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Meyer Lemons, Internationally

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Meyer lemons were widely available when I was in Canada but now that I've moved to Europe, I haven't seen them at all.  Ideally, I'd like to have a little tree of my own (by the way of container gardening; I'd have to bring it in in the winter) and I saw a little one in a catalogue once for like, €40 :suprise:.  If a tree purchase wasn't available, buying the fruit on their own would be fine, but I haven't seen them.  Are they referred to as something else?  (For locals: I haven't seen in Hanos, and that was my last resort.) 

post #2 of 11

I did a short search and while there is a lot of interesting info out there nothing pointed to another name.

 

Meyers are in short supply due to a inherent virus (also read that this has been "fixed" so who knows) that can prove deadly to other citrus trees/fruit.

Not often grown for commercial use is what I gathered.

 

My suggestion?

If you are a pretty confident gardener go ahead and invest in one and plant in the largest container you can lift or drag.

This will have to be pruned to keep manageable but then again the smaller the plant the less amt of fruits you will harvest.

 

I found mine (9 years ago?) on a take me home and love me table at a home improvement store.

Keep in mind I live in south Texas....

Brought it home and stuck it in the ground next to my goldfish pond (koi prove too fickle for me lol) and it has grown into a huge shrub (HUGE!).

Babied it for 2 years and have not watered it since (other than rinsing off the dust occasionally).

The fisherman covers it during hard freeze warnings.

The last 2 years has yielded around 1000 fruits.

IMO the roots have grown deep into the cool soil around the pond (maybe the pond has slow leak?) and this is why it has thrived.

 

Good luck!

 

mimi

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

What a great story, Mimi :)  I can't believe you haven't watered it and got so much fruit from it!  I think you're right about it getting runoff from the pond.

 

I was lead to believe Meyer lemons in North America were grown in Florida, but in my search I see they're originally from China.  I would guess they'd also be grown in Spain or Italy (with the warm climate).

 

You're right, I might have to invest.  IKEA has large white (plastic?) square bags for potting that have handles on the side; it'd be perfect for moving.  

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whisked View Post

Meyer lemons were widely available when I was in Canada but now that I've moved to Europe, I haven't seen them at all.  Ideally, I'd like to have a little tree of my own (by the way of container gardening; I'd have to bring it in in the winter) and I saw a little one in a catalogue once for like, €40 surprised.gif .  If a tree purchase wasn't available, buying the fruit on their own would be fine, but I haven't seen them.  Are they referred to as something else?  (For locals: I haven't seen in Hanos, and that was my last resort.) 

Sorry, trying to work with a tablet, Can''t speak for internationally. Here in So California, produce - fruits - abounded at reasonable prices. Unfortunately the ongoing serious drought may have driven up prices and unavailability.

If you have the space and right climate, go for growing it at home.
Edited by Cerise - 10/13/15 at 9:39am
post #5 of 11
n/a
Edited by Cerise - 10/13/15 at 9:39am
post #6 of 11

Sounds like a plan....

:)

 

mimi

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Okay.  Looks like I need to search for a tree that won't cost me my right kidney :rolleyes:

post #8 of 11

Whisked, the home we bought (Southern California) a couple years ago has both Meyer lemon and Eureka lemon trees.  Wish I could send you some Meyers...I actually prefer the Eurekas.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyler View Post
 

Whisked, the home we bought (Southern California) a couple years ago has both Meyer lemon and Eureka lemon trees.  Wish I could send you some Meyers...I actually prefer the Eurekas.

 

Aw, thanks for the thought :) I wish you could, too!

post #10 of 11
You might want to get a kid's wagon and put the container in that for easy moving. I have heard of folks putting all their indoor plants in a wagon and moving them from room to room during the day to follow the sun.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenTOC View Post

You might want to get a kid's wagon and put the container in that for easy moving. I have heard of folks putting all their indoor plants in a wagon and moving them from room to room during the day to follow the sun.

 

Ha!  That's an awesome idea, and true dedication!

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