or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

These #$%^* Pants!!! - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Barker View Post

Hey Steven! I work at Intro in Chicago ( used to be L2o), everyone wears fitted black slacks. The restaurant I am referring to specifically that does not allow those baggy chef pants is called Grace a 3 michelin star restaurant in Chicago. They also do not allow crocs or birkenstocks. After Grace I staged at 2 other Michelin restaurants (Black Bird and Boka) at both places I saw no one wearing "chef pants". Chicago thing maybe? Either the irritate the fuck out of me, I prefer fitted pants. To me they look a bit more professional. 
Assuming it's a Chicago thing. In NYC most people wear chef pants. I'm curious as to why the ban on birkies. Those are what I wear and I find them professional.
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Barker View Post
 

 

I feel like the higher the level of food you get into the more professionalism becomes a concern in the kitchen, including dress code. For example I've never seen a picture of Thomas Keller, Rene Redzepi, Grant Achataz, Ferran Adria, or Andoni Luis Aduriz wearing a pair of checkered chef pants, or chef pants at all. In some ways playing mind games in the kitchen goes a long way. A lot of times when you dress more professional you act more professional. Take Alinea for example, their kitchen is lined with carpet. Carpet in the kitchen forces to work cleaner, no wiping food debris on to the ground. But I dunno, to each his own. I always loved my crocs but had to put them away for a pair of clarks after finding out they were not allowed at Grace. What does a chef need in his pockets anyways? Other than maybe a notebook for quick access.



Agree with the "level of food" thing.  I've staged at, and currently work for, Michelin-starred restaurants in Chicago, and have worked many other places that haven't been as professional.  I cant remember the last time i've seen anyone wear checkered pants in any of the more professional places. Definitely have seen a mixture of clogs and tennis-shoe-like nonslips at these places.  And what do you need to keep in your pockets?  Why, a notebook, maybe an offset spatula on your sleeve, tweezers in coat, sharpie and backup sharpie, wine key, lighter :)

post #33 of 44

Whats wrong with skirts ?

post #34 of 44

Can one of you provide recommendations for fitted black pants, i.e. brands, sources?  Do you just buy off the rack at the department store or are there chef specific sources?  

I prefer the look of fitted pants but the loose chef pants provide ample room to bend and stretch. Do fitted pants do that as well? 

post #35 of 44


Try The Happy Chef.com

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post
 


Try The Happy Chef.com

I tried it, it doesn't seem like a real website. It was one of those scammy ad websites that buy up expired domains.

 

Have I typed it in wrong?

post #37 of 44

The link should be www.happychefuniforms.com

the company and website are still in business.

post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefwriter View Post
 

The link should be www.happychefuniforms.com

the company and website are still in business.

Thanks for that.

 

I would have never have guessed the "uniform" bit.

 

I will have a look, I have mysteriously outgrown some of my whites.

 

Oh! My aprons still fit.

post #39 of 44
Thread Starter 

Thanks everybody for your help! Greatly appreciated! 

“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
Reply
“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
Reply
post #40 of 44

I would love to be able to wear a skirt at work but I doubt it would conform to SQF standards...  

 

So for falling down pants the best thing I have found is to get one size smaller than what you need to get.  In the beginning your waistband will be a little snug but with time the elastic will wear and you will have comfy pants.   

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
Reply
OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
Reply
post #41 of 44

There is a reason for the elastic/drawstring of chefs pants. It is so it can be pulled down quickly in case of fire, splash or a spill (or in case you want to haze the new comis, just watch out for HR issues). I saw that culinarykid is a student. MOST schools make you wear elastic waist chef pants because of liability issues.

 But most places now will let you wear regular pants cargo pants or dickies. In my region dickies are very popular. they are inexpensive, they wear like iron, look OK, are roomy without looking like MC Hammer pants. If you need chef pants, in addition to the happy chef that other people have listed, try KNG (really cheap and not bad quality) or of course, chefworks. I personally like chefworks the best, but they are a little too high priced. Chefworks exec pants even have belt loops. Their regular pants have very good elastic. Better than other brands. Chefwear are OK, but I'd rather wear the other brands listed


If you can only wear elastic waste pants because of your corporate safety program, empty your pockets, wear suspenders or a belt even if there are no loops or wrap your apron lower.
 


Edited by harrisonh - 11/6/15 at 2:28pm
post #42 of 44
Thread Starter 

Hey guys! Thanks all for your input! I have suspenders for now, but will use this for the future! 

“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
Reply
“The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude.”- Julia Child 
Reply
post #43 of 44

Some really great feedback to a very simple question by @theculinarykid.

 

We had a few more thoughts:

 

·         If choosing a baggy pant option, make sure it has a proper durable drawstring (Spoiler alert: ours has this!)

·         If you really want to avoid the pants from adjusting, go for a standard straight leg pant that has a zipper fly and a button or snap closure (similar to jeans). These pants are meant to fit like regular slacks and will have a more specific fit. Each size of the baggies are meant to fit a wider range of waists. With the straight leg pant, you can also wear a belt as it will have belt loops. We offer both styles. The downside to these is that it is not as forgiving as the elastic waist.

 

You are all "working heroes" to us!

Reply
Reply
post #44 of 44

Use the butchers knot to start the bow and then hold the sides as you pull the draw string to tighten

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs