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What has happened to the FDA???

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
What happened to the FDA, are they nothing but a name growing fat off a pay check. Are there any inspectors anymore watching these food preparation plants catching improper practices or do they just wait for the public to start showing signs of food sicknesses before they go into action. I haven't seen the USDA seal stamped on meat or its packaging in years. Why im I raving, another case of contaminated meat reported again. Will it ever stop!

Back in the 70s you were told not to eat raw chop meat or you will get worms, not cook it until it's chard or it will kill you like today.
post #2 of 33

The FDA has no more meat inspectors, they have been phased out . All the plants are on self inspection which is a farce. FDA does not respond to a problem until after the problem occurs. In other words a recall the contaminated product has already been released to the public and almost all consumed before they issue a recall. They are a total joke. An example is the peanut butter problem years ago > The plant was still shipping and allowed to stay open way after the contaminated product was detected. The plant was filthy and in fact the peanut butter got contaminated by stagnant water leaking into the ceiling from holes in the roof which was like that a long time.

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post #3 of 33

Well FDA and USDA are different.  Many large food production plants have a USDA office on premises.  You also don't get involved with the USDA until you have a certain percentage of meat in your products.

post #4 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 

The FDA has no more meat inspectors, they have been phased out . All the plants are on self inspection which is a farce. FDA does not respond to a problem until after the problem occurs. In other words a recall the contaminated product has already been released to the public and almost all consumed before they issue a recall. They are a total joke. An example is the peanut butter problem years ago > The plant was still shipping and allowed to stay open way after the contaminated product was detected. The plant was filthy and in fact the peanut butter got contaminated by stagnant water leaking into the ceiling from holes in the roof which was like that a long time.

 

 

from related thread...

 

  Can someone show me where all meat inspectors have 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 


There are no more USDA inspectors. They were phased out by the government and meat packers were all put on self inspection.

 

  

 

 

 Hello Ed,

   Can you show me where all meat inspectors were put out of work and replaced by self inspection?  I was aware that this had happened with the Poultry inspectors, But it looks as if beef and pork still have mandatory USDA inspectors.

  thanks,
 Dan


Edited by gonefishin - 8/26/15 at 5:54am
post #5 of 33

The FDA has been systematically gutted by a series of budget cuts which began during the Reagan administration. This article was written in 2007. Since that time there have been more cuts to FDA funding.

 

http://prospect.org/article/who-strangled-fda

 

The Center for Science in the Public Interest has also documented the lack of adequate funding and linked it to food safety issues:

 

http://www.cspinet.org/foodsafety/fdafunding.html

post #6 of 33

Over the last few days, I have watched the media (TV News) re contaminated? beef.  The solution/recommendation) was to cook (or overcook same) to kill bacteria, etc. Now that you mention it, I recall an FDA(?) blue inky stamp that bled all over my fingers.  Have not paid attention or noticed same in years.  I also vaguely remember Mad Cow disease. Eat chicken. ;-)

post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post
 

 Now that you mention it, I recall an FDA(?) blue inky stamp that bled all over my fingers. 

 

Grape juice.

 

mjb.

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post #8 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

 

Grape juice.

 

mjb.


it was actually black raspberry juice.... much darker.... grows mainly in Oregon.

 

Extremely dark pigment allows black raspberries to be used as a coloring agent. The USDA stamp on meat was made with black raspberry dye for many years.

http://www.oregon-berries.com/pick-a-berry/black-raspberry/

 

Luc H.

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post #9 of 33

As @kuan pointed out, meat inspectors are USDA.  They are still stationed in large meat processing plant but their methods (outlined by the government) are antiquated.  There is a push by meat producers to revamp the USDA inspection because it is not scientific based.  Most meat contamination are found by microbiological testing not by the antiquated "sniff test" that the USDA have been using for years.  The poultry industry is self regulated because the inspectors were slowing down the line and they proved that the sniff test does not work.  It's a vicious circle.

 

The FDA deal in non-meat, non-produce, non-alcoholic foods mostly.  The system is reactive meaning all food manufacturers are bound to follow the publicly available regulations. They should expect a yearly inspection.  More rigorous inspections are mandated by complaints. Most complaints are label driven by the competition.  Again, a vicious circle here.

 

Luc H. (I left out many side explanations and details)

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post #10 of 33

    Thanks Luc!

