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My first quality knife set - Page 2

post #31 of 37
No I wasn't planning on that Rick. Very odd suggestion, but fairly predictable. If anyone interested in my notion of cheapist blades I'd be suggesting Forgecraft or Old Hickory. But nobody has asked yet. Thanks though.
post #32 of 37
Forgecraft is a good project knife, but the factory grind is real fat. Expect to spend at least 4 hours thinning, and that's if you know what you're doing. On the plus side, it's harder than most old dirty carbons at 58-59 HRC. Superior edge holding, but you can use a honing steel on this knife. It has cool history and anything you find is already vintage.

Old hickory is still in production so it doesnt have vintageness. You get what you pay for with these. I have the butcher knife as a loaner for bbq newbs.
post #33 of 37

The nice thing about modern Old Hickorys is---- they don't use Hickory for handles anymore. They always were practically the only ones doing that but walnut is cheaper these days. That comes straight from Ontario Knife Company by the way.

post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knifeforhire View Post
 

The nice thing about modern Old Hickorys is---- they don't use Hickory for handles anymore. They always were practically the only ones doing that but walnut is cheaper these days. That comes straight from Ontario Knife Company by the way.

haha!  "Old"  "Hickory"

post #35 of 37
All this talk of handle wood has me thinking that perhaps the Ho wood(s) of the Northeast States are Larch and "false" red cedar (called red cedar, looks and smells it, but is actually a species of Juniper).

Both these are light and strong, and very resistant to rot. I'd have to consider them for when/if I do my first re-handle.



Rick
post #36 of 37
That's something to consider. I went with hard dense woods and it definitely shifted the weight of my knives to be handle heavy. Then again a custom handle is about looks. You can also drill more holes in the metal to remove weight
post #37 of 37

Red cedar is pretty stuff, the heart is a wonderful purple.  Lots of dead trees to be found in excellent shape so far as the wood is concerned, I'll keep an eye open if you want any.

 

 

Rick

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