or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Knife Sharpening ... what am I doing wrong
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Knife Sharpening ... what am I doing wrong - Page 3

post #61 of 80
Well I do keep my edge thin. Will try to upload a picture. So I stropped on the fine stone and did the paper test and it's smooth again. I have a feeling that I didn't fully remove the burrs.
post #62 of 80
So I tried slicing scallions again and this time it doesn't slip as much and I think it may be due to the part of the knife in using. I should use more to the center of the blade instead of the tip part.
post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cysoon View Post

Hi Keith, I too own a victorinox and it's as they say very easy to sharpen. I just sharpened mine yesterday and it is very very sharp and the angle I'm using is about 12 degree each side. I sharpen on a 800grit ceramic stone and a fine stone I bought from a Chinese store. My sharpening technique is based on Mino Tsuchida of global knives and I can also say that the edge can last a month or two of heavy use if you're not hitting the cutting board too hard. Watch Mino Tsuchida and try to use his technique, I learned a few sharpening techniques and that is the one I prefer.

I found a video, really glad you posted that, was completely unaware of that person. I'm going to try the technique too once I buy a fine enough stone, which will hopefully be this week if I have the time, but I'm trying to buy a soft-serve machine!!! 

post #64 of 80

Hi @cysoon maybe you didn't spend enough time on the tip or the angle is off.

 

Have a look at this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmBTO0cA_qw

 

People make a big stink about "holding same angle"  and yes it is true to a point.  There is even a whole industry of fixed angle jigs and guides.  But at the tip your sharpening angles will change compared to the rest of the knife.  If you sharpen it all the same, you'll get the dreaded edge pro tip, where the tip of the knife has a wider bevel than everywhere else


Edited by MillionsKnives - 2/8/16 at 3:30am
post #65 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cysoon View Post

So I tried slicing scallions again and this time it doesn't slip as much and I think it may be due to the part of the knife in using. I should use more to the center of the blade instead of the tip part.

From the middle of the blade back is where you should do most of your cutting. The front half of the blade is more of a mechanical aid to cutting motion. The front is useful for actual cutting too, just most of knife technique is focused on the back half of the blade in cutting. It's where you have the most power and control.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #66 of 80

All of Jon's videos should be watched, but this one in particular cavers stropping and burr removal.  In regards to the last, this is really the best method to use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnhIKOX6Rco

 

 

 

Rick

post #67 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillionsKnives View Post

Hi @cysoon
maybe you didn't spend enough time on the tip or the angle is off.

Have a look at this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmBTO0cA_qw

People make a big stink about "holding same angle"  and yes it is true to a point.  There is even a whole industry of fixed angle jigs and guides.  But at the tip your sharpening angles will change compared to the rest of the knife.  If you sharpen it all the same, you'll get the dreaded edge pro tip, where the tip of the knife has a wider bevel than everywhere else
I sharpen the tip at a slightly different angle so my whole knife is even
post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

From the middle of the blade back is where you should do most of your cutting. The front half of the blade is more of a mechanical aid to cutting motion. The front is useful for actual cutting too, just most of knife technique is focused on the back half of the blade in cutting. It's where you have the most power and control.
I feel that if the knife is more German shaped then yes but after years of sharpening my tip area of my fibrox is straightened rather than curved making my knife profile now capable of slicing forward and not as well for rocking
post #69 of 80



Here are some pics of my knife. The blade, edge and the tip
post #70 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

From the middle of the blade back is where you should do most of your cutting. The front half of the blade is more of a mechanical aid to cutting motion. The front is useful for actual cutting too, just most of knife technique is focused on the back half of the blade in cutting. It's where you have the most power and control.
I agree with you. I was trying to practice my techniques and I find that for certain food and cutting technique the tip actually works well too.
I tap slice button mushrooms with the tip. And when I slice cucumbers and tomatoes I drag the knife backwards as I noticed that they do not stick to the knife all this. anyways this is just based on my observation so if anyone thinks these are wrong please do teach me cheers
post #71 of 80

I have no experience with stropping but have used a strop glued to a flat board that's had a "paste" rubbed onto it.  It gave the best edge when the edge was dragged backwards across it, just like stropping a razor.  And I also drag my edge across my oil stones, both my surgical stone and soft arkansas as final touches even when the glued strop isn't used.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #72 of 80

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Hey dude, here Ya' go:  http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Hard-Arkansas-Stone-in-Wooden-Box-P81.aspx
Hey dude thanks for the link but unfortunately I'm in Malaysia so I'm gonna have to find somewhere else
post #74 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cysoon View Post


Hey dude thanks for the link but unfortunately I'm in Malaysia so I'm gonna have to find somewhere else

 

I would still insist on your getting one of those tri-hones.  It'll last you a lifetime.  (EDIT)  And there's nothing like the ease of sharpening on a huge bench stone.


Edited by kokopuffs - 2/12/16 at 8:13am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

I would still insist on your getting one of those tri-hones.  It'll last you a lifetime.  (EDIT)  And there's nothing like the ease of sharpening on a huge bench stone.
Right now I have a 1000 grit ceramic stone, large enough for my knives and planning to get a coarse and a king 6000 grit when I get my salary
post #76 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cysoon View Post

Right now I have a 1000 grit ceramic stone, large enough for my knives and planning to get a coarse and a king 6000 grit when I get my salary

Hey cysoon;where are you buy a decent whetstone at Malaysia if i may know?
post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holynoshury View Post

Hey cysoon;where are you buy a decent whetstone at Malaysia if i may know?
Well to can try your luck at hotel or restaurant suppliers. The ceramic was brought back home by my brother. Just curious, are you Malaysian too?
post #78 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by cysoon View Post


Right now I have a 1000 grit ceramic stone, large enough for my knives and planning to get a coarse and a king 6000 grit when I get my salary


Aaaahhhhhh, your focus is on water stones - Japanese knives.  Me, I use oil stones for sharpening my Sabatiers and Forschners.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post


Aaaahhhhhh, your focus is on water stones - Japanese knives.  Me, I use oil stones for sharpening my Sabatiers and Forschners.
Yup, planning to get a tojiro pro dp soon.
post #80 of 80

cysoon "Right now I have a 1000 grit ceramic stone, large enough for my knives and planning to get a coarse and a king 6000 grit when I get my salary"

 

I have not met universal abrasive stones. Some stones give optimum results with stainless steel, the other is preferable to use carbon steel.

KING PB-04 Dual Combi #800/#6000 for stainless steel (1 min. 33 sec.) 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Knife Reviews › Knife Sharpening ... what am I doing wrong