 

  There seems to be lots of people, around the internet, saying that USDA meat inspectors have been phased out.  I'm not sure where this started from, perhaps it was a semi-clever MEME spread around Facebook...or just confusion with some articles being written about the poultry industry.  

 

   I think we all would agree that the USDA needs to jump into the current day.  Are you aware of any new methods being discussed?  I'm not sure I see a way out of this with the current political climate (both sides).  There's so much propaganda on both the consumer and the farmer side that I'm not sure how we will stop this cycle.  Makes me happy I have a close relationship with my local farmers and slaughter house.

 

   On to the FDA...same bunch of complaints and I see no meaningful change in sight.  Only saving grace I can think of here is that this should push a local food movement.

 

 

 

 

    Ed, I'd love to read anything you have that says the meat inspectors have been phased out.  I will even agree with you if I can confirm that they have indeed been phased out and I was unaware.  But if everything points to meat inspectors still inspecting in facilities you've got to quit using the strong wording you have been saying that all inspectors have been phased out.

 

  Dan

post #11 of 33

They used to have an inspector in every plant , now they visit the plant. The government has cut their budget so much' Re. food, chicken as well as meat inspections that it is impossible for them to function. My best friend was a meat inspector , he retired , he was never replaced.  The other matter that should be addressed even more is where the meat comes from(the Source)  Senator David Purdue is very active in this. Our meat comes from Romania, Brazil, Chili, Australia  you name it. How do we even know if it is inspected.  The packers lobbies don't want it to say the source on the label and constantly fight it.  I hope it does not get like imported fish where only 20% OF THE IMPORTED STUFF IS  INSPECTED.  I was told something years ago that I am inclined to agree with. The purveyor told me that contaminated beef is in some cases cooked and then used for fillings in things like pizza rolls, hot pockets etc. If this is true I don't know.?  I do know however that  contaminated meat is taken from the plant by truck to somewhere? Where has never been divulged.

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post #12 of 33

Aannnnd......this is why I only buy local and get to KNOW my farmers and their practices by taking the time out to visit their farms. I also personally get to know my butchers and their practices. They are not the factory meat processing crap plants that everyone still buys from. 

 

I grew up in Canada on a ranch. This was at a time when the government decided to change their subsidies to stock yard cattle instead of our open range cattle (it used to be both stock yard and open range could get subsidies). Killed our livelihood and the meat industry/production as we know it. We knew it was wrong back then but everyone wants convenience as sold to you by the corporations and government to be a good thing. We NEVER had a time where our ranch raised beef, pork, chicken or lamb, even our raw milk, ever made us sick.......quote that "NEVER". The more we get off our lazy convenient arses and get out there to buy local the more "convenient" that type of product will become. Keep it small, keep it responsible. I don't need a government/corporate run inspector to tell me what I intuitively know already.......if you don't take off the horns and hooves and wipe it's arse before you through it on a grill......odds are you're gonna get sick! lol K......end rant.....hehehe 

 

Not saying it is or it isn't, just food for thought (pun intended):

http://rense.com/general33/fd.htm

http://www.globalresearch.ca/monsanto-controls-both-the-white-house-and-the-us-congress/5336422

https://www.opensecrets.org/revolving/

(just some interesting reads, not to be taken for pure factual evidence).......although after reading some of the 1000's of sites like this I feel a need to clean house so to speak....lol :eek:

post #13 of 33

It's so easy to point out weaknesses in a system and not offer (viable) alternatives.

Is the answer to have a government inspector inspect every piece of meat, fruit and vegetable that arrives in a cargo ship, slaughtered or picked in the field? Or is it better to keep a watch on past offenders and manufacturers of at risk foods. Because of this approach, US/Canada and the EU have by far the safest food in the world.

 

There is a great deal of sensationalism in food recalls.  Meat is the worst (best) to attract headlines but in reality there are many recalls that don't make the headlines: see the list of FDA recalls for 2015.

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ArchiveRecalls/2015/default.htm

 

Food safety regulations are based on statistics.  It's a numbers game.  The more tons of a type of food is manufactured/sold, the greater the chances of a recall. Although I have not found a good reference for this, I came across this article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/21/business/recalls-of-organic-food-on-the-rise-report-says.html?_r=1

 

The article explains that organic food recalls will increase because the sale volumes increases (more volume increases the chances of getting more recalls). 

