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Eat more pizza - Page 4

post #91 of 114
BBQ chicjen pizza is goooooood!
BBQ sauce, smoked Gouda, caramelized red onion, grilled chicken, finish with cilantro.
Give it a try.
post #92 of 114


Y'all made me hungry
post #93 of 114

Thursday is pizza night around here so . . . first the sauce - yellow heirloom, some red heirlooms and some purple tomatillas, garlic, salt, pinch of sugar, peperoncino, truffle oil, olive oil, dried herbs - parsley, and oregano all blitzed in the blender and left to rest.  The the topping - queso fresco and mozzarella, uncured pepperoni, basil, crimini and farm red peppers.  

 

 

Couple slices of the pie

 

The crust  . . . ah bing - it's perfecto - t's a labor of love.

post #94 of 114

Getting back to actual pizza, sort of, dinner last night was interesting, I'll just say. One of my favorite ways to use garden fresh tomatoes is fresh tomato pizza. But my wife Karen is under the impression she should avoid gluten and see if she feels better.  So I was at Sprouts, and saw a package of prepared gluten-free old world flatbread pizza crusts or some such wording on the label.

 

Tried them out. The crusts, brush of olive oil, tomato sauce, mozzarella.  Into the oven until the cheese starts to melt, maybe 5 - 6 minutes. Slide them out, place some tomato slices on top, another 5 minutes or so.

 

They weren't that bad. Certainly not as good as a real wheat based yeast crust. I'm looking into some other options.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #95 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

Getting back to actual pizza, sort of, dinner last night was interesting, I'll just say. One of my favorite ways to use garden fresh tomatoes is fresh tomato pizza. But my wife Karen is under the impression she should avoid gluten and see if she feels better.  So I was at Sprouts, and saw a package of prepared gluten-free old world flatbread pizza crusts or some such wording on the label.

Tried them out. The crusts, brush of olive oil, tomato sauce, mozzarella.  Into the oven until the cheese starts to melt, maybe 5 - 6 minutes. Slide them out, place some tomato slices on top, another 5 minutes or so.

They weren't that bad. Certainly not as good as a real wheat based yeast crust. I'm looking into some other options.

mjb.
if you puree cauliflower and bind it with eggs it makes a decent gf crust (cook it before you top it) certainly better for you and more whole foods in it. My experience with gf bread is it making people fat and feel sluggish.
post #96 of 114
It was a thread where i think it was KK who posted about this cauliflower crust that was bound with cheese. So there are a couple of options.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #97 of 114

So which would make a better challenge topic - pizza or casseroles?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #98 of 114
@phatch yes that was me. I would say it wasn't fun experiment, a lot of work and though we were impressed with it we've never made it again. We love gluten-full pizza dough too much.
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

So which would make a better challenge topic - pizza or casseroles?

mjb.

I don't know but both pizza and casseroles are welcome in this month's challenge.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #99 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post

BBQ chicjen pizza is goooooood!
BBQ sauce, smoked Gouda, caramelized red onion, grilled chicken, finish with cilantro.
Give it a try.


Smoked Gouda?!?!? What a great idea

post #100 of 114

In general, I'm not a fan of BBQ Chicken pizza.  There is one exception though and I've posted about it before, but will mention it again.  I do a BBQ Chicken and Corn pizza.  Instead of using bbq sause to spread on my pizza crust I make a corn "cream" that I use.  I juice raw corn kernals and slowly cook the juice.  As it starts to come to a boil it thickens up considerably (sometime too much and I need to thin it out).  I spread this "cream" on the crust then top with shredded chicken, lightly tossed in bbq sauce, thinly sliced red onions, and sometimes tomatoes.  I top with a little sprinkling of cheddar cheese and bake.  Definitely not traditional in any way, but really good!!!

 

 

This one was done on grilled crust and finished on the grill.

post #101 of 114

I'm kind of a purists here.  IMO dough topped with chicken and bbq sauce should be considered some type of open face sandwich even if it's round :)  

 

That said, that dish looks delicious Pete!

