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Paco jet masters????

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

So got a new gig on a yacht which the owner is obsessed with homemade ice cream.  Have a paco jet which the last chef used.  Been cooking in restaurants for 15 years and on yachts for the last 8 years but as the usual I'm weak on deserts.  Always left the deserts for THE PASTRY CHEF do deal with.  Anyways, the more I read into it the more confused I get with the paco jet.   I understand the principle.  My issue is is that on the internet there is crazy information about it.  Regular ice cream bases don't work?  It turns out like soup, add gelatin and all kinds of molecular stuff to make ice cream??  Do it at the last minute or spin it 2 hours before???  ect, ect.   I'm not a pastry chef but just need a tried and true recipie from real chefs making vanilla ice cream