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Preventing burns in kitchen - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Well Kristine will either change her thesis or go forward. Knowing that in her first phase of the human centered design, the subjects she will be dealing with are a bit egotistical and a little

opinionated. Just remember that the Professional Chefs can be a little pompous and not to inspiring. If your design will work in a professional setting and can be scaled for the home cook you will have a winner. Believe it or not, there was good sucess with those pliable cutting mats and ceramic knives.:D

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #32 of 39

Never mind. 


Edited by jake t buds - 11/7/15 at 1:17pm
post #33 of 39

One thing that just occurred to me:

 

The most common burns I have given myself over the years (aside from oil splatter, bumping hot pans, the everyday stuff) comes from industry standard spring loaded tongs.

 

The "gutter" on the inside of the tongs can act like a funnel for hot liquids that spill out through the open end at the "pinch."   I have been caught several times with this one. This could be something a design element to mitigate.

post #34 of 39

@AllanMcPherson,

 

I'm sure there are plenty of tongs out there with round handles. This past Sunday I finished my last blacksmithing tool. I have made at least a dozen forge tongs for myself.

I'm twisting a bar grouping for a railing next. Now I'm thinking about these tongs. I think I can achieve a spring back with a basic curve. The handles will be just round bar. I will have to do the ends first, then maybe flatten a section of the middle for the spring curve and harden. I'm thinking when I used to be on the hot side I always thought some type of perforated ends would be good.

sorry, bad pics, but fish type slice or perforated ends. Maybe a ball on the ends so they won't slip out of your hands. What do you think. Is this worth trying? The handles maybe 5/16"  X  12".  The ends, similar size as normal ones and cupped a little in a swage block spoon. Who knows,

if they work and look good we can prototype from lightweight heat resistant material.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #35 of 39

ah, I googled heat resistant tongs. There are already a bunch out there. I did not see round handled ones, but I'm sure they are out there.

I just know from smithing that the round handles are very easy to maneuver. 

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #36 of 39

Disclaimer: I’ve made my living with design. Professionally, not just someone with a shop in their garage. 

 

I agree. Commercial kitchens as well as home kitchens should benefit from innovation. But it would be naive to think every product designed is worthy of creation. All I have to say is “disposable flashlights,” or point to the myriad of products sold on TV that are a waste of materials and energy. A sleeve that changes colors does nothing for five or six pans on a stove. They will all be the same color. Hot. In the end, a sleeve might prevent 10% of burns. That, in my opinion, does not solve the problem (sleeves, btw, already exist, yes?). Maybe we should focus on changing the fact that line cooks are underpaid and work in a system that celebrates stress and pressure in a dangerous environment.

 

No new product should be a liability in efficiency.  Shark gloves and pot handle sleeves a liability. Corporate penny pinchers are hired and paid to reduce financial waste. Getting sued because someone cut themselves is waste. Slowing down a line or prep cook is a sacrifice they are willing to make. Then the blame goes to the underpaid, overworked cook when efficiency gets compromised. 

 

I did suggest, by the way, to scrap the sleeve and go with a heat sensitive handle instead. I think it would have more of an impact with home kitchens, but does little to solve the problem of line cooks grabbing a hot pan on a stove because they "forgot." Pliable cutting mats are good for the handicapped or elderly, but create plastic waste. What problem does it solve? Ceramic knives were developed to reduce sharpening, but what happens to them once they've exceeded their useful lifetime? You cannot sharpen them again. Steel can be recycled. Lets not confuse convenience with solving a real problem. 

 

A cage over a mixer makes a ton of sense, but you cannot design stupidity out of humans. 

post #37 of 39
Make a towel tough as leather, with good wet or dry gripping material, blockout heat like welding gloves and easily cleanable. Maybe you should look into kevlar for this idea. Ill be happy to test out your products
Never judge a man until you walk a mile in his shoes, because by then he'll be a mile away and barefoot
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Never judge a man until you walk a mile in his shoes, because by then he'll be a mile away and barefoot
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post #38 of 39
And as far as grip goes, you should have enough hand strength to handle anything with a towel if you work in a kitchen
Never judge a man until you walk a mile in his shoes, because by then he'll be a mile away and barefoot
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Never judge a man until you walk a mile in his shoes, because by then he'll be a mile away and barefoot
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post #39 of 39

 

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