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Pot Roasts and Mushrooms

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi.

 

When doing braised pot roasts (chuck), what do you folks think about adding mushrooms?

 

Do you think that they actually add much flavor into the mix?  Do you think it's a good flavor?  Bad flavor?  Unnecessary?

 

Or do you think everything else just adds to the flavor of the mushrooms?

 

Odd question, I know.

 

Ray

post #2 of 14

Not an odd question at all. I like mushrooms with pot roasts. Adds good flavor. Either whole to be served with pot roast or pureed into the sauce. A few anchovies added in the beginning add some flavor as well and aren't noticeable when it's all done. 

post #3 of 14
Ditto.

Maggi too sometimes.
post #4 of 14

Love them, gotta have them.  I put dried mushrooms in the braising process, but not fresh ones.  They turn tasteless and lose their firm texture that I enjoy too much.  Instead I sautee fresh mushrooms with butter and thyme and then add them to the pot roast in the last 15 minutes. Plain old criminis serve me fine, can't always afford fancier mushrooms. I do the same with carrots too, I like my carrots a little firm in a pot roast or stew.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 14

Brisket in the smoker? No shrooms. But pretty much every other slow cooked beef dish I do involves them one way or another. Or not so slow, like a pan seared steak with sauted mushrooms. And as I have mentioned before mushroom risotto is the only one where I use a beef based stock.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raibeaux View Post
 

Hi.

 

When doing braised pot roasts (chuck), what do you folks think about adding mushrooms?

 

Do you think that they actually add much flavor into the mix?  Do you think it's a good flavor?  Bad flavor?  Unnecessary?

 

Or do you think everything else just adds to the flavor of the mushrooms?

 

Odd question, I know.

 

Ray

A pot roast, to me, is using a casserole dish or roasting pan, adding carrots, onions and potatoes, and baking/roasting at about 350. Mushrooms are like little sponges and will absorb the flavors of other ingredients & become limp. Here is a general description of same.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braising

 

If you want to add mushrooms in a pot roast dish, you might consider adding them at the end of whatever process you are using.

 

Your call.


Edited by Cerise - 9/13/15 at 11:17am
post #7 of 14

All the time! Tasty stuff and makes the gravy really flavorful!

post #8 of 14
I really like to add them to the Dutch oven as I'm doing my searing. They break down, but that's fine with me as I just puree them into the sauce. The next day I generally serve the leftover bits of meat and carrot in a mushroom gratin.
post #9 of 14

Saute the mushroom caps (remove the stem) in butter and olive oil BEFORE adding them to the pot roast. Gives them a great flavor and gets rid of the excess water in them that can make the pot roast juices bitter.

post #10 of 14

I've found that if you make up a good mixture of sweated garlic, thyme, S&P, and whatever in olive oil. Then sear the outside of the roast to bring out the flavor and juices. Then in a hotel pan or large roast pan.  Add enough beef stock to cover an inch or two up the chuck and bring to a boil to help keep the flavor and moisture but then remove from the stove. As far as veggies. The beef is going to take a few hours or so. So time the veggies accordingly. Carrots usually take the longest after potatoes, celery next, mushrooms take no time at all are delicious as hell(I like Koukouvagia's idea) But remember, potatoes, celery, and raw mushrooms give off a lot of water so take account of that. Otherwise mushrooms are a fantastic addition to your recipe.

post #11 of 14

Like @Koukouvagia mentioned dried mushrooms are a great pot roast ingredient.

Brings an umami component to the party.

 

Versatile as well.

I make a venison pot pie that is great on its own and over the moon with the addition of a rehydrated 'shroom (use a port/beef stock combo) mix .

 

mimi

post #12 of 14
Mushrooms, mushrooms, mushrooms, but what variety there are many.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi, folks.

 

Thanks much for the replies, they are really helpful.  Even helped me come up with a couple of my own ideas to try (most of which go into the trash bags).

 

Thanks again.

 

Ray

post #14 of 14

By adding mushrooms it gives it texture.

 

 

LukeChef

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