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Seasoned Lodge skillet - EVERYTHING sticks...help! - Page 2

post #31 of 45

The problem with modern cast iron pans is the poor finish of the casting. If you took the time to smooth the inner surface of the pan you could then achieve a nice non stick surface. Sanding, polishing and then using flax seed oil will result in a nice pan but is it really worth the time and effort?

 

Buy a nice used griswold pan and be done with it, the casting is much smoother and you can easily achieve a smooth non stick surface. Griswold pans are on the light side <thinner casting> if you want the added weight go with Wagner. 

post #32 of 45

Good point, Toxicant-

I amassed a nice, small collection of Griswolds over the years at yard sales and flea markets... before they became sought-after as antiques. I'm afraid that now you will have to pay prices for collectibles, not just old, used pans.

 

Mike :(

Hey- they're still worth it!

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post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeLM View Post
 

Good point, Toxicant-

I amassed a nice, small collection of Griswolds over the years at yard sales and flea markets... before they became sought-after as antiques. I'm afraid that now you will have to pay prices for collectibles, not just old, used pans.

 

Mike :(

Hey- they're still worth it!

 

Yeah...quite the travesty.

Yard sales aren't what they used to be.

Specially if they pull in an estate sale pro (who said  you have to be dead to charge oodles for your castoffs :cool: ).

Altho for some reason my beloved lace pillowcases and finds like that are still flying under the radar.

 

mimi

post #34 of 45

I just did a search on eBay and there seems to be lots going for less then 100 bucks and most for less then 50.

 

Remember, this will last a life time....I've thrown out a bunch of 15 dollar non sticks in the last ten years,.

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toxicant View Post
 

I just did a search on eBay and there seems to be lots going for less then 100 bucks and most for less then 50.

 

Remember, this will last a life time....I've thrown out a bunch of 15 dollar non sticks in the last ten years,.

 

IMO a CI will never take the place of my disposable non sticks.

Just part of the budget....

 

mimi

post #36 of 45

Something that helps me a lot is using a metal spatula.



 



I use a 3" x 4"  flexible stainless one from my restaurant supply place.



 



I'd read years ago about this, and the theory is that the spatula scrapes off the "micro-bumps" as you cook.  Seems to work well, too.



Most of the time when I finish cooking, I will drag the spatula across the skillet from edge to edge, turn it, and do the same thing.  It really has done a good job on my square 10" skillet and my round 12" one.



 



I'm a little anal about seasoning, so when I get it cleaned up, I dry it on medium burner for a few minutes, then drag lumps of Crisco around the hot sides until there's about 1/4" in the bottom.  I leave it that way until I cook again.  I just melt the old Crisco, pour it into something and go about my business.  Sometimes, if it's pretty clear, I'll just put it back in the skillet after cleanup.



 



Try the spatula thing for a year or so.



 



P.S.



Everyone talks about how smooth and slick great-grandma's skillets were.  No plastic spatulas back then!!



 



PPS.



The flax seed oil is a great idea.  Trick for a new pan is to put it on a heated skillet, then wipe off all you possible can before heating it in the oven.  Repeat as many times as you feel like.  Also used this on the carbon steel skillets.



 



I FORGOT TO MENTION:  When using the metal spatula, I drag it with light pressure.  Don't want to mess with the seasoning too much.


Edited by Raibeaux - 9/24/15 at 8:30am
post #37 of 45

This has probably already been mentioned by the cast iron pros. Sometimes when you have hard water. If you wash  chix, shrimp etc. The least little bit of hard water moisture will leave a film. You will invariably build up a small amount of calcium, magnesium or whatever else in in your hard water. Everything will stick, even with cool oil, hot oil or lots of oil. I have to vinegar down my cast every once in a while especially when the better half decides to wash it.

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post #38 of 45

Does anyone know how to get the sticky oil off?

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post #39 of 45
Don't know what happened to my original post.

Something that helps me a lot is using a metal spatula.
I use a 3" x 4" flexible stainless one from my restaurant supply place.
I'd read years ago about this, and the theory is that the spatula scrapes off the "micro-bumps" as you cook. Seems to work well, too.

Most of the time when I finish cooking, I will drag the spatula across the skillet from edge to edge, turn it, and do the same thing. It really has done a good job on my square 10" skillet and my round 12" one.

