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Leftover juices, lemon, garlic and thyme

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi, 

 

Hope you can help with some inspiration!

 

I did some slow-roasted chicken (roughly this one: http://www.nigella.com/recipes/view/slow-roasted-garlic-and-lemon-chicken-203) yesterday. Of course there were plenty of juices left over... but before discarding the lemon chunks etc, I remembered the comment in the recipe about the lemon being all edible after being roasted for that long. 

 

For that reason, I put all the juices in a blender, with the lemon, thyme and garlic cloves, deciding I'd make something of it later... 

 

The mixture smells divine, but is quite thick. My question to you is: what are some of the ways I could use this? I expect I could make a stock if thinned down considerably, or a thick soup if thinned a little... but any suggestions would be great. 

 

Many thanks in advance!

post #2 of 6
I'd pass it through a fine sieve and reduce it down to make a jus, serve over a grilled chicken breast and some lentils/rice.

Just be careful thoug - it has come into contact with meat though so you'll want to be careful with how long you store it for,. I'd say 2-3 days max or I'd be concerned about bacteria.
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much. I thinned half, left the other half as was, and froze both fairly quickly. I will try your suggestion with the undiluted batch. Thanks again!

post #4 of 6

I would be most concerned with how long it was out before mixing. Any length of time and I would hesitate to store it. The bacteria isn't scary, you can get rid of that with reboiling. It the toxins or spores that get you. You can't get rid of those. Well, your body will try to get rid of them:eek:

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post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for mentioning. I struggle to recall - perhaps about 1 hour at room temperature?

 

I must admit that I'm not sure what you mean by toxins and spores in this specific context - is there something about the ingredients specifically I need to be careful with?

 

Thanks again :)

post #6 of 6

@mejonbigtree ,

I hope Luc_H comes on to scientifically explain. Cooking protein to certain temperatures will kill any bacteria in your food. The bacteria, once it's established, which is sometimes really quickly, produces toxins. The toxins are the bad stuff that make you really sick. They are not destroyed by

heat or cold.

Some good info here: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/danger-zone-40-f-140-f/CT_Index

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