 

We (will) hear more about food recalls because we produce, import, demand, eat and buy more food.  Food safety should be reported as tons of food recalled per tons of foods manufactured then that would give a sense if things are getting worst or better.... but probably not many want to know that 30 000 cattle are slaughtered per day in one processing plant.

 

Food for thought:

Are every airplane crash reported in the news (make the big headlines)? Does air travel become less safe with every crash? How many successful flights are there per crash reported?

 

Luc H.

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post #14 of 33


1. Food poisonings could affect thousands, not simply a plane crash or 2. How can any average citizen offer alternatives when our government is so corrupt and only listens to big money. The government usually steps in after the food is released for consumption. By the time it does anything ,in most cases the food has been consumed. Every regulation that would help the consumer is driven down into the ground by big food business lobbyist,  Tyson, Smithfield, Purdue lead the parade. If the Senate or house speak up against them they will not receive funding from them, and God knows they don't want to loose that. Its all in the name of economics.

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post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
The purveyor told me that contaminated beef is in some cases cooked and then used for fillings in things like pizza rolls, hot pockets etc. If this is true I don't know.?  I do know however that  contaminated meat is taken from the plant by truck to somewhere? Where has never been divulged.

Actually contaminated is the raw material for this company: http://www.beefproducts.com/index.php

they guarantee that the beef is sterile because they us ammonia to increase the pH of the beef which kills every microorganisms (which include pathogens)

http://www.beefproducts.com/ammonium_hydroxide.php

if you are interested in how it's done:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-sbaq7EcE8

(although the plant shown here does not use contaminated beef, the others that have closed did)

 

This is the company that is connected to the term pink slime.  Their customer base included every fast foods burger chain and the school lunch program.

 

Luc H.

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post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 


 By the time it does anything ,in most cases the food has been consumed.

For every need there is an opportunity to make money.  That is fundamentally how capitalism works. 

in the video above, Beef Product Inc. guarantees that every single box of product they manufacture is pathogen free!  They were never part of any food recall ever and with their policy will never be. They gained the trust of the biggest companies in the world.

Is that the answer?

 

Luc H.

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post #17 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

 I haven't seen the USDA seal stamped on meat or its packaging in years.

Is it possible that you are purchasing from a local state inspected meat processor and not from a Federal inspected processor?

(if a processor only sells meat locally within their State they are not required to be inspected by the USDA)

 

Luc H.

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post #18 of 33

this is interesting:

http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/trends/tables-2014.html

 

progress reports on foodborne illnesses for 2014 compared to 2008 (baseline)

http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/pdfs/progress-report-2014-508c.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/foodnet/pdfs/changes-in-foodborne-illness-rates-2014-508c.pdf

 

e.coli O157 (associated to beef) is down nearly 20% in past 2 years and down 30%+ since 2006-08

 

(it must be a conspiracy)

 

Luc H.

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post #19 of 33

It has been a very long summer without my Blue Bell.

Listera is a bad bug and I am proud of them for closing down all the plants not just the infected one.

http://bluebell.com/

 

mimi


Edited by flipflopgirl - 9/1/15 at 4:36am
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

It has been a very long summer without my Blue Bell.

http://bluebell.com/

 

mimi

 

I am not the only one.

Dropping into a convenience store for a last min item and every single one (in my area) has kept the BB freezer plugged in despite being empty.

Local Texas based grocer has left the freezer reach in space empty.

Shoppers congregate and moan...sort of like a memorial at a crash site.

Felt like leaving a teddy bear and balloons lol.

 

But today is the day.

Want to go purchase some but am in fear of being trampled.

 

mimi

post #21 of 33
Thread Starter 
  • 56 oz. cardboard boxes (containing four plastic wrapped packages) marked Oscar Mayer “Selects Uncured Turkey Bacon” bearing the plant number P-9070, the line number RS19 and Product UPC 0 4470007633 0, and with “Best When Used By” dates of 24 AUG 2015 through 26 OCT 2015.
  • • 36 oz. cardboard boxes (containing three plastic wrapped packages) marked Oscar Mayer Turkey Bacon “Smoked Cured Turkey Chopped and Formed” bearing the plant number P-9070, the line number RS19 and Product UPC 0 7187154874 8, and with “Best When Used By” dates of 28 AUG 2015 through 20 OCT 2015.
  • • 48 oz. cardboard boxes (containing four plastic wrapped packages) marked Oscar Mayer Turkey Bacon “Smoked Cured Turkey Chopped and Formed” bearing the plant number P-9070, the line number RS19 and Product UPC 0 7187154879 3, and with “Best When Used By” dates of 3 SEPT 2015 through 30 OCT 2015

  •  
post #22 of 33

according to the USDA plant list this is what I found:

Establishment No./activity: M9070-P9070  Slaughter, Processing

 

Company Name /Doing Business As: Kraft Foods Global, Inc.

