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50/50 vs 70/30 edges

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Korin is having a sale through the end of the month and I wanted to pick up a new knife, the knife im looking at is 70/30 is there a major difference in technique here? Also this will mean that its left or right hand specific correct?
post #2 of 16

All japanese knives are asymmetric to some extent.  The number is roughly describing the bevel, but it doesn't seem to really mean anything.  Other than the bevel, the grind is usually asymmetric.  Usually the left side is more flat and the right side is more convexed for food release.  If you only change the bevel angles, it doesn't change that fact. This is less dramatic on thinner knives (lasers). I wouldn't worry about it unless you're left handed. Then ideally you get a lefty ground knife OR a laser where it's so thin that it's basically flat on either side. 

 

For me, my edges come out asymmetric naturally because when I sharpen the left side I don't hold the knife angle as low.  I don't really think about it much unless I'm setting or changing the existing bevel.  Otherwise, just follow what's there.

 

The 15% sale btw doesn't stack with the 10% industry membership.  Or it didn't seem to in my cart.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for letting me know, I am lefty so ill ask about it when I get to the store, ill also ask about the discounts stacking.
post #4 of 16

Let me know what you find out about the coupons because that might push me over the edge on some items.

 

Also definitely opt in for initial sharpening (it's free)

post #5 of 16

Oooh Korin is having a sale....  WHY DO THIS TO ME KNIFE WORLD!!!


What items are being discounted?

Thanks :)

post #6 of 16

All knives 15% off.  They'll do it again around Dec or January

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

All knives 15% off.  They'll do it again around Dec or January

OH BABY!

The thing I noticed when doing my knife searching is that I didn't really get many recommendations from Korin...  Maybe some of their brands, but never Korin specifically, even though Korin seems like a huge store.

post #8 of 16

Well their double bevels are mostly western handled and mostly stainless.  Maybe not the most exciting, but certainly solid working knives for the pro kitchen, and that's who they are marketed to the most.  They seem to have two markets cornered.  American chefs getting their first J knife, and sushi chefs. In between, not so much stuff.

 

I have their house brand yanagiba and deba. 

 

Initial sharpening is included on their stuff, that's nice especially if you are new to sharpening.

 

It's a cool shop and I stop by whenever I'm in NYC, if just to avoid shipping charges.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Well their double bevels are mostly western handled and mostly stainless.  Maybe not the most exciting, but certainly solid working knives for the pro kitchen, and that's who they are marketed to the most.  They seem to have two markets cornered.  American chefs getting their first J knife, and sushi chefs. In between, not so much stuff.

 

I have their house brand yanagiba and deba. 

 

Initial sharpening is included on their stuff, that's nice especially if you are new to sharpening.

 

It's a cool shop and I stop by whenever I'm in NYC, if just to avoid shipping charges.



their stuff looks really nice, and they have a ton of it, including extra stuff non-knife related.


I'm looking to pick up a Hi-Soft cutting board, and a bunch of soup spoons... OH YEAH!

Trying to figure out what else... I need...

post #10 of 16

Sorry to hijack your thread, @kingfarvito

 

I picked up the hi soft board a couple weeks ago.  It's great to not lug around an end grain block to BBQ jobs.

 

I also got some cool tableware. 

 

\

The one on the left for fried appetizers or maybe some grilled meat on a bed of lettuce or carrot string.  Right one probably for sushi or bite sized fried things with some sauce.  Tweezer plating!

 

 

This one probably if I float something in a clear broth like a dashi.  Onsen tomago,  agedashi tofu, etc.

post #11 of 16
Yeah... Sorry to hijack :(

Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Sorry to hijack your thread, @kingfarvito

 

I picked up the hi soft board a couple weeks ago.  It's great to not lug around an end grain block to BBQ jobs.

 

I also got some cool tableware. 

 

\

The one on the left for fried appetizers or maybe some grilled meat on a bed of lettuce or carrot string.  Right one probably for sushi or bite sized fried things with some sauce.  Tweezer plating!

 

 

This one probably if I float something in a clear broth like a dashi.  Onsen tomago,  agedashi tofu, etc.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

Sorry to hijack your thread, @kingfarvito

 

I picked up the hi soft board a couple weeks ago.  It's great to not lug around an end grain block to BBQ jobs.

 

I also got some cool tableware. 

 

\

The one on the left for fried appetizers or maybe some grilled meat on a bed of lettuce or carrot string.  Right one probably for sushi or bite sized fried things with some sauce.  Tweezer plating!

 

 

This one probably if I float something in a clear broth like a dashi.  Onsen tomago,  agedashi tofu, etc.


Thoughts on the Hi-Soft?  I heard it's really soft with feedback, and I would assume that it wouldn't hurt the edge like wood would, since it's soft.

Nice tableware :)

@kingfarvito what knife are you looking to get? 


Speaking of technique, what exactly is the bevel of a Japanese, single-sided knife?  It seems 90/10 is pretty close to that, I hear.  I hear that you do need a different technique for the single-sided blades, so I would assume you would have to get used to the difference between a standard 50/50 Western, and a 70/30 :).

Good luck!

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LasagnaBurrito View Post
 

 

 I would assume you would have to get used to the difference between a standard 50/50 Western, and a 70/30 :).
 

 

No. I use the same technique for all my double bevel knives.. 

 

The Hi Soft board is soft compared to wood I guess, but I haven't had any knives cut into it yet. 

 

90/10 just means you sharpen one side and de-burr the other side.  Single bevel knives are not flat on the left side,  the left side is actually concave.  So you need to do uraoshi sharpening.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

 

No. I use the same technique for all my double bevel knives.. 

 

The Hi Soft board is soft compared to wood I guess, but I haven't had any knives cut into it yet. 

 

90/10 just means you sharpen one side and de-burr the other side.  Single bevel knives are not flat on the left side,  the left side is actually concave.  So you need to do uraoshi sharpening.



Well I've heard that you need to use a different technique with a Yanagiba vs a Sujihiki, so I was assuming that was due to single/vs dual sided.  As for the "non-sharp" side, I hear that it's supposed to be concave, but sometimes can be more flatter in cheaper knives.  That's what I've heard, though.

post #14 of 16

If you overdo the uraoshi sharpening on the other side you could flatten it out yourself too.  I don't think there's anyway for your normal home user to fix that.  You need a wheel to concave it again.  For the small amount of concaving, you want a BIG WHEEL.  Small wheels would concave too deep.

 

Just stay away from single bevels unless you work in a japanese kitchen.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

If you overdo the uraoshi sharpening on the other side you could flatten it out yourself too.  I don't think there's anyway for your normal home user to fix that.  You need a wheel to concave it again.  For the small amount of concaving, you want a BIG WHEEL.  Small wheels would concave too deep.

 

Just stay away from single bevels unless you work in a japanese kitchen.



Sounds good to me :), thanks for the info.

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post
 

If you overdo the uraoshi sharpening on the other side you could flatten it out yourself too.  I don't think there's anyway for your normal home user to fix that.  You need a wheel to concave it again.  For the small amount of concaving, you want a BIG WHEEL.  Small wheels would concave too deep.

 

Just stay away from single bevels unless you work in a japanese kitchen.

even with a big wheel, its not always possible.  Its very important to not overdo the uraoshi.

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