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Thinking of switching from deck to conveyor oven

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I previously posted this in equipment reviews, but think it is more appropriate here.

 

We offer good quality pizza cooked in a deck oven. If we were to switch to a conveyer oven, how much would we sacrifice in quality and taste? What can we do to minimize that effect?

We pride ourselves in the quality of our food. We want efficiency, but not at the price of quality. At least to a minimal extent.

We run a fast casual restaurant, which
offers pizza as one of the menu choices. Currently, we're using deck ovens. I know the differences between deck and conveyor. Our problem isn't only that skilled Labour is hard to find, but more that it is harder to retain. This is where a conveyor oven would be of benefit.

post #2 of 4

Is your pizza on a screen?  If so it should not be a problem.  You don't have to rotate deck positions and your bottoms will always be consistent.  The tops too.

 

Also pretty sure it doesn't take two hours to heat up.

post #3 of 4

Hey @greekexpress ,

Just a few questions. What material is your deck made out of? Do you use the deck to cook other things like sandwiches and such?

What ingredients are on your pizzas and do they take approximately the same time to cook?

What type of conveyer are you considering? Radiant, infrared, or forced air?

 

Just from what I know and having friends with pizza places. The conveyer is limiting. Usually to one item. The pizza ingredients you are

using now will have to be adjusted to keep cooking times exactly the same. All the preveyers will try to sell you on forced air. It really cuts down on the time it takes to completely cook something. The downside is that it dries out the ingredients on the pies. You will need to compensate for that also. So basically if you are not cooking the same product and your portion control is not absolutely consistent the conveyer can result in a lesser quality product.

The deck gives you greater flexibility in the items you can cook. It also allows one to adjust the cooking times if the ingredients are not the same and the amount of ingredients may not be exactly portioned. I think it is superior when it comes to crusting.

 

So I guess to sum it up, this is just my opinion, the conveyer might reduce the skilled labor need and maybe save some time, but that's where it ends. I personally think it takes the same amount of skill to get proportions exactly as needed as it does to tend the deck. just me though. I'm sure some chefs will have the opposite view of the ovens. Ciao

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post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

Hey @greekexpress ,

Just a few questions. What material is your deck made out of? Do you use the deck to cook other things like sandwiches and such?

What ingredients are on your pizzas and do they take approximately the same time to cook?

What type of conveyer are you considering? Radiant, infrared, or forced air?

 

Just from what I know and having friends with pizza places. The conveyer is limiting. Usually to one item. The pizza ingredients you are

using now will have to be adjusted to keep cooking times exactly the same. All the preveyers will try to sell you on forced air. It really cuts down on the time it takes to completely cook something. The downside is that it dries out the ingredients on the pies. You will need to compensate for that also. So basically if you are not cooking the same product and your portion control is not absolutely consistent the conveyer can result in a lesser quality product.

The deck gives you greater flexibility in the items you can cook. It also allows one to adjust the cooking times if the ingredients are not the same and the amount of ingredients may not be exactly portioned. I think it is superior when it comes to crusting.

 

So I guess to sum it up, this is just my opinion, the conveyer might reduce the skilled labor need and maybe save some time, but that's where it ends. I personally think it takes the same amount of skill to get proportions exactly as needed as it does to tend the deck. just me though. I'm sure some chefs will have the opposite view of the ovens. Ciao

 

Thanks for the really quick, informative response.

 

We're using a stone deck oven, and I wasn't sure which type of conveyor would be ideal. Forced air is what i was looking at due to speed. 

yes, we cook more than pizza on our ovens. 

 

We would have to keep one deck oven and replace the rest with conveyors.

 

But even then, we would need to change our recipes to adjust to the new oven. Significant changes would be needed. Our pizzas are good quality and they're expensive. An x-large pizza can run you upwards of $40. We would not be able to offer the same quality. We'd have to change our whole business model.

 

I know franchises like pizza hut,  and dominoes have conveyors, but I wouldn't compare their pizza to ours.

 

Are there any major franchises with really good quality pizza that use conveyors?

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