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"frozen dough" pastry / danish

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm trying to interpret an old bakery formula for "frozen dough" (pictured below)

and wondered if anyone might be able to help.

The first ingredient listed is :  "old dough" - what does this mean?

thanks!

post #2 of 13

First off welcome to ChefTalk.

 

Would you share the recipe for us to look at?

 

My guess, without knowing the details, is that some recipes use what is called "back yeasting"

 

If this is a yeast raised product the recipes it utilizes a small amount of leftover dough from the prior batch made to give the new dough a head start on fermentation.

I used to do that all the time in the bakery scene.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the welcome! My family had a bakery in Boston many years ago and this is a recipe from that bakery. I have been unable to find anything like it in my area (South Florida), so when I came across the original recipe, I thought I might attempt to make it.

So, here's a scan of the recipe below- any advice would be appreciated.

 

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

It looks like the scanned image is missing, so I will re-type the recipe:

 

6# Old Dough

1# Sugar

2# Sweetex

1/2 qt Eggs

1/2 qt water

3 oz. Baking powder

3# bread flour

post #5 of 13

Since the recipe has no yeast listed, it appears that the old dough was the way to introduce leavening.  They must have had a yeasted dough culture that they kept alive and used day after day.  Yesterday's yeasted dough was used to make today's pastry but some (6 lb by the looks of it) was saved for tomorrow.

 

But what are they referring to by calling the pastry "frozen" dough pastry? Surely they did not freeze the dough that was held for tomorrow.

post #6 of 13

Old dough = aged dough = sour dough starter??????????????????????????

 

There needs to be some sort of leavening in order to make a croissant (the OP's photo).

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 13

there's 3 lbs of baking powder... that's lot's of leavening!

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc_H View Post

there's 3 lbs of baking powder... that's lot's of leavening!

Luc H.

YIKES... I read the recipe and somehow didn't see the baking powder. Presbyopia I suppose. But its only 3 OUNCES, not pounds! wink.gif
post #9 of 13

Using baking powder, I'd wanna' add some acidic liquid to the mix like either clabbered milk or buttermilk.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Using baking powder, I'd wanna' add some acidic liquid to the mix like either clabbered milk or buttermilk.

No need for an acid when using baking powder (it's included in the mix).

Just humidity + heat is required for baking powder.

 

Baking soda would require an acid.

 

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by prbagel View Post
 

The first ingredient listed is :  "old dough" - what does this mean?

 

 

According to your recipe it's seem that nearly 1/3 of your recipe is made with old dough.

 

You have plenty of leavening in your recipe.

I will take a guess that old dough is exactly that 'old Dough'.... i.e. day old dough.

 

This is what I propose: first make a dough recipe with all the ingredients (minus) except the old dough.  Let rest overnight on the counter (or refrigerate if the recipe requires it).

the next day take that dough as old dough and make the recipe above.  Try it.

 

My guess is you are mixing a very relaxed dough (old dough) into a tight dough (fresh dough) which could be the secret of this recipe.

Luc H.

I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #12 of 13

Lots out there but this was IMO easier to understand.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-ferment

 

mimi

post #13 of 13
Have you had any success with your recipe? I'm looking to make this for my family, but haven't had any luck finding a recipe. We used to have it all the time growing up. Any tips or further instructions would be very much appreciated! Thanks in advance!
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