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Least favorite prep jobs - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by lampy33 View Post


Rick I haven't mastered the french omelette yet but am working on it. If you have any tips they would be greatly appreciated!

 

 

It takes a little practice to get the technique of getting the omelet to roll up, I prefer to wack my wrist, pan angled down in any case.  I also prefer to scamble the eggs finer.  And as far as equipment the KitchenAide 8" ceramic omelet pan has the nice big radius you need, is inexpensive and durable, and ceramic works unbelievably here.

 

 

Rick

 

PS  Check out the movie, its a cult classic.

post #32 of 42

Yes, a perfect omelette is one of the hardest dishes to make. Ans so is fried rice. Anyone, even inexperienced line cooks can do either. But a good chef can turn the ordinary into the sublime.
 

 And a bowl of ramen might seem to be something that many people snear at, but a perfect bowl is sublime. I'm lucky I have a few places like that in my town, and they are places that many, including Beard winners and nominees, tend to show up and just hang out at on industry nights and between shifts. 

Tampopo is a MUST see for all chefs, cooks and gourmets. So many classic scenes about the love of food. I love the young executive at the restaurant and the older executives response to him. As someone who is also a gourment, and someone who understands societal pressure to conform and the duty not to outshine our elders or our "superiors" I can so relate to it.

https://youtu.be/PcMaZLiqVpI?t=15

That would be another great thread. Foodie movies!

Thanks for reminding me about tampopo, I'll probably watch it tonight


Edited by harrisonh - 7/21/15 at 11:09am
post #33 of 42

Picking thyme leaves off *yawn*

post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

for me, I don't mind the prep work. there are so many devicès, and shortcuts out there. The cleanup is the biggest pain.

 

I'm careful with the devices and shortcuts though. There's something about using my hands over a convenience machine or tool. Best example at the moment, are those handy dandy hand pumping veggie choppers by Popiel. By the time I chop and r-echop, take apart the tool to wash it,and put it back, I could have chopped all by hand and be on my way to the next step.

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 

 

I'm careful with the devices and shortcuts though. There's something about using my hands over a convenience machine or tool. Best example at the moment, are those handy dandy hand pumping veggie choppers by Popiel. By the time I chop and r-echop, take apart the tool to wash it,and put it back, I could have chopped all by hand and be on my way to the next step.


Yeah, those choppers have been around for awhile.  I don't own one.  As I said, I don't mind the prep, but there are some tools that are fun to work with I like, i.e.

 

Dumpling/won-ton/pierogy maker

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=dumpling+maker&tag=mh0b-20&index=aps&hvadid=4967911937&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_6q52sqryce_e

 

There's a machine I've had my eye on from China, but the price is kinda high.

post #36 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by letsforker View Post
 

Picking thyme leaves off *yawn*

 

I wish I knew of a good way to pick thyme leaves yikes!  That's why I mostly use dried thyme.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

I wish I knew of a good way to pick thyme leaves yikes!  That's why I mostly use dried thyme.

When I staged at a restaurant I had to pick herbs.  

 

A pint of thyme. A pint of oregano. A pint of rosemary.  

 

It just seems like a minor inconvenience to pluck a teaspoon now. 

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I wish I knew of a good way to pick thyme leaves yikes!  That's why I mostly use dried thyme.
you can freeze it and then tap it on the container, that works pretty well.
post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

 

I wish I knew of a good way to pick thyme leaves yikes!  That's why I mostly use dried thyme.

So....grasping the bottom of each stem and running your fingers up the stem to detach the leaves doesn't work for ya then ha?

post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

So....grasping the bottom of each stem and running your fingers up the stem to detach the leaves doesn't work for ya then ha?
I mean in an ideal world where your thyme comes on one central stem sure, I generally get thyme that has tiny side branches up and down the central stem.
post #41 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 

So....grasping the bottom of each stem and running your fingers up the stem to detach the leaves doesn't work for ya then ha?

 

It does not.  It works for rosemary and it works for the oregano I get.  But the thyme stems that are available to me here are very soft and rip.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #42 of 42

Better to run your fingers down the stem, against the angle of the leaves, in my opinion. But with soft ones, they gonna rip anyway.
 

Peeling borrettane onions sucks, too, by the way.

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