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Staffing problems in the industry... - Page 2

post #31 of 36

With work release they may not work hard but most are eager to be at work all day (and out of jail).  Labor Ready is kind of a mixed bag.  They can put bodies in your restaurant but generally those folks have little to no skills, they literally are just a pair of hands.  I haven't worked with any staffing company that specializes in restaurants. 

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #32 of 36
I haven't HEARD of a staffing company that specializes in restaurants. I don't think one exists. I remember when I first saw Poached it was a bit of a revelation.
post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grande View Post

I haven't HEARD of a staffing company that specializes in restaurants. I don't think one exists. I remember when I first saw Poached it was a bit of a revelation.

Yeah...they've been around for quite some time.

I worked side by side with some of those "rent a Chef" people back in the day. The company that supplied them had different categories so you could have a carpenter, or a cook, or a electrician......

Not all that skilled but, in our situation, at least, they were a pair of extra hands.

post #34 of 36

Hi , "rent-a-chef" was just a generic term i used to describe all temping agencies. The crazy factor came in because i think allot of these guys had borderline personalities that meant they couldn't stay in the same place for very long and so hid in the temping circles. BUT I did have some really good cooks from them as the pay is generally allot better than restaurant pay.

post #35 of 36

Hi Rahul,

 

I'm still trying to wrap my head around this work release.  If I understand this correctly, these are convicts who have been released and may or may not have any restaurant experience, and may or may not stay after you have spent time and energy training them for specific jobs. 

 

O.K. the first rule of thumb is that for every un-experienced worker you have, you need at least 3 experienced ones, or no one will get any work done.

 

However....

 

From your posts, I see a common theme in that "staff" is one big mysterious unexplored lump.  What you need to do is to break up "staff" into kitchen, service, and bar, and each area designated a manager.

 

The experienced restauranteur will have these three key people in his pocket at the stage where s/he is considering 3 property locations--in other words looong before the lease has been signed.  

 

Once you have the key people, you work out a menu and a wine list. 

 

When you have this, you work out what you average guest check will be, and what you can earn on an average night. 

 

Once you have this, you can "budget" how much for rent, for renovations, equipment,

 

And most importantly, how much you can spend for staff.

 

Now each manager has a "budget" of how much they can spend on staffing.

 

Here's the most important thing: Each manager should have the liberty of hiring their own staff, the owner will have final say of course, but each manager is entirely capable of finding their staff, and running their dept. on budget.

 

But anyone who has worked in the industry could have told you this....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #36 of 36

listen to FoodPump. this cook knows things.

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