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Melting foundant

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ok so I used the marshmallow foundant and left in fridge overnight and now looks very wet... but I also made flowers out of satin lace and placed in fridge and melted as well ...I'm just doin some experiments ...they wanna start working with foundant cakes in my hotel rather than buttercream... wich I live in pa...the kitchen is not air conditioning. ...and u personally feel that the walkinns... are wet ... if I leave a sweet bread with glaze on too and do not cover the nxt day the glaze liquied... any thoughts or suggestions
post #2 of 14

@cloey  the moisture is always going to be your enemy. Usually the higher the sugar content the more melt. You might try gum paste that you really dry out ahead of time. I make these on the smaller side and send them to the outlets in the hotel in milk cartons. They get put on right before service or display. If your budget allows you might even want to try marzipan flowers dried and painted. HTH's.

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post #3 of 14

As panini says, the moisture in the cooler is what's melting your fondant and the glaze.  Your walk in might just be too humid (especially with no a/c in the kitchen); you can try to minimize the effect by putting a fondant covered cake into a box, then wrapping the box completely in plastic wrap.  It won't eliminate the problem, it will just minimize it.  You'll still have condensation forming when you remove the cake from the cooler and into your kitchen where there is no a/c.  You might want to move the cake from the cooler into a room (or office) with a/c.  The condensation that forms will eventually evaporate.

post #4 of 14

what type  of fondant are you using? have you tried Massa Ti

cino

post #5 of 14

Headcheese65 is correct. Massa Tocino is designed for tropical (high humidity) conditions. Ask your supplier for a sample.

post #6 of 14

I agree about the Massa Ticino (by Carma in Switzerland, NOT to be confused with Albert Uster's Massa). Even though it is formulated for tropical climates, it is NOT foolproof in the fridge and has the same problems in refrigeration that any other fondant has. If your fondant problems are refrigeration related, Massa Ticino will not solve that, so be aware! Here is a link where you can buy some, just one of many:

http://www.lepicerie.com/White-Rolling-Fondant-TROPIC.html

post #7 of 14

If I stopped production because of humidity nothing would ever get done.

Over the years I learned to just deal with it.

 

Unless the sides are sliding down and pooling at the bottom of the cake I don't consider it a problem.

A wet cake can always be dealt with.

@JCakes mentioned one...the cardboard box will absorb most of the extra moisture (when bringing fondant covered whatever back to room temp)  and a very clean fan will take care of the rest.

Just don't touch the surface until the fondant is dry or you will leave a mark.

@Panini had some good tips when needing to make decorative features (mix fondant with gumpaste) that need to be sturdy but also dry within a decent period of time (have never worked with marzipan but pan is an expert so heed his advice ;-)

 

I am curious why your buttercream covered products are not affected by this humidity problem (unless you never hold them in the reefer and the ambient humidity of your work space is low?)

 

Go on a google search.....

There is a ton of info out there re walk in humidity and the problems it causes and how to fix it (the machine not the products lol).

Mostly it is a simple fix...just add a dehumidifier and there you go!

Here is one interesting link http://www.humiditytech.com/faqs.html

 

I am a 45 min drive from the Gulf of Mexico and for some insane reason most of my BTB's wanted barefoot on the beach themed weddings  :laser:with the with the white chocolate molded shell decos and graham cracker/brown sugar sand ..... hideous IMO but not my wedding eh?.

Most of the time whoever was responsible for setting up the event space would place my table in front of a west facing window....why they do that I will never understand...

Disaster waiting to happen, right?

I thought so until one of my peers talked me into freezing my unstacked tiers in cardboard bakery boxes.

When I got to the venue I unpacked the almost thawed cake and after the drying was complete ( carried 3 smallish, VERY clean fans) I stacked and then placed the decorations.

 

Yes I was a nervous wreck and my hands were shaking pretty badly until the last decorations were placed but the whole procedure left me with an almost cocky attitude re cakes and humidity.

 

Too bad I retired a few months later lol.

 

Sorry this was so wordy...I really should not drink so much coffee while online lol.

 

mimi

post #8 of 14

Forgot too add... when the MOB returned my rentals the next week I asked her about the interior temp of the cake when it was cut.

I asked pretending to be concerned about the sunny location of the bride's cake table.

She said it was nice and cool and cut like a charm.

 

mimi

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

If I stopped production because of humidity nothing would ever get done.
Over the years I learned to just deal with it.

Unless the sides are sliding down and pooling at the bottom of the cake I don't consider it a problem.
A wet cake can always be dealt with.
@JCakes
 mentioned one...the cardboard box will absorb most of the extra moisture (when bringing fondant covered whatever back to room temp)  and a very clean fan will take care of the rest.
Just don't touch the surface until the fondant is dry or you will leave a mark.
@Panini had some good tips when needing to make decorative features (mix fondant with gumpaste) that need to be sturdy but also dry within a decent period of time (have never worked with marzipan but pan is an expert so heed his advice ;-)

I am curious why your buttercream covered products are not affected by this humidity problem (unless you never hold them in the reefer and the ambient humidity of your work space is low?)

Go on a google search.....
There is a ton of info out there re walk in humidity and the problems it causes and how to fix it (the machine not the products lol).
Mostly it is a simple fix...just add a dehumidifier and there you go!
Here is one interesting link http://www.humiditytech.com/faqs.html

I am a 45 min drive from the Gulf of Mexico and for some insane reason most of my BTB's wanted barefoot on the beach themed weddings  laser.gif with the with the white chocolate molded shell decos and graham cracker/brown sugar sand ..... hideous IMO but not my wedding eh?.
Most of the time whoever was responsible for setting up the event space would place my table in front of a west facing window....why they do that I will never understand...
Disaster waiting to happen, right?
I thought so until one of my peers talked me into freezing my unstacked tiers in cardboard bakery boxes.
When I got to the venue I unpacked the almost thawed cake and after the drying was complete ( carried 3 smallish, VERY clean fans) I stacked and then placed the decorations.

