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potatoes

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Idaho, red,yukon gold,russet or white eastern. Having sales on these so which do you like best and for what
post #2 of 15

Yukon Gold for mashing and general eating - I like them roasted too.

Reds for  roasting

Russets for bakers or roasting really

 

Hmmm....I think I just like potatoes!

post #3 of 15
This is purely my opinion, but I base my decision on what I intend to do with them. For example, if I want a nice light fluffy mash I will typically grab some russets, Idaho, or reds. I feel like they all kind of fall under a similar umbrella in terms of starch level.

White potatoes seem a little more versatile to me if I'm not sure what I'm going to do with them. Mash them if you like, but I prefer boiling, roasting, pan frying since they are usually firmer inside, but thinner skinned. I'm assuming you are talking medium size, because what I do with a large vs small potato is a huge factor in what I buy.
post #4 of 15

Russets are wonderful for:

Gnocchi

Twice baked Potatoes

Load Potato Skins

Garlic Fries

Potato Chips

Soups

Breads (I have my great grandmother’s recipe for Portuguese Sweet bread that she made with potatoes, or what folks call today King’s Hawaiian Bread and Rolls)

post #5 of 15

Russets for classic baked, reds with leeks for soup, whites, or golds for general purpose.  We don't eat potatoes that often so I stick with the thin, waxy types mostly.  

post #6 of 15

I pretty much agree with most of what people have said here.  Just a few things to add; red potatoes I use for potato salad and roasting, but I don't like them for mashed potatoes as I find the texture gets too gummy.  For mashed, it depends on what I want.  I find that Russets make for lighter, fluffier mashed potatoes, while yukon golds make a denser mashed potato with a deeper flavor, either works well when you add as much butter and heavy cream as I do!!!  Yukons also make great potato salad and roasted potatoes.  I do find that russets are the best "all purpose" potato and can handle most applications pretty well.  Other potatoes, I find, tend to have more "specialized" uses, but often what they lack in versitility they make up for in greater depth of flavor.

post #7 of 15

@Dagger, now I know that you didn't mention Sweet Potatoes, but I seem to have them on my mind.

I was watching Mary Ann Esposito, Ciao Italia on our local PBS station and she made

Sweet Potato Gnocchi tossed with melted butter, chopped Walnuts and crushed Amaretti Cookies on top,

MMM!

That just screams Fall cooking to me. 

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

sweet potatoes stand alone.

post #9 of 15
How about purple potatoes. Keep meaning to look for them and give them a try. Would have been interesting in a mash for Halloween or gnocchi.
post #10 of 15

Roasted/baked, mashed/smashed, stuffed etc.  It was all good when I could eat carbs. I usually reached for russets (in a five pound bag - as they were less expensive, and too large & pricey when purchased individually) or sweet potatoes/yams around Thanksgiving.  There seems to be some confusion re the latter as to a sweet potato and a yam, when I purchase online.

 

I recently came across sheet pan cooking, where multiple veggies, or an entire meal can be prepared/roasted on same.  I think the key to roasting of multiple veggies, would be that everything is uniform in size for even cooking.  An idea to play with for Thanksgiving etc.

 

A potato porn example ...

 

http://www.jocooks.com/healthy-eating/rosemary-balsamic-baby-potatoes-brussels-sprouts/

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

How about purple potatoes. Keep meaning to look for them and give them a try. Would have been interesting in a mash for Halloween or gnocchi.

 

This is an Okinawan Sweet Potato, which is very popular in Hawaii.

Simply boiled whole, chunked and served with Hawaiian foods, such as 

Kalua Pork, MMM.

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
See lot of recipes for roasting gold potatoes, never figured these for that since they don't have a jacket. Looks like some of these could be started in a air fryer.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/yukon-gold-potatoes-jacques-pepin-style-recipe.html
http://www.food.com/recipe/crisp-garlic-yukon-gold-potatoes-326188
http://whatsgabycooking.com/parmesan-roasted-potatoes/
post #13 of 15
Nothing beats a Yukon for me, hands down its my favorite potato and I fry it, roast it, bake it, steam it etc. not good for hash browns though. Yukons are so flavorful and I love their texture.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #14 of 15

I favor the gold but each one has a specific use. Plus its what you favor. As long as the finished product is good, that's all that really  matters

CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

I like the  russet potato cooked in aluminum foil directly on the coals, makes for a crisp jacket. I eat the jacket don't understand why people leave it behind, it adds so much to the potato.  I even ate the skin on sweet potatoes, not as good but why waste it.

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