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Salt - Page 2

post #31 of 53

"...the taste of  melting snow,mixed with the fur off the gloves, rock salt,  dirt, bird seed, dog poop, etc."

 

Oh, yum!

 

Is this how you developed your taste for food and passion for cooking? :eek:

 

Mike  :lips:

travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #32 of 53

It's not the shape or thickness. Morton and Diamond Kosher salts have distinctly different shapes and thicknesses and they do not weigh the same when measured out by volume. Morton is passed through rollers and is flatter. Diamond is more of a snow-flake like crystal.

 

The formula I've seen in more than one place is:

 

1 tsp of table salt = 1 and 1/4 tsp of Morton = 1 and 3/4 tsp of Diamond.

post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaminute View Post

I only use the purest salt from dehydrated unicorn tears. It's subtle, but I think it's worth it.


not from unicorn tears but apparently this is the best salt ever (according to these harvesters).

 

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

Sorry, I didn't read through. This may have already posted.

Living in Brooklyn as a kid, made it possible for me to get odd jobs frequently because of my passion for food. I worked in quite a few Jewish Deli's, food preparation kitchens.

I was pretty well know and liked by many Jewish food store owners. Easy to make pretty good money, as long as I stayed in the back and didn't come out to speak with customers.

I prepared tons of meat to be koshered. I couldn't do the act but most all everything else. The Kosher salt came in bulk and was a certain type of cut/flake. It didn't dissolve much when

in came in contact with water/moisture. This is important. Kosher Jews are not allowed to eat blood from mammals and birds. So we had to remove all the blood from the meat.

This started with washing the meat to remove surface blood and foreign things. Then it gets soaked in large tubs. 1-2hrs. cut the meat into smaller football size pieces. You gotta then jiggle it until most water is off ( can't count how many pieces I ruined by dropping) then it gets coated with the Kosher salt in the air and than sat to rest. I got caught one day just laying the meat on the salt and bringing the salt up around the sides. The Rabbi's assistant went ballistic on me for that. I always figured it was a religious thing until one day the Rabbi explained that if you packed the salt on the meat it wouldn't be able to drain blood and would have to be tossed. Go figure?The cut of the salt made it hard to melt and acted like a sponge when the meat started to drip. Then we laid them all out. They sat out for hours. Then we had our production line and rubbed off all the salt, rinse it with our makeshift shower, and the next three guys did the same thing. There was always a time limit on the meat or chicken. On busy days the salting was the last thing we did before closing. Some days Saul my favorite boss would send one of the boys running to get me out of bed sometimes 4AM. Poor Saul would be pacing all over the place staring at his watch, yelling Italian expletives he learned from me, because if we didn't finish doing the meat on time it all had to be pitched.

So that's what Kosher salt is all about.

  OMGosh, one day I'll post about Koshering liver. The deli out front would go through 100 lbs. + chopped liver.  Since Koshering liver I've never had arm hair.

 

 

I have very fond memories of what you describe. My father's 5 uncles co-owned a grocery store with a Kosher butcher attached.

I saw that salted meat laying on a wooden board (Zaltzvegle) for hours then back into water bath. 

 

I never had the pleasure of eating medium rare liver with bacon and onions until I was an adult.

It usually was tough enough to nail on to your shoe and use it as leather.

post #35 of 53

In my neck of the woods I rarely see this product but I am visiting the US currently, went grocery shopping and found this quite interesting:

 

Kosher for passover salt from Morton's (This is a higher standard of Kosher)


Says it does not supply iodide, a necessary nutrient

but then the ingredients are:


Salt, yellow prussiate of soda  (that last ingredient is Sodium ferrocyanide)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_ferrocyanide

 

Morton does offer a pure salt product but most of the selection I saw have this ingredient and/or other additives

 

I am an avid label reader

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #36 of 53

I regret posting so often on this thread.... But I think I eluded the reason for why iodized salt is usually not kosher:

 

Excerpt

Today most table salt contains this nutrient in the form of potassium iodide. Potassium iodide, however, tends to degrade in the presence of moisture; in order to protect the iodine, a small amount of dextrose often is added to the salt to prevent oxidation. While not generally a kashrus concern, dextrose is derived from corn (and sometimes, wheat) starch, and therefore poses an issue for Passover use. It is for this reason that we purchase non-iodized salt for Passover. Ironically, it is the preservative - and not the iodine itself - that poses the problem.

Other ingredients, such as calcium silicate or yellow prussate of soda, are added to table salt to ensure that it pours even in humid conditions and poses no kashrus concerns.

 

http://www.star-k.org/kashrus/kk-palate-s&p.htm

 

So no iodine but anticaking ingredients are acceptable

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #37 of 53

Both Morton Kosher (as Luc showed) and Diamond Crystal Kosher have the Kosher for Passover as well as the "U" designation.

post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaminute View Post

I only use the purest salt from dehydrated unicorn tears. It's subtle, but I think it's worth it.