If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
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If you make a pizza you can eat for a day.  If you make two pizzas you can eat for a day.
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post #102 of 114

@Hank, thanks!!!  I do have to agree with you though, I am pretty much a purist (although I do love deep dish).  Usually, if I have my choice, it's pepperoni and mushroom, or sausage and onion.  Occasionally I will stray from that but not often.

post #103 of 114

Thanks Pete, your BBQ Chicken and Corn pizza is a wonderful idea to liven up pizza making. What gave you the idea to make a corn puree sauce for your pizza?

post #104 of 114

While I wish I could claim this  as my own invention this is actually a dish that I learned from a chef about 22 years ago.  We also used the corn cream for other dishes, usually thinned out a bit, as a sauce. Another of my favorite dishes that used this idea was a BBQ'd Duck dish we did.  The breast was seared to order, the legs were smoked and shredded and tossed with a North Carolina inspired BBQ sauce.  It was served on Caramelized Shallot Mashed Potatoes and had the corn cream drizzled around the plate.  The somewhat sweet corn sauce was a nice compliment to the vinegary BBQ sauce.

post #105 of 114

Can I just blend fresh corn, or do I have to juice it? I want quick and chunky corn "cream" for my pizza. Have you tried this Pete? Still boil it until it thickens. Maybe accent the sweetness with a pinch of sugar.

 

Hmm...to bromate or not to bromate, that is the question. I guess I'll give it a shot with 12 lbs. from The Creative Pizza Co. That should be enough for a few pizzas and breads. 

post #106 of 114

I hope no napoliteans are looking at this thread.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #107 of 114
There was a pizza joint in West Hollywood (WeHo for the natives) that served a pizza that I cannot find anywhere: the "crust" was the thickest bread crust you've ever seen (2" tall or more), and there was a very very thin layer of simple toppings like tomato sauce, onions and a light handed sprinkle of cheese. I personally would have called that "focaccia" but they called it pizza, and since the name of the restaurant was something like "New York pizza" I always thought that was what's called New York Pizza!
 
I think the joint closed, haven't been in that neck of the woods in a while. Couldn't find a photograph online. 

 

It did hit the spot after a round of the clubs though!!


Edited by French Fries - 9/19/15 at 7:31pm
post #108 of 114

@SundriedFry you can definitely just blend the heck out of it and then either strain, for smooth, or leave unstrained, for chunky.  Be careful cooking it as it will want to burn.  You have to stir it constantly.  I've also done it over a double boiler, but I am usually too impatient for that,  Just don't leave it for even a minute.  As to adding sugar, taste it after it thickens before doing that.  Raw, the juice tastes really starchy and somewhat sweet, but after cooking the vast majority of that starchy taste goes away leaving you with a sweet corn flavor.  Obviously, the fresher your corn the sweeter it will be.  I've found that I only need to add sugar if the corn was really, really old.  You will want to season it with salt, and I usually add just a small splash of acid, usually vinegar, although lemon or lime juice would work.  This helps the flavors really pop.

post #109 of 114
Thread Starter 
Anyone ever make a king Hawaiian crust?
post #110 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

Anyone ever make a king Hawaiian crust?

 

Too fluffy I would think....

 

mimi

post #111 of 114

Would go well with pineapple and Canadian bacon.

post #112 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post

Making pizza from scratch is reaching for me but doesn't seam hard. I more of a buy pizza frozen or at costco. The price of pizzeria pizza has gotten out of control, $18+ for a regular pie, ugh. Costco, walmart and Digiorno ard good alternatives and when you get pack of 3 Digiorno for $13 at BJs or walmart brand $7 even costco for $10 they will remain my choice pizzas. I found these don't seem olive oil based sauce so I drizzle some good olive oil over the pie before backing and it reallg wakes up the flavor. Anyone else had enough of pizzeria prices
I know your pain now dagger. I bought a pizza tonight in long island. Pepperoni and jalapeno. $15, and the ratio of jalapeños to pepperoni was 15 to one, the crust was unsalted, and the sauce was thin and watery. Worst of all the topping fell off the bottom half of each slice as I picked them up. I miss the city.....
post #113 of 114

560bd71b1b00002f00dfde47.jpg

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #114 of 114
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post
 

560bd71b1b00002f00dfde47.jpg

 

I like it - perfect for when you fly.

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