I'm a little anal about seasoning, so when I get it cleaned up, I dry it on medium burner for a few minutes, then drag lumps of Crisco around the hot sides until there's about 1/4" in the bottom. I leave it that way until I cook again. I just melt the old Crisco, pour it into something and go about my business. Sometimes, if it's pretty clear, I'll just put it back in the skillet after cleanup.

Try the spatula thing for a year or so.

P.S.

Everyone talks about how smooth and slick great-grandma's skillets were. No plastic spatulas back then!!

PPS.

The flax seed oil is a great idea. Trick for a new pan is to put it on a heated skillet, then wipe off all you possible can before heating it in the oven. Repeat as many times as you feel like. Also used this on the carbon steel skillets.

I FORGOT TO MENTION: When using the metal spatula, I drag it with light pressure. Don't want to mess with the seasoning too much.
post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Does anyone know how to get the sticky oil off?

Sticky oil is oil that is plasticizing. If it's a thin film, just get it good and hot for a while. Stick it in the oven at 500 for an hour and let it cool down. Shouldn't be sticky anymore. If it's on the cooking surface, turn the pan upside down so any excess oil drips out during the heating. You can also do this over a burner on a stove if you have a good vent or on a grill outside. 

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post #41 of 45

.

post #42 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Does anyone know how to get the sticky oil off?

burn it off....

post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allycat659 View Post
 

Ok so I'm new to cast iron and researched the heck out of "seasoning" my Lodge skillet.  I used the flaxseed oil method (Cheryl Canter's version) of:  PURE flaxseed oil (in refrigerated section of Whole Foods so I am 100% certain it was the right kind), Applied oil in UBER thin layer, wiped out the excess, placed it into the cold oven upside down, turned oven up to 500 degrees, started the timer AFTER the oven came to temp and left in for one hour, turned oven off and let the pan cool in the oven for 2 hours.  I did this process SEVEN times.  Tried to cook chicken (in a good amount of oil) and it stuck to the point of my having to PRY it out with my tongs and spatula combined.  I literally had to PEEL it out of the pan leaving the pan FILLED with a thin layer of chicken.  Was complete hell trying to clean the pan out afterwards and it looked "dull" in a few places so...did two more rounds of seasoning.  Researched some more and read that I should cook bacon or something really fatty.  Tried that, and IT stuck too!!!  UGH!!!  I was SO disappointed the pan has been sitting in my over for a month now (because I don't want to see it - reminds me of what an epic failure I am...HA!).  I basically gave up on this after so much effort and wasted time but I really want to love my cast iron pan!!!  Should I just fill it with BACON GREASE and basically DEEP FRY some bacon in the fat?  I'm just at a loss.  The science behind her method, and the multitude of other people who raved about it really sold me.  

 

 

nothing better then some boiling oil to do the trick.

 

Deep fry several rounds of chicken. Or just .... boil some oil in it.

post #44 of 45
Someone once told me the best fat to use to season your cast iron was pig fat. A nice cube of fat back is what I was told to use. I have never tried it because my Pan is so nicely seasoned now I haven't needed to. I used vegetable shortening, not oil.
post #45 of 45

"Someone once told me the best fat to use to season your cast iron was pig fat"

 

Yep Lard...The first seasoning for a new iron or steel omelet pan fry some large crystal salt in lard, let cool and scrub down with a paperbag. Then fry bacon a few times throw in a chunk of lard before the bacon keep the bacon moving.

 

Lard will not enter food if it`s hot. I blacken redfish in a "HOT" pan with lard and believe me you can get lard "HOT".

 

I realize lard is not admired in culinary very much anymore the low fat healthy veg oils are the in thing. Cast iron loves lard this is what i use and right now i could fry a 15 second omelet in any one of my 5 cast iron pans and it will slide right out.

 

 Oh, you know one thing i have noticed. I have 1 Lodge cast iron skillet and it has a ring molded into the bottom. On my glasstop stove my stove has a heat sensor and this ring causes the eye to keep applying the heat to the pan and if i dont manually adjust the temp the contents of the pan will burn. This caused me a huge problem in making a dark roux until i figured it out. 

 

To be truthful the stove manual says dont use cast iron but i thought it probably was in reference to how easy one could break the top with a iron pan. LOL 


Edited by eolian - 9/26/15 at 5:08pm
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