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hand protection

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've recently started a new job working in a wholesale kitchen, and a large portion of my day involves cutting slab cakes with a hot knife, the heat is drying out my palm and making the skin crack. moisturising helps, but I don't always remember to and I'd rather not have to. So I've been looking for some kind of protection for my palm, but besides heat resistant gloves I can't find anything. I hoped to find something to cover just the affected area but came up short, I thought there might be some kind of tool I could use to push down on a knife, but again I found nothing. I was hoping someone might know where I can get one of these things, or possibly had a better idea.

 

 

post #2 of 11

Fishing line or dental floss.

I lean to the unflavored floss just because it is labeled food safe.

 

mimi

 

Gotta comment.... use the floss to cut the cake not to wrap around the affected body part lol.

post #3 of 11

Get a double handle cheese knife. Problem solved.

Everybody's got to elevate from the norm.
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Everybody's got to elevate from the norm.
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post #4 of 11
wear gloves , is it ok ?
post #5 of 11

I think a long double handled cheese knife is a great idea. But if your employer doesn't have one, and you don't want to spend the money for one, I don't see why you wouldn't be able to use one of those "Ove Glove" things on the hand that is pressing down on the knife blade. They protect against the heat of the knife and provide some cushioning too, as they are fairly thick. (I have two...I use them mostly when I'm piping hot sugar out of a paper pastry cone). To be honest, I don't think the dental floss idea is super practical in a volume production environment.

post #6 of 11
Gloves are good but if the volume is enuf to do that much damage to the skin someone should spring for the proper equipment to do the job.
IMO.

No not dental floss but a guitar cutter or something along those lines.

mimi
post #7 of 11
Quote:
 Gloves are good but if the volume is enuf to do that much damage to the skin someone should spring for the proper equipment to do the job.
IMO.

Agreed! However, in my experience, I frequently had to supply my own equipment to do the proper job. Because employers aren't super willing to shell out money for

yet another piece of equipment that will probably get abused. 

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefpeon View Post
 
Quote:
 Gloves are good but if the volume is enuf to do that much damage to the skin someone should spring for the proper equipment to do the job.
IMO.

Agreed! However, in my experience, I frequently had to supply my own equipment to do the proper job. Because employers aren't super willing to shell out money for

yet another piece of equipment that will probably get abused. 

 

Also agreed and found out the hard way with my first Agbay.

That also brings to mind something the fisherman threw together while waiting for repair parts.

He made me a sort of leveler with a thin flexible SS saw type piece (used to shave ceramics and porcelain) he had hanging around the lab (think it came on a spool?)

 

It worked ok and I hatehatehate using hardware store stuff in my kitchens but had a shitload of orders.

 

mimi

post #9 of 11

cake saw, or recently wanted to replace the wire on my cheese cutter, saltwater wire leaders are stainless wire (in various thicknesses avail) strong as hell, and cheap.

For the after care found some stuff called "O'Keefe's Working Hands" cream, packaged in a bright green thing about the size of a hockey puck.

We've been processing a-l-o-t of various meats for the smoker and curing chamber many, many hot scrubs before the next batch takes its toll on my hands and that stuff is great. (no affiliation ftr) 

 

 

Cheers!

 

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #10 of 11

Hi Ben,

The glove thing may help. The main thing is to stay away from getting water on your hands, it will expedite the drying.

You need to keep moisture in your skin. I recommend night treatment. We use Udder Cream, I prefer the chamois cream. Buy a bunch of

white cotton handling gloves. They are used for coins, film and things. They are really cheap. Probably on amazon.  Before bed, put the cream on your hand generously

and wear the glove while you sleep. HTH's

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #11 of 11

I would suggest coconut oil. It does wonders for my hands when I have a stack of dishes to do in the triple sinks during the busy beginning of the week, and my skin just cracks and breaks. 

 

I think something like this would be helpful. Small enough to have set to one corner of your station, but nothing you would have to wear, like a glove.

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