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Pasta extruder - request advice on which make / model

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I have a small farm, selling direct to the public. I would like to expand into producing pasta, using our own farm eggs. For this, I am looking into a pasta extruder machine.

 

I have read that many of the less expensive models have various problems (e.g. plastic dies breaking, motor too weak for thick doughs). I am prepared to pay more (e.g. few thousand dollars) for something which produces a quality product, with minimum issues. I do not need a large machine as my production will remain small (e.g. 10kg daily maximum), but quality and reliability are important. After this, naturally I do not want to pay more than necessary.

 

Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

 

Regards,

Douig

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougsfarm View Post

I have a small farm, selling direct to the public. I would like to expand into producing pasta, using our own farm eggs. For this, I am looking into a pasta extruder machine.

I have read that many of the less expensive models have various problems (e.g. plastic dies breaking, motor too weak for thick doughs). I am prepared to pay more (e.g. few thousand dollars) for something which produces a quality product, with minimum issues. I do not need a large machine as my production will remain small (e.g. 10kg daily maximum), but quality and reliability are important. After this, naturally I do not want to pay more than necessary.

Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

Regards,
Douig

Welcome to cheftalk, Doug.

I have an Imperia handcrank machine I bought years ago. I found the motorized model just didn't extrude the pasta. I like the Imperia because it has no motor, does what it's supposed to do, and simple to work with. You can make homemade pasta without a machine, by preparing the dough, and cutting the dough by hand. The motorized version was loud and bottom line - nothing extruded. I spent about $100 years ago for a name brand (I wont mention), that was on the infomercials.

The Imperia is easy to work with. Prepare the dough, pass it through the machine (folding it on itself), while turning the knob down - making it thinner, and thinner. You can achieve striped pasta (by making separate flavored batches), passing them separately through the machine, and then placing them side by side, and passing through the machine. You can make herbed pasta, by passing the pasta through the machine, placing fresh herbs onto the pasta, then sandwiching the dough between the dough.

Another option is to make it all by hand. Roll out your dough, fold it onto itself, and cut by hand.
post #3 of 8

Wanted to mention too, if you are making lasagna noodles, pass the dough through the machine, and cut with a pizza cutter for the ruffly edges.  Experiment with different flavors for the dough - lemon/pepper (one of my favorites), tomato, squid ink, fresh herbs, spinach (which I can no longer find in the market).  Make it your own.  Pasta-making seems to be a dying art, yet so simple to make at home.  Way better than grabbing a package of overpriced, sitting on a shelf, bug laden package of pasta from the market.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

I am actually looking for a more automated machine. One where I just put the ingredients into a hopper and the finished pasta comes out. The sort of think I am looking at would automatically mix the ingredients, then press (or extrude) them out through a die.

 

I have heard a lot of horror stories about the cheaper models. In particular, it appears that the dies should be brass and certainly not plastic. Also, the motor needs to be strong enough to deal with thick, heavy doughs. 

 

Everything I have seen that meets these criteria has a cost in the thousands. When spending this amount, I want to be sure that I will be happy with the machine as this is too much for me to spend on something that does not work easily, well and reliably.

 

Any suggestions? In particular, brands to go for or brands  to avoid?

 

Regards,

Doug

post #5 of 8

@dougsfarm

For your needs you should go with a smaller commercial machine vs a higher quality residential machine. I think the Italians produce the most dependable machines. You should probably go with a table top. When buying, look for the hopper size. You should be able to find a 1or2 Kg in your price range. I wouldn't buy anything under 1/2 hsp. Always check what type of electrical needs it takes. 220 is best for the 1/2 hsp.

Make sure there are replacements parts available in your area. Um, I might think of something else. Oh, absolutely brass dies. Those have to be handled with extreme care. If dropped the dent, in a sink full of other things the will chip and break. The key to longevity to a machine is cleaning. You must break down the machine completely after each use.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #6 of 8

I would check out restaurant supply stores, do some research online re commercial pasta extruders, or contact a large co., i.e.  Barilla, etc.

 

The machine I purchased had a powerful motor, multiple dyes, but did not extrude the pasta - even after oiling the dyes, and following the manufacturer's directions to a "T." For home use, to produce mass quantities for sale, after awhile, I imagine the motor will die. 

 

Another option, for home use, is using a Kitchenaide stand mixer, and purchasing the attachments for an additional, approximate $400.  I saw one recently displayed, in the window of Williams-Sonoma. You can find them at amazon, as well.

 

Hopefully, someone can give a brand name, and share tnt results.  Best of luck.

post #7 of 8

This page at Fante's.

 

Or, if you wanna' get really down home, how about a chitarra, also offered at Fantes.  But you'll need to check it's tension occasionally and I haven't any experience with these devices. 8)

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougsfarm View Post....................I would like to expand into producing pasta, using our own farm eggs. For this, I am looking into a pasta extruder machine...............

Regards,

Douig

 

Fettuccini, anyone, here!!!!!!!!   8)))))))

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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