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Looking to sharpen my new VG-10 knife.

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I am looking for the proper method for sharpening my VG-10 Chiefs knife. I know the basics of sharpening but haven't been able to learn proper techniques for high quality knifes like my new one. Please help!
post #2 of 13

VG-10 is tricky in that it's hard to de-burr.  There are lots of ways to do it, but the basic steps in sharpening anything:

 

Raise a burr

Check that you have raised a burr

Remove the burr

Check you have removed the burr

Flip (for double bevel stuff anyway)

 

If a sharpening method is counting strokes or just blindly grinding away, it's not very good.

 

I would recommend starting here on the JKI playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEBF55079F53216AB

post #3 of 13

... and when your done... a good stropping doesn't hurt either.

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Should I use stone and steel
post #5 of 13

Stone(s) = yes.

Steel = no... except, maybe, for a ceramic honing rod.

 

Leather strop = yes.

Abrasive power = not sure, hopefully someone with more knowledge than me will comment.

post #6 of 13
My deburring routine is several stropping motions on the stone, then pulling the knife through a cork and finishing off by stropping on a leather bench strop.
The only time I've had a problem with a burr was on a carbon knife when I didn't follow my usual routine, what with me being cocky because I was such a brilliant sharpener and all that !!!!
You can replace the cork and leather strop with other materials, such as newspaper etc.
post #7 of 13

I used to use cork.  I don't much anymore.  I just strop with lighter pressure before going to the next stone.  Jon has a video on removing the burr

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnhIKOX6Rco

post #8 of 13

Use Jon's deurring, which I also call the Benuser method because he kept driving it at us.  Once  a thorough job is done with the lateral strokes I'll scratch it with the scour pad or draw it on cork, then do some light stropping strokes on the stone as there will be some truncation to the edge still after deburring.

 

 

 

Rick

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevpenbanc View Post

My deburring routine is several stropping motions on the stone, then pulling the knife through a cork and finishing off by stropping on a leather bench strop.
The only time I've had a problem with a burr was on a carbon knife when I didn't follow my usual routine, what with me being cocky because I was such a brilliant sharpener and all that !!!!
You can replace the cork and leather strop with other materials, such as newspaper etc.

That procedure should do with basic carbons, where the burr, reduced and weakened by flipping it, will easily come off. Don't expect that to happen with VG-10. The burr remains well-attached and can only be abraded, not taken away. Abrade with longitudinal strokes, just very slightly leading to avoid creation of a wire edge on top. To remove the last burr vestiges I use an 8k. End with a few very light edge trailing -- stropping -- strokes.
Edited by Benuser - 9/11/15 at 5:11am
post #10 of 13
I sharpen with 1000, 4000 and 8000 grit stones. I tend to do stropping strokes on each of the stones before moving onto the next one. Don't know if there is any value of stropping on the lower grit stones, I reckon that it can't hurt.
I haven't identified any deburring issues on any of my VG10 knives and I've been sharpening several of them fairly regularly for 2 years now.
Though I do need some new corks.
post #11 of 13

Problem with tenacious burrs is that when by adventure they come off, they leave a fairly damaged edge behind.

post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thank you for all your responses. I am going to start with the basic method of stone and steel and work my way up to the finer methods.
post #13 of 13
Steeling VG-10 will result in an accumulation of fatigued steel on top of the edge, a so-called wire edge. Crazy sharp but will fail after a few strokes, leaving a perfectly unusable blunt blade.
Edited by Benuser - 9/26/15 at 12:43pm
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