onions, dredged in a highly seasoned flour and fried.  Crispy, oniony goodness!!!!  I've had way too many poorly made, soggy onion rings.  I usually just avoid them nowadays, because so many places can't make them well.

post #6 of 12

@Pete

Those haystack onions are breaded or battered?

I can remember getting something like that at the state fair. I don't know how they did it but they came square, the size of a brick.

 

@chefbuba

Are your rings going to the fryer twice? once at 300, then again at 375?

 

@Koukouvagia

 

I use these, I think you will too

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00Q255R2I/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2CMGEC22X2TEP&coliid=I1Y22UIX3199MX

 

This roll is ok but bulky

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LNAINVY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2CMGEC22X2TEP&coliid=I3CEZO7Z6DV4NW

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #7 of 12

@panini  Haystack onions are merely dredged in flour.  Usually seasoned with salt, pepper, chili powder, etc. then fried.  The moisture from the onion makes the flour stick.  They do have a tendency to clump up so they need to be stirred while frying unless you are going for that brick look, which I've seen before.  Just pack a fryer basket with the onions (not too tightly), drop in the fryer and allow to fry without stirring at all.  They will come out brick shaped.  I prefer them loose though.  I know many places that used to top their steaks with Haystack onions, but I just like them as a side.  If they got the seasoning right then there's not even a need for a dipping sauce, although

post #8 of 12

I'm an onion ring fanatic but... alas, it's hard to find good ones in restaurants and hard to make good ones at home.  The many restaurants in the Texas-based Pappas chain make the best I've ever had.  There's a Pappadeaux Restaurant (Cajun-themed) near me in the Chicago area, and we go there regularly to restore our faith in humanity with onion rings and fried calamari.;)

 

There are dozens of Pappas operations in both Dallas and Houston:  Pappamia (Italian), Pappacito (Mexican) a well as Pappadeaux; there's Pappas Steak House, Pappas Seafood, and maybe some I've forgotten.

 

It would be worth a try to ask for onion rings if you go to any of these, even if they're not on the menu. And don't worry- whatever Papas shop you go to you will get a truly outstanding meal!

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #9 of 12

@panini...... After the first fry to set the batter and they have cooled, rings are held in the reach in until ordered then fried to order at 375 to crisp.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post
 

@panini  Haystack onions are merely dredged in flour.  Usually seasoned with salt, pepper, chili powder, etc. then fried.  The moisture from the onion makes the flour stick.  They do have a tendency to clump up so they need to be stirred while frying unless you are going for that brick look, which I've seen before.  Just pack a fryer basket with the onions (not too tightly), drop in the fryer and allow to fry without stirring at all.  They will come out brick shaped.  I prefer them loose though.  I know many places that used to top their steaks with Haystack onions, but I just like them as a side.  If they got the seasoning right then there's not even a need for a dipping sauce, although

I remember the brick look - Tony Roma's onion ring loaf.  Peel and eat.  They were sinfully delicious.  I like the tempura coating Japanese restaurants use for vegetables and shrimp, rather than pancakey or sandy breadcrumbs. 

post #11 of 12

i love onion rings and also make it myself ....

post #12 of 12

I'll eat whatever you make me, OP.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking