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Beef Shoulder Chuck Roast

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Best Yet market has this for $2.99 lbs. this week and I'm interested in buying one. I read this is a tuff cut of meat and does best in a slow liquid bath but I'm more interested in using my pressure cooker. I figure it would have the same benefit with out shrinking with some fresh veggies. Which way would work out best, letting it site in the broth or putting it on the rack above the liquid? What kind of spice or would rubbing olive oil over it help make in tender before cooking? Every recipe I see seams to point to liquid bath and cutting it into stew size chucks.


Edited by Dagger - 10/11/15 at 11:31am
post #2 of 17

     No matter how you cook it, the beef will be dry if the meat gets too hot.

Low and slow allows you to give the heat time to melt the collagen and connective tissues so the meat becomes tender without drying out the muscle fibers. If overcooked, the meat proteins dry out.  As someone pointed out in another thread, think of the roast as a sponge. If the meat is not overcooked, the fibers of the meat will hold moisture or reabsorb some moisture after resting. But overcooked meat is like a dry sponge in liquid. The moisture can not be re-absorbed.

     Small pieces just shorten the cooking time. 
I would not count on spices or oil tenderizing the meat. But spices and good olive oil will make the finished product taste better. 

I have no experience with pressure cookers. 

post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post
 

I read this is a tuff cut of meat and does best in a slow liquid bath but I'm more interested in using my pressure cooker. I figure it would have the same benefit with out shrinking with some fresh veggies. 

You'll probably want to braise that cut. Google "braising with a pressure cooker". I've braised with and without a pressure cooker, and didn't notice less shrinking with the pressure cooker. IMO you get better results without the pressure cooker, but the pressure cooker does cut the cooking time a bit. It's a compromise. 

post #4 of 17

Low and slow moist heat is your friend.

post #5 of 17
There is a reason why every recipe suggests braising, because it works best. I don't use pressurecookers so I don't know if that will work. But I have braised chuck countless times, ground up, cut into 1-inch chunks and whole as a roast and it's the way to go. Why do you want to use the pressure cooker?

You're kind of like how I used to be with baking. "I don't care what this recipe says, I'm gonna do it my way" and then it doesn't work out and then you have to concede at some point that others know better and you should follow their advice. And now I can make a pie finally, but I had to follow the right steps, not the ones that I think are right inside my head or the ones that I think will make it easier or speed up the process.

Just follow the recipe and braise. It will take more time, yes, but it is inactive time so you don't have to stand ontop of the food, just set it in the oven and walk away for 2-3 hrs.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #6 of 17

I'm thinking pot roast.  Can't help with a pressure cooker.  (It may have come with directions/recipes you could refer to.) Do you have a Dutch oven or slow cooker? I would season and brown/sear on the stovetop, finish/cook in the oven with veggies & liquid of choice.  Here's a simple visual & seasoning ideas:

 

http://www.thewickednoodle.com/chuck-roast/

post #7 of 17

In any case I would recommend you first learn to braise with a normal pan (or dutch oven etc...), where you can lift the lid to check what's going on, taste, and adjust seasoning, or temp, or liquid level, or turn the pieces of meat around if necessary - before you start experimenting with the pressure cooker, where once the lid goes up, you're cooking blind until the dish is finished. 

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 

yeah I got duch oven, so this would work best on stove top like pot roast. I cooked pot roast in the pressure cooker, it was fall apart tender. Doesn't the pressure cooker force moister into the roast?

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dagger View Post
 

Doesn't the pressure cooker force moister into the roast?

No.

post #10 of 17

I always cook chuck roasts at 325 in the oven in a dutch oven or roaster(I have a Graniteware roaster that is 70 years old!). Brown the meat well on both side, put in the roaster or brown in the dutch oven, add liquid about 1/3 way up the meat. Put in the low oven and let it cook for an hour or two then add root vegetables like potatoes and carrots and return it to the oven and cook until tender. I can't give times because the meat will set the cooking time. I use grass fed beef which is leaner and cooks faster. Mom used to put one in at noon and go back to work, she had it at 275. Use the meat juices to make gravy!

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
This has more than 2 sides, it roast shaped. Women in the store said she uses these for chop meat. Told her I did have grinder attachments for kitchen aid stand mixer so she said I should grind one.
post #12 of 17

Did you get the whole shoulder clod? Big hunk of meat!

post #13 of 17

Yes, low and slow.  You know you've done it right when you have a nice gelatinous mass at finish.  

 

Rick

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

Did you get the whole shoulder clod? Big hunk of meat!

It was tied and remember something from ATK about cutting the twine and removing that sliver thing from the meat just can't remember what it's called.
post #15 of 17

Silver skin, it is the muscle sheath and can be chewy when cooked but usually a long braise breaks it down.

post #16 of 17

Why would you monkey around with a pressure cooker?  Just braise that bad boy!

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Well made it in the pressure cooker and it turned out find. Great part using PC everything in 1 pot. Cooked the meat about 90 minutes then removed the meat, put in the basket did broccoli and carrots. Then drained fat and thicken sauce in PC.
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