or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › thawing/storing frozen haddock fillets
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

thawing/storing frozen haddock fillets

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone, 

seeking advice on an issue my restaurant can not seem to fix. For years the restaurant has been thawing haddock in large "bus" style buckets, but the thawed fish ends up sitting in  its own water.

The fish is in such a large quantity and we have limited walk-in space so this is a real dilemma. We are high-volume and sell A LOT of haddock, any ideas on thawing in efficient ways and/or storing the fish in the walk-in for service?

 

Thanks so much 

post #2 of 13
While I havent worked in the states in over 10 years I recall fresh haddock being reasonable in price. Get it fresh every couple days and store in drip bins topped with crushed ice.

If sticking with frozen, thaw in walkin cooler in drip bins in one day use quanities. Maybe pad yourself a half day quanity buffer since you are doing volume business.

Even here in Sweden Haddock is a reasonably priced fish bought fresh.
post #3 of 13


I always put mine in a perforated steam table pan with another pan underneath covered with plastic wrap. When thawed I then kept in same perforated pan with ice on top of plastic not touching fish.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #4 of 13
Forgot to mention the plastic.
post #5 of 13

There are also colored drainage bus pans designed specifically for your use. red for meat, yellow for chicken, etc. The inner one has holes and rests in the outer one. . If I can find a link I'll post it.

By the way, I'd agree fresh haddock would be better as soon as you can find a reliable supplier. Delivered at least twice a week. 

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Floydian1989 View Post

Hi everyone, 
seeking advice on an issue my restaurant can not seem to fix. For years the restaurant has been thawing haddock in large "bus" style buckets, but the thawed fish ends up sitting in  its own water.
The fish is in such a large quantity and we have limited walk-in space so this is a real dilemma. We are high-volume and sell A LOT of haddock, any ideas on thawing in efficient ways and/or storing the fish in the walk-in for service?

Thanks so much 
From the sounds of if you're using so much that a perforated lexan (sp?) container winds up with it sitting in its own juice? If this is the case, I would do the typical perf lexan inside of a solid lexan, but put a perf 400 pan in-between, that should elevate your lexan enough to keep fish out of its juices without making things unstable.
post #7 of 13

Any chance of using fresh? If you are high volume and going through it fast enough, no reason to use frozen is there? What benefits does frozen offer?

post #8 of 13
A perferated insert is the answer, of course- if you're using actual bustubs, buy the right stuff. Lexans, if you're using so much. Best way to thaw fish is laid out on sheet trays in single layers, IMO.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone for responding, looks like i will have to shop around for perforated bins, i have perf hotel pans but the metal stays so cold in the walk in that i think it would slow the thawing process. Obviously i would love to be ordering and receiving fresh haddock, but the price difference is a factor when trying to convince the owner to purchase.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
I might just take the lexan bins we have now and perforate them myself with a power drill....the perf bins online (although i do enjoy yellow) are like 11 bucks a piece and a minimum of six ordered
post #11 of 13
Not to get off topic but if 66$ makes a difference in The operation of The restaurant then there is something seriously wrong with the restaurant.
post #12 of 13

Lagom, I'll take a leap here and say it isn't the $66. It's the buy six at a time. Why buy more than you need? Nothing wrong with being frugal. Plus he gets to use power tools. That's always a good answer. 

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Everyone was so helpful, i ended up finding perforated bins without having to buy in bulk.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › thawing/storing frozen haddock fillets