or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Why would a ganache have so many "sugars"?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why would a ganache have so many "sugars"?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I have discovered cacao mass/ liquor/paste and wanted to try a truffle recipe from a well known chocolate manufacturer.

 

First you add  milk protein ? to espresso coffee, ...then...

 

It says 

200 g glucose syrup (DE 60) 
60 g invert sugar (Trimoline) 
45 g sorbitol powder
Add and dissolve the sugars in the coffee and heat to 35/40°C.

 

What is the purpose of this? Why so many?  And why 2 different invert sugars? + sorbitol.....

 

Then it  goes on to say melt the cacao mass, dark couverture and liquid anhydrous butter (ghee?)

Combine all and you have your gan che ready for your prepared chocolate molds

 

 

I don't understand this concoction at all. It doesn't leave much natural in the confection.

 

 

Does anyone have other truffle recipes using cacao paste?

post #2 of 6
The sugars are for shelf life. Glucose is for flexibility (de=dextrose equvilent), the invert is for shelf life as well as crystalization inhibition (of course honey will do the same thing) and the sorbitol is a preservitive. Typical formulation for a commercial product.

The cocoa mass has zero sugar in it, so you need some kind of sweetner. Honey's pretty good.....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you foodpump,

 

For a batch of home made truffles, could I just use corn syrup, or honey, without the  glucose and sorbitol?

 

Also, can you add this to a regular chocolate ganache, knowing that it will raise the percentage of cocoa butter?

 

And wht  are other applications? I can't find much about it online.

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you foodpump,

 

For a batch of home made truffles, could I just use corn syrup, or honey, without the  glucose and sorbitol?

 

Also, can you add this to a regular chocolate ganache, knowing that it will raise the percentage of cocoa butter?

 

And wht  are other applications? I can't find much about it online.

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalitaji View Post
 

 

 

Also, can you add this to a regular chocolate ganache, knowing that it will raise the percentage of cocoa butter?

 

 

 

 

 

I'm guessing "this" refers to cocoa mass.  Yeah, you can, but you have to adjust your liquid ratio as well.  A ganache is an emulsion, too much fat in the emulsion and it will split.  You can add fruit puree, booze, cream, etc for the water content.

 

Cocoa mass by itself isn't all that pleasant to eat, many would call its flavor "rank".  It's mainly used to boost up the cocoa flavor--in confectionary work as well as pastry work.

 

One of the best books to read on ganache formulation is P. Grewlings "chocolates and confections".  Probably one of the best, most intelligent, well written books I've come across in many years.

 

The Belgian, Wybauw, has several books out on ganache formulation as well.  Two of them deal with long shelf life and go into detail on all of the "weird" sugars.  HInt: Any sugar ending in "ol" is a laxative if consumed in moderate amounts.....

 

Hope this helps....

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you again Foodpump, 

 

I really appreciate your explanations. I have heard of  Wybauw, and will certainly also investigate P. Grewling.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Why would a ganache have so many "sugars"?