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Tempering Chocolate problem (pictures inside)

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

I'm trying to mold slabs of dark chocolate and I'm having problems lately.

It's not the first time I do this, I know how to temper chocolate, but I have a new tempering machine (water/bain-marie) and maybe I'm making mistakes.

 

What I use:

 

Chocolate: Cacao Barry Dark Couverture Mi-Amer (58%)

Machine: dr TF20 (http://www.dr.ca/tf20-chocolate-tempering-machine.html) + Moulding wheel (http://www.dr.ca/moulding-wheel-for-tf20-chocolate-tempering-machine.html)

 


What I do:

 

1- Melt the chocolate overnight (at around 40 C)

2- Dial back the machine temperature to 32
3- Seed with room temperature (21-22 C, I know it's not 18-20 C which is ideal) callets

4- Start the wheel to stir + manually stir

5- Reach 32 C

6- Make my test

7- Test is ok

8- Start moulding in trays (I make slabs that I break in small pieces after)

 

Now usually, the first few trays give perfectly tempered chocolate and after that I get those:

 

 

 

 

This looks like chocolate that wasn't tempered correctly and was too hot when poured.

 

What I don't understand is why it's perfect on the outside and not it the middle, I get it's a little bit hotter there, but t the point of making that big of a difference?

Could it be because I use trays and they are not suited to chocolate moulding? (I did it in the past without problems, but those are pretty flimsy)

 

Could it be because I use a wanter temperer and when I go from 40 C to 32 C, the water temperature doesn't drop as fast as an air temeperer and it reheats the chocolate in the bain-marie while I'm working?

Any help would be greatly appreciated, I'm getting tired of remelting half of my batches, hehe.

post #2 of 4
Your tempering is fine. Your poured couverture is not cooling down fast enough and is suffering from "latent heat build up", which is why the edges are in perfect temper, but the middle is out of temper.

Is the poured slab resting on a hot counter or a hot room?

Can you try to put the poured slab in the fridge for no more than five minutes?
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Your tempering is fine. Your poured couverture is not cooling down fast enough and is suffering from "latent heat build up", which is why the edges are in perfect temper, but the middle is out of temper.

Is the poured slab resting on a hot counter or a hot room?

Can you try to put the poured slab in the fridge for no more than five minutes?

 

Hi!

First, thank you very much for the fast reply. That might just be it.

 

I'm not on a hot counter or hot room, but I'm making 12+ trays, only the first 4 I usually put in the fridge (the ones perfectly tempered), the others are on a rack, after I remove the first 4 from the fridge, I take the other ones from the rack and put them in the fridge, however, the damage is probably already done even if they are cooling in a 22 °C room.

 

With my old tempering machine, my batches were smaller, so I didn't have this problem.

Thank you very much for your help, it was driving my crazy!

 

post #4 of 4

Hello everyone,

 

I don't mean to sound pushy or being misinterpreted, but saw this post and couldn't help but reply.

 

This is a new chocMELTER produced by KREA Swiss, probably a good solution to your problems.

 

 

The chocMELTER warming tank has been designed specifically to heat and maintain chocolate temperature at a range of 20C – 60C (68F – 140F).

The system works with direct air based induction heating, applied from below and all four sides of the tray. 

Equipped with a quality control system and a temperature sensor located “in the chocolate”.

Etc.

 

This machine was built in close collaboration with the Barry Callebaut Academy, so we can also provide some insights about the specifics of the chocolate melting process.

 

If you're interested, you can contact us and we are more than happy to help. If not that's also ok and wish you the best of look for the chocolate tempering. 

 

Best regards.

 

 

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