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Licensing and Laws Central Texas

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I'm starting my business plan for a food truck my family and I are starting and need to know if anyone has any information on all the laws and licensing in central Texas. If anyone has any experience with you I'd love your input. Thanks!

post #2 of 4

Where in central texas are you? Go to your county's health department's website and search for food handling licenses, food safety manager's licensing, and mobile vendor requirements. That'll get you started.

post #3 of 4
I do know there were some changes made to http://texascottagefoodlaw.com/Frequently-Asked-Questions during the last legislative session .
Have not really read the whole thing thru and don't know if your truck is eligible or not.

Some rules were relaxed ( I remember all the at home wedding cake ladies being really happy they could start delivering and setting up their event cakes legally) and a few new "safe" products were added.

Some of the law may benefit your fledgling enterprise but then again I don't know if you can pick and choose among the rules to follow.
(Such as the no HD inspection deal. If you have nothing to hide then why not let the peeps with the ph and culture swabs in to have a lookie loo...)

Sorry OT.

Just thought I would drop the info on the table for your edification lol.
Best of luck to you and your family....I do a lot of work for family and close friends during the winter holidays and we always have a great time lol.

mimi
post #4 of 4

@Katy Haas,

I have helped someone in the Austin area. This is pretty basic stuff. You just need to identify which jurisdiction you fall under. Your's may be Travis or McLennan, etc.

  The online site will usually have a description of what your needs are going to be. It's basically just a mobile restaurant as far as the guidelines go. DON'T GO BY WHAT YOU READ!! GET YOUR INFO DIRECTLY FROM AN AUTHORIZED INDIVIDUAL FROM THE DEPARTMENT BEFORE DOING ANYTHING.

Just some things I remember:

There needs to be a certified food service manager on site when the business is open. Sanitation is basically the same for trucks as is restaurants. Some counties are different from each other. I know in Travis, if you are going to be in one place for more than 2 hrs. you need a written notarized contract with a local business that provides a qualified restroom for truck employees.Your permit will reflect where you can park and for how long.You have to post if you're restricted or not. If you're going to hold hot foods you have to comply with the fire explosion safety standards. You can only provide single service items. You can't hold any foods outside the kitchen. You will need an agreement that is notarized with the owner of a central facility or base where you are going to prep your food. Basically you need to prep and produce foods from a licensed/inspected kitchen or an incubator type of operation.

There are many other items to consider. I assume there have been changes in the last 2 yrs.

  The health department will provide the info you need. I WOULD NOT SECOND GUESS ANYTHING when it come to requirements. They are there to help you, not inhibit you from operating. I WOULD DEFINATELY SUBMIT YOUR FINISH-OUT PLANS BEFORE YOU DO ANYTHING TO YOUR TRUCK OR BEFORE YOU BUY ONE, AND HAVE THEM SIGNED OFF ON IT.!! There is plenty more.

 

Hope all goes well with your venture. I'm around if you have other questions.  In Dallas.

I just want to add. I'M NOT TRYING TO KNOCK OR KEEP YOU FROM YOUR PLANS, but, The food trucks are popular now. It's like any other food establishment current/relevent or on TV, every wants one, and it looks so easy to own and operate. Fact is they are the same, if not more, of all the pressures of owning a restaurant or bakery and have basically the same failure rate. Most trucks require you to produce/prep on your time away from the truck and with your paper/money administrative work, It makes for a long day. The plus side is that you can sell a truck much easier that a brick and mortar. This is just my personal feeling and nothing more. I would not invest into any type of franchise. When it's all said and done, you basically buy a job. It's usually limiting. I have included some remarks that are not directed towards you but to any and all thinking about a venture.

Best of Luck!

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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