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The Proper way to Cook Fettuccine Noodles - Page 2

post #31 of 46

That was Steve TPHC

post #32 of 46

Sometimes the simplest dishes can become very complicated - when adding in all the other additional factors.

 

Can you either prepare the entire sauced dish packaged with instructions to reheat at your end, or prepare and serve on site?  Does the client have proper sized pots & pans, etc., and a stove? Other than alfredo sauce, how about a fresh tomato sauce (fresh tomatoes, fresh herbs -basil, oregano , garlic, onion) & fresh mozzarella, or parm-reg or ricotta), pesto, tomato-vodka.


Edited by Cerise - 10/5/15 at 3:42pm
post #33 of 46

I'm stepping in as moderator here.

 

@Katevans74 You've received plenty of good suggestions here.  I would not take anything personally.  Some of the people on this board have 30-40 years of catering experience under their belt.  It would be wise to at least consider their advice.

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

That was Steve TPHC


Thanks for the complement. I find the only time anyone believes what an instructor is telling them is when they are tasting the result for themselves. Althought I teach international dishes, the class most in demand is the Italian (actually its is Roman). What I like most about this food is it is always easy and usually simple. If you send me an email, I will send you a link to free download of my cookbook. (see email address below. Download will be 24MB)

 

By the way, I have another recipe in my book to duplicate the mouth feel of authentic Alfredo that skips the expensive Italian butter. Homemade eggs noodles made from free range fresh chicken eggs straight from the farm are easy with a pasta attachment for one's Kitchen Aid (see http://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-KPRA-Attachment-Pasta-Roller/dp/B00004SGFS)

 

steve@passionatehomecook.com

post #35 of 46

We all hope that high professional standards are held because it reflects our industry for those of us who are working or who are retired/semiretired. Having a food handlers or food managers card does NOT mean the kitchen is certified. It requires a separate certification.

I think ALL of us are on the same page not to sauce early, but we CAN say it in a nice way. We all have our own level of what criticism we can take. With the exception of a few, most of the criticism was CONSTRUCTIVE, but there were a few that might be a little harsh. In fact, I thought mine was harsher than some of the others. But there were a few that were just down right cruel.

I too have noticed that there are some people at cheftalk that CLAIM to be owners/operators but whom I doubt have ever stepped in a kitchen. I've been told I was "full of carp" and ddidn't know what I was talking about because I didn't think a victorinox was the worlds best knife. I think it would have been good to make professionals verify their credentials, but that's too late now. I'm well respected in my town, so I don't care what armchair people who think they're chefs think. But there re many REAL professionals and even talented  amateurs that even old guys like me can learn from.

post #36 of 46

Wait a minute - are you saying the blackened, gluten free chicken with the pumpkin spiced chipotle alfredo isn't a REAL alfredo?

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #37 of 46

I thought long and hard before replying, again. Perhaps my advice was a little harsh, or at least the tone was harsh sounding. I want to share a story with you all.

 

Back in my line-cook days, I had been at a restaurant for about 6 months. It was a fine dining restaurant. I was working pastry. This one day I decided I was going to make cookies and cream ice cream. It happened to be a day when the chef wasn't coming in until around 3:00 PM. He was doing a demo all day.

 

I promptly went to the store and bought a package of Oreo cookies. (I bet everyone that has ever been a chef knows exactly where this is going.) At any rate I made the 2 quarts of the ice cream. When Jim walked in, the chef, as normal he asked me about my station, the prep, the usual stuff. We chatted for a bit, we had an awesome working relationship that became a personal friendship and we are still friends to this day. Anyway I proudly showed him the ice cream.

 

Man he ripped me up one side and down the other. He asked me if I made the cookies. I looked at him and said, no. Right then, at that moment I developed my understanding of what it means to be a chef. He had no problem with the ice cream, his problem is that I opened a package and made a product we couldn't sell.

 

From that point on if I made something, it was from scratch. You know, it's the reason why I know how to cook and the reason why I know how to butcher, and the reason I know how to bake. It's the reason why I was able to work as a cook and sous chef and exec chef on two continents in three countries. It's the reason I was able to work as an exec chef in NYC, one of the most difficult places to make it as a chef.

 

That lesson that day, taught me well. It made me realize the value of doing it right from scratch every time.

post #38 of 46

Just under cook them and let the steamtable do the rest

post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Wait a minute - are you saying the blackened, gluten free chicken with the pumpkin spiced chipotle alfredo isn't a REAL alfredo?

 

mjb.


Yes in my opinion for what is worth that is not REAL Alfredo.  It is a pasta dish most likely a very good pasta dish.  Real Alfredo is a butter, cheese and pasta dish.  This can be confirmed in Webster's New World Dictionary of Culinary Arts.   All meat should be gluten free.  Gluten is a protein composite found in grains.  Remember  opinions are worth what you pay for them.

post #40 of 46
To make authentic Alfredo linguini, start by preparing your own cream of chicken soup, from scratch. 
post #41 of 46

Hello Katevans74, would you please share how everything turned out? I hope all went fine; please share what techniques you employed. Thank you

post #42 of 46

I don't think katevans74 will be back.

post #43 of 46

Oh my .  OH MY!!!!  Creamer chicken versus butter/parmeggiano and perhaps a bit of heavy whipping cream.  Basta pasta vs Mama Luigi's!!!  Goodfellas HELP!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefanthonyd View Post..................................I promptly went to the store and bought a package of Oreo cookies. (I bet everyone that has ever been a chef knows exactly where this is going.) At any rate I made the 2 quarts of the ice cream. When Jim walked in, the chef, as normal he asked me about my station, the prep, the usual stuff. We chatted for a bit, we had an awesome working relationship that became a personal friendship and we are still friends to this day. Anyway I proudly showed him the ice cream.

 

Man he ripped me up one side and down the other. He asked me if I made the cookies. I looked at him and said, no. Right then, at that moment I developed my understanding of what it means to be a chef. He had no problem with the ice cream, his problem is that I opened a package and made a product we couldn't sell.

 

From that point on if I made something, it was from scratch. You know, it's the reason why I know how to cook and the reason why I know how to butcher, and the reason I know how to bake. It's the reason why I was able to work as a cook and sous chef and exec chef on two continents in three countries. It's the reason I was able to work as an exec chef in NYC, one of the most difficult places to make it as a chef.

 

That lesson that day, taught me well. It made me realize the value of doing it right from scratch every time.

 

Even though I'm a home cook, you've learned the difference between being a cook and being a chef.  Me, I'm kinda' an "in between".

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 


Yes in my opinion for what is worth that is not REAL Alfredo.  It is a pasta dish most likely a very good pasta dish.  Real Alfredo is a butter, cheese and pasta dish.  This can be confirmed in Webster's New World Dictionary of Culinary Arts.   All meat should be gluten free.  Gluten is a protein composite found in grains.  Remember  opinions are worth what you pay for them.

This is a pet peeve of mine. People have very strict rules for some dishes but leave others subject to interpretation. Very ambiguous. 

 

It's a debate that has gone on since recipes were developed. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

Wait a minute - are you saying the blackened, gluten free chicken with the pumpkin spiced chipotle alfredo isn't a REAL alfredo?

 

mjb.

Some people think so. 

post #46 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

I don't think katevans74 will be back.

I hope she will; it would be nice to know what actually worked for her.

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