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Hafa Adai

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hafa Adai To all,

I stumbled into this site this morning and decidded to say hello. I am a member of several other "chef" sites, one more wont hurt. I do love the information age and the ability to discuss common problems and have a laugh with other professionals, and non professionals.

Chef Kevin
post #2 of 12
Hello, Chef Kevin, and welcome to Chef Talk. I'm pretty sure you're the first member we have from the place were America's day begins. Please tell us a bit about yourself here in the Welcome Forum. Then browse and post as you like in our friendly community. I'll bet you have delightful produce to work with where you are, but also have challenges with some types of supplies.

Again, welcome to the Cafe. We'll look forward to your contributions.

Mezzaluna
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hafa Adai Mezzaluna,

Thank you for the warm welcome.

You hit a sore spot when you said produce. To make a long story as short as possible I wil say that due to the lock out of the dock workers for 10 days and 2 typhoons in July, There is no produce to be found. I have fresh coconuts and potatoes. I have seen before when new hotels open up here the island will run out of onions or carrots or tomatoes, but this is different. You go into the grocer and the produce section is closed!

Its O.K. though, In less than 8 hours I should be suckingt on a sweet tomato and hearing the gentle crunch of a fresh carrot! At least that is what my vendor is saying. (Knock on wood)

Other than my current lack of produce yes you are right, I get to play with all kinds of cool fruit.

Thanks again for the welcome, I will be around,

Chef Kevin
post #4 of 12

Long, long ago.

'Twas 40+ years ago we spun jeeps at Agat and went snorkeling at Gabgab. Rockfish, rainbow colored fish and brain coral that slowly changed color - evolving like a slow motion arid ocean. To hear a U.S. Marine recollect a beachfront invasion conducted by the Japanese at Gabgab, well now, some 55 years ago you'd think that it happened yesterday. A major experience. 'Twas now, still is, and will always be somethin' to reflect. Heard from a Real Warrior lately? How many warriors have y'all come across? Huh?

Tell me about fruit bat preparation with a side of breadfruit?

And the town town mona's?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hafa Adai Che`lu,

The Tao Tao Monas' Are fine as long as you do not piss them off! The coral reefs have changed and I am sorry to say it is for the worse. Still a magnificant thing to see. At Gab Gab Two they now have a submarine for the tourists and there is a family of Giant Blue Travely living there, Goerge, Sam, and Alex. These Blue Travely are "kinda" tame but you better not point with an expossed finger, they will think it is a hot dog. Goerge is at least 200 pounds +. Chuck lives there also, the resident Eel. He's fat and about 100 pounds. The Stone Fish & Lion Fish are still all over the place so you need to watch your step on the reef. Wow this is cool! Went spear fishing down in Ipan a few nights ago. Heaps of octypus, and crab as big and bigger than foot balls! Enough Lobster to feed a small army.

O.K., to answer your question, Fruit Bat is now an endangered spiecies along with the Sea Turtle, but I prefer Sea Turtle if you ask me. Fruit Bats are like eating rats with wings and a short tail. If you want recipes let me know. The best way to prepare bread fruit is a fire with coconut husks, Burn the skin until it is ...well... charcoal, like a bell pepper but really burnt. Then you peel, slice, drizzle butter, s & p and mmmmmmmmmmm Heavan!

Were you in the initial invation or follow up? Do you remember Asan Point, and the Piti Bomb Holes?

A lot has changed since you were here... If you want any more info let me know, I love to talk up my beautiful paridise...

Culinary regards,


Chef Kevin
post #6 of 12

Re: Long, long ago.

Yep. One went ashore at Omaha after going through North Africa and Sicily. Another went ashore at Guadalcanal followed by Okinawa.

What's this got to do with welcoming a new member?

Welcome, chefkevind.
post #7 of 12
Nick, it was just an off the wall question. When I live on Guam from '61 thru '63, it was a steping for forces going to Vietnam and I lived next to the Marine barracks. So as a young kid it provided lots of attraction to me.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 12
Where is Gabgab Two?

I remember our next door neighbor, a Japanese lady, taking her son and I to Agat beach. As George and I would play and snorkel, she tossed her fishnets into the warm blue water just before or after an incoming wave broke. What a symbol of rhythm.

Wasp populations were quite abundant. I know, having been attacked by two swarms of paper wasps followed by being dragged kicking and screaming to the dispensary for an injection of anti venom. Yeech. Are bumbolas, a bee quite black and twice the size of bumble bee, still present? Then there were mud daubers and I can't remember all there were.

Tarague beach was beautiful; it's where I sustained the worst sunburn of my life - vomiting later that night and all.

A publication called Glimpses of Guam brings a really good price at ebay, around $15 an issue. Also, for you philatelists, postage stamps from the island bring an extremely hefty price, too.

I have both the the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force published accounts of Typhoon Karen that struck with winds up to 250 mph and leveled the entire island back in '62. That was quite a night when she struck, never heard wind howl that much.

Is the Orote Point Peninsula still publicly accessible? Does a Japanese two-man submarine still sit in front of the Marine barracks at Lockwood Terrace?

As you can see, I still have vivid memories of that peaceful little isle where growing up is for adults. Guam is a playground that I'll never outgrow.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hafa Adai Che`lu,

...Well... Let's see, Gab Gab Two is about 100 yards staight in front of Gab Gab 1 (The Swimming Pool) in the harbor. Agat Beach is now called Nimitz Beach, and Orote Point is not accessable to the public, only military.

Not so bad with the wasps any more but they are still here.
Tarague Beach has compitition for the best beach on guam now but it is still the best place to catch lobster if you are a risk taker. We have atleast 5 people drowned up there every year. I think the record is 22 drownings on that beach alone. They post "No Reef Diving" but you get seasoned local fisherman that have been spear fishing for 40 years and they always come back. It is the Air Force Members and their family that are fearless and have never jumped off a reef before that are the ones that do not get back.

My favorite Beach is Ratidian Point. Alot like Tarague Beach but better in my veiw.

Well more later

Chef Kevin
post #10 of 12

hafa adai

hafa adai-
my father is chamorro and ive lost contact with him and i am missing those sweet boonie peppers he used to use to make finadini and kadonpika, if theres any way i mite be able to score some from you please let me know
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hafa Adai Frankie,

Those Doni Peppers aren't so sweet.

There is now way to send fresh produce unless I have a license, which I don't, so you will have to make a trip back to Guam.

Esta Gupa Che'lu

Chef Kevin
post #12 of 12

okay then

i meant sweet in a figurative way...like wow that car is sweet or whoa those shoes are sweet but thats okay...all you gotta do is puree them up and send em in a kool aid canister but if you dont want to take the risk i understand thanks anyways
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