Kohrs Packing Company 03/01/2010
Kraft Foods Group, Inc.
Louis Rich Company
Oscar Mayer Foods Corporation

 

address/phone: 3704 Louis Rich Drive Newberry, SC 29108 (803) 276-5015

 

Grant Date: 03/01/2010

 

 

This is the USDA portal: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/inspection/mpi-directory/

found the licensee listing here:

Page 329 of this pdf document: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/a5c2b5c8-92e0-4565-8999-f2fb75bfdb05/MPI_Directory_Establishment_Number.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

Luc H.


Edited by Luc_H - 9/1/15 at 9:22am
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post #23 of 33

concerning meat inspectors this is what I found in the USDA website:

 

Mandatory Federal Inspection

Under the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Poultry Products Inspection Act , FSIS inspects all raw meat and poultry sold in interstate and foreign commerce, including imported products. The Agency monitors meat and poultry products after they leave federally inspected plants.

 

Looks like poultry is still inspected... I was mistaken.

 

reference: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/production-and-inspection/inspection-and-grading-of-meat-and-poultry-what-are-the-differences_/inspection-and-grading-differences

 

Looks like poultry is still inspected... I was mistaken.

 

Luc H.

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post #24 of 33
post #25 of 33
Thread Starter 
Who is watching the produce, now cumbers. Remember few years ago it was pepper corns, what! Don't they have porta potgies in the fields, and wash your hands after
post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

Who is watching the produce, now cumbers. Remember few years ago it was pepper corns, what! Don't they have porta potgies in the fields, and wash your hands after

This is a salmonella outbreak. It has nothing to do with human wastes but rather unsanitary water (probably swamp water) used for washing the produce.

 

Luc H.

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post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post
 

concerning meat inspectors this is what I found in the USDA website:

 

Mandatory Federal Inspection

Under the Federal Meat Inspection Act and the Poultry Products Inspection Act , FSIS inspects all raw meat and poultry sold in interstate and foreign commerce, including imported products. The Agency monitors meat and poultry products after they leave federally inspected plants.

 

Looks like poultry is still inspected... I was mistaken.

 

reference: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/production-and-inspection/inspection-and-grading-of-meat-and-poultry-what-are-the-differences_/inspection-and-grading-differences

 

Looks like poultry is still inspected... I was mistaken.

 

Luc H.

 

 

   I had thought that poultry was currently under self-inspection...I was wrong as well.  

 

 

  I just got off the phone with my slaughter house and they said they couldn't operate if the USDA inspector wasn't there.  They said he is on site every hour that they're open and slaughtering animals...they wouldn't be able to operate, as they do, any other way...she said.

 

  

  I can understand how people may not be happy with some of our current inspection methods, but the amount of inaccurate information that gets passed around, knowingly, is astounding...especially when some people are in positions where they should know better.  The best way to get better inspections methods is not to scare people with misinformation.  Instead it's to educate the population and teach them better methods that can be adopted.  

post #28 of 33

it shows integrity when one admits he has made a mistake

(after re-reading my post above... I see I repeated "I was mistaken" twice by mistake (chuckle)... it has nothing to do with showing integrity but rather my distracted nature)

 

Luc H.

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post #29 of 33

I thought this turn of event was relevant to this thread.

Peanut Corporation executive sentenced to 20+ years in jail for contamination

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/823078b586f64cfe8765b42288ff2b12/latest-families-want-stiff-sentence-peanut-exec

 

Luc H.

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post #30 of 33

I had seen that, Luc.  Nine deaths, over 700+ illnesses...and countless exposed...knowingly...and willingly!  Sheeesh!  It's nice to see the follow through in the sentencing of these individulas

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