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Mayo - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

No offense, you know I like ya, BUT, use nasty olive oil in anything, it's going to be nasty.

Nasty is that jar of sugar called Miricle Whip.

We're sold on Hellmans because that's all we had and knew about.

 

A little h2o and some extra lemon juice, less EVOO. No clumping or thickening, no bitterness. EVOO has little acidity so you have to add some more.

The zen of mayo, evoo, no machines. Just a balloon whip and a large bowl. No frantic agitating, shaking, jumping up and down, plugging things in, spinning around.

Just a nice back and forth motion until it thickens a little. It's not meringue, it shouldn't peak.

 

I do however kinda like the citrus Hellmans, Mayonesa con jugo de Limon, it's nice for salads.


No offense taken. You know I like (respect) ya as well.

I tried and tried and never obtained a result I liked.  Not ready to pay $$ for super exclusive high quality EVOO just to try again.

 

Luc H.


Edited by Luc_H - 7/8/15 at 6:24pm
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post #32 of 41

The obvious difference to me between hand and machine whip is that by hand I do believe you will entrain more air.  This is going to have an oxidizing effect on the evo and that my break down the bitter elements.  Thanks for the tip on the extra water and added lemon Panini

 

 

Rick

post #33 of 41

@Rick Alan The way I've always understood it, coarse I may be completely off base, I'm sure Luc will explain it, the olive oil is made up of droplets of oil. . Regular OO can have a bitter taste, especially if it ages or you break up the droplets and they pass your buds.  EVOO has very tiny droplets of oil. If you sip some fresh EVOO the very tiny droplets pass over the buds whole, so there is no bitter taste.

When you make mayo with EVOO, the egg protein surrounds the tiny droplets which makes them stick to the water. Disclaimer!! I'm no chemist!

So I think that when you get physical with the mayo( stick blender, food processor, etc.) you break up those tiny droplets and this is what makes the bitter taste. The way I see it, I gently coerce all those little droplets into a semi homogenous state without breaking the tiny EVOO droplets.

I feel kinda dumb explaining it this way. but it makes sense to me.

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post #34 of 41

EVOO's bitter taste comes from the good stuff in the oil i.e. antioxidants like polyphenols.

So technically speaking the more bitter the oil the better (nutritious) it is.

http://www.oliveoilsource.com/article/if-oil-bitter-its-bad-its-fiction

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/08/05/olive-oil.aspx

 

Polyphenols are both soluble in water and oil. Our tongue,s taste buds can only taste bitter if it's dissolved in water (taste buds work with electrically charged and water soluble chemicals: sugar, salt, acid, bitter and umami).  The nose is how we actually taste aroma's and those must be water soluble volatile compounds. When OO is subject to strong emulsification with (water) vinager and lemon juice, the polyphenols are extracted from the oil and find themselves in the water phase which makes them (more easily, readily) detectable by our taste buds i.e. a bitter mayo.

 

Mayo is a water in oil emulsion i.e. suspended water droplets in an a continuous oil matrix. (orange juice is the reverse or an oil in water emulsion)

 

@panini by lightly beating your EVOO into an emulsion, your water droplets remain large in your oil matrix so the water surface exposed to oil by volume of water droplets is smaller than a tight emulsion (real small water droplets) made with a stick blender (like Hellmann's mayo).  A tight emulsion is usually more stable for storage in the fridge however it extracs more polyphenols in the water phase than loose emulsions because of the surface area of water is greater, hence will get more bitter.

 

A loose emulsion mayo made with EVOO clumps in the refrigerator and made with a blender it gets bitter.  I tried and tried but the reality is to make a good tasting mayo for me, which means clean tasting and that I can store in the fridge, I use a stick blender and neutral oil.

 

The (reality) bottom line is we both make the product we like to eat.

 

Luc H.

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post #35 of 41

I don't know, I make it the same way all the time. In fact it goes back to my uncles who owned restaurants and catering. I made some tuesday to make a quasi italian potato salad. No bitterness at all. Had the rest of the salad tonight, fine. Have some left in the ice box, not lumpy or bitter. I do double wrap it, placing the plastic right on the mayo and more over the container. I don't get it? I do use a large bowl and I make it pretty loose. I will take some pics with my phone the next time I make it. I'll also run some with cheap EVOO I have at the shop and use a machine and have someone taste test both.

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post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post


 

The zen of mayo, evoo, no machines. Just a balloon whip and a large bowl.

 

Indeed.

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post #37 of 41

Quote:

Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

The zen of mayo, evoo, no machines. Just a balloon whip and a large bowl.

 

1+ This.

Totally hear you and agree.

 

Zen chef - HD stock video clip

 

 

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post #38 of 41

Which neutral oil do you think is best?  I stay away from vegetable oils for health reasons and I'm looking for a neutral oil that I can use for making mayo.  I only have olive, coconut and peanut oil.

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post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Which neutral oil do you think is best?  I stay away from vegetable oils for health reasons and I'm looking for a neutral oil that I can use for making mayo.  I only have olive, coconut and peanut oil.

I like grapeseed oil. 

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Which neutral oil do you think is best?  I stay away from vegetable oils for health reasons and I'm looking for a neutral oil that I can use for making mayo.  I only have olive, coconut and peanut oil.


Peanut will work.

Safflower and avocado as well.

(canola, grapeseed, corn, soya are also all neutral tasting oils)

 

Luc H.


Edited by Luc_H - 7/9/15 at 1:43pm
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post #41 of 41
I never thought that the humble Mayo can create such a storm. Personally I prefer my own made Mayo. This way I know what is in the Mayo. Here in Australia we have Mayo from the supermarket with sugar in it. Some other Mayo looks like wall paper clue. No thank you. I use a stick blender. Eggs, fresh lemon juice, salt, pepper, Worcester sauce, blend it well, add canola or sunflower oil slowly to the mix until you have the right consistency. I use to work in big commercial kitchens and we made 20 litres of Mayo in less than 20 minutes. Refrigerated and in a closed tap your Mayo lasts for weeks. Because I don't use Mayo often, I make only about 500 grams and put the Mayo in to a clean glass container with a screw top. smile.gif
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