Yes I was a nervous wreck and my hands were shaking pretty badly until the last decorations were placed but the whole procedure left me with an almost cocky attitude re cakes and humidity.

Too bad I retired a few months later lol.

Sorry this was so wordy...I really should not drink so much coffee while online lol.

mimi
I'm
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

If I stopped production because of humidity nothing would ever get done.
Over the years I learned to just deal with it.

Unless the sides are sliding down and pooling at the bottom of the cake I don't consider it a problem.
A wet cake can always be dealt with.
@JCakes
 mentioned one...the cardboard box will absorb most of the extra moisture (when bringing fondant covered whatever back to room temp)  and a very clean fan will take care of the rest.
Just don't touch the surface until the fondant is dry or you will leave a mark.
@Panini had some good tips when needing to make decorative features (mix fondant with gumpaste) that need to be sturdy but also dry within a decent period of time (have never worked with marzipan but pan is an expert so heed his advice ;-)

I am curious why your buttercream covered products are not affected by this humidity problem (unless you never hold them in the reefer and the ambient humidity of your work space is low?)

Go on a google search.....
There is a ton of info out there re walk in humidity and the problems it causes and how to fix it (the machine not the products lol).
Mostly it is a simple fix...just add a dehumidifier and there you go!
Here is one interesting link http://www.humiditytech.com/faqs.html

I am a 45 min drive from the Gulf of Mexico and for some insane reason most of my BTB's wanted barefoot on the beach themed weddings  laser.gif with the with the white chocolate molded shell decos and graham cracker/brown sugar sand ..... hideous IMO but not my wedding eh?.
Most of the time whoever was responsible for setting up the event space would place my table in front of a west facing window....why they do that I will never understand...
Disaster waiting to happen, right?
I thought so until one of my peers talked me into freezing my unstacked tiers in cardboard bakery boxes.
When I got to the venue I unpacked the almost thawed cake and after the drying was complete ( carried 3 smallish, VERY clean fans) I stacked and then placed the decorations.

Yes I was a nervous wreck and my hands were shaking pretty badly until the last decorations were placed but the whole procedure left me with an almost cocky attitude re cakes and humidity.

Too bad I retired a few months later lol.

Sorry this was so wordy...I really should not drink so much coffee while online lol.

mim
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure as to why the buttercream is ok .but it's badglazes on bread Suffer ..keylime. suffers but my buttercream on cake seems to b fine... I just had a talk with my owner and explained that we need aircondioners. ..anda dehumidifier. ..he argued as to why I explained showed pict...we shall see..but thank u ...I will try after bringing it out of walking to put it in a box or or poss put a cart bag over it while in walkin...so much to try in such little time
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloey View Post

Ok so I used the marshmallow foundant and left in fridge overnight and now looks very wet... but I also made flowers out of satin lace and placed in fridge and melted as well ...I'm just doin some experiments ...they wanna start working with foundant cakes in my hotel rather than buttercream... wich I live in pa...the kitchen is not air conditioning. ...and u personally feel that the walkinns... are wet ... if I leave a sweet bread with glaze on too and do not cover the nxt day the glaze liquied... any thoughts or suggestions
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure as to why the buttercream is ok .but it's badglazes on bread Suffer ..keylime. suffers but my buttercream on cake seems to b fine... I just had a talk with my owner and explained that we need aircondioners. ..anda dehumidifier. ..he argued as to why I explained showed pict...we shall see..but thank u ...I will try after bringing it out of walking to put it in a box or or poss put a cart bag over it while in walkin...so much to try in such little time



Personal opinion as to what temp should a kitchen b to work with foundant...
post #13 of 14

The perfect solution IMO is to have a separate room for all of the fancy work.

No ovens no dish pit nothing that puts off constant heat/humidity as it is all those things that cause the FUBAR situations in the first place (maybe allow a home kitchen type reefer).....

Put this hobbit hole on a separate a/c and thermostat (there are small room units available that don't need a window to install) and regulate for the best temp for your situation.

I doubt you could get this request thru unless you have high volume sales of expensive pastries and confections to pay for it.

 

Fantasyland....

 

mimi

 

You would still need a good dehumidifier installed into the walk in cooler in the main kitchen (that is if you still need to refrigerate the finished products before delivery).

post #14 of 14

Just weighing in as usual. I have worked fondant in warm/hot rooms without problems. I have also done fondant where I dried it a bit before using and wrapped it almost

air-tight immediately and into a very humid walk in. I was just as I left it. It would have survived in a cold rainstorm. The only tricky part of covering a cake is, It is so important

to have all your products the same temp. I have seen people drape 80Deg. fondant over a very cold cake, or even frozen and then wonder why it's bleeding. The temperature

difference is usually what gets you, not the humidity. If we have an outside event that wants fondant, we insist that the filling be something shelf stabil like BC.

Also don't be afraid to roll chilled fondant. It is usually the warmer temp that will draw on moisture. I've have seen numerous bakers freeze layers then drape them and put them in the cooler.

I have never seen this work. It's not the fondant, it's the science. I've seen bakers drape a frozen cake then wrap it. Then they are surprised when they find out the have actually created rain.

Just think of it as a glass of ice water on a warm day.

 

http://www.dpcalc.org/

 

check this site. Most thermostats now have humidity reading. You can tell at what temperature a product will sweat or drip.

 

 

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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