 

Alaminute hits the nail on the head dead center. :thumb:

post #39 of 53

If you want totally pure salt get pickling salt. It has nothing added. I use it for popcorn and canning(it is a finer salt) along with on top of fried foods sometimes.

post #40 of 53

Diamond Kosher salt doesn't have an anti-caking agent in it. It probably doesn't need it as much as Morton would  because Diamond's crystals are pyramid- shaped and fluffier than Morton's, which are flat from passing through rollers.

 

Also, Morton boxes always say Kosher for Passover. Kosher for Passover means the product was produced in a facility certified as free from "Chametz"--foods made from a variety of grain products and/or leavening agents, or "Kitnoyot"--an entirely different list of grains and leavening items, which list also includes legumes and some seeds.

post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post
 

Diamond Kosher salt doesn't have an anti-caking agent in it.

AFAIK Kosher salt never has anti-caking agents in it. 

post #42 of 53
Quote:
 AFAIK Kosher salt never has anti-caking agents in it.

 

Morton Kosher does. See Luc's picture of the label above.

post #43 of 53
post #44 of 53
Thread Starter 

I have that book.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post
 

Morton Kosher does. See Luc's picture of the label above.

Well there goes that theory then. Thanks for pointing that out. 

post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

I have that book.


If you like that kind of reading, you should also consider Cod and Pencil.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cod-Biography-Fish-Changed-World/dp/0140275010

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Pencil-History-Design-Circumstance/dp/0679734155

post #47 of 53

Yes. Salt is another book that somehow ended up near the bottom of my huge "to read"pile. Bought it for a book group but before I could start it, one of the other people in the group announced she was having trouble getting interested in it and it lost its place on the top of the heap. Someday....

 

There is also a new-ish book on the history of Pepper:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Pepper-History-Worlds-Influential-Spice/dp/1250048664

 

And, not food related (even though you do have to cook the fiber used to make it) but a book about a single thing we take for granted that completely changed the world, there is a new-ish book on the history of paper; I'm a hand papermaker so I am a little obsessed with paper in history.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Paper-Everything-Its-Two-Thousand-Year-History/dp/0307279642/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439493428&sr=1-1&keywords=on+paper+the+everything+of+its+two-thousand-year+history

 

And, Four Fish is about the 4 most commonly eaten fish-- How they came to dominate our menus, where they come from, how to keep them sustainable, etc.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Four-Fish-Future-Last-Wild/dp/014311946X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439493597&sr=1-1&keywords=four+fish

 

Sorry. I'm a bookseller. All you have to do is breathe the word "book" to get me started.

post #48 of 53


Panini!

I worked for just about every Kosher Caterer In Bklyn and Queens..both orthodox and Glatt kosher(ultra religious)  We used tons of chopped liver, that was my job when I was a kid and first started.

First thing check if the liver was accompanied by a letter of authenticity from the Kashruth as to its source. Next skin it and slice it. Then wash it and sprinkle with salt  . Let it drain over sink. Then under the rabbis supervision  Set it on a fine rack and place under a hot broiler till well done. After cooking place in a tub of ice water to rinse it again. Drain  then it is ready to make chopped liver. The trick to good chopped liver is the degree to which the onions are cooked . They should be carmelized  but not burned. We found it best if they were cooked in half cooking oil and half rendered chicken fat (smaltz). Hard cooked eggs , salt and pepper are added when the chopping process begins.

       Some places, as well as the chopped liver you buy in the supermarkets add matzo meal to stretch it and make it cheaper. It freezes  well when placed in air tight containers. Kosher meat leaves a lot to be desired I have heard it described as horsemeat. Kosher veal in particular is very bad.

In my opinion kosher chickens are very good . The purpose of drawing out the blood in poultry and meat is because it is the  blood and sitting in the blood that makes the product go  bad. So the blood has to go. The place I ran in Queens was called Terrace on The Park and at one time was the largest on premise social caterer in the USA.  We grossed about 11 million per year in just banquets.  Those were the days

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #49 of 53
post #50 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post


If you like that kind of reading, you should also consider Cod and Pencil.

http://www.amazon.com/Cod-Biography-Fish-Changed-World/dp/0140275010

http://www.amazon.com/The-Pencil-History-Design-Circumstance/dp/0679734155
I have the cod book though not the pencil book. I do have the Rats book too which is fascinating but that has nothing to do with salt or food.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #51 of 53
...rat book?
post #52 of 53

I'm guessing it's this one. I've heard this author on the radio and he is actually highly entertaining.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Rats-Observations-History-Unwanted-Inhabitants/dp/1582344779/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439960907&sr=1-1&keywords=rats

post #53 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoTerry View Post
 

I'm guessing it's this one. I've heard this author on the radio and he is actually highly entertaining.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Rats-Observations-History-Unwanted-Inhabitants/dp/1582344779/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439960907&sr=1-1&keywords=rats

Yes, fascinating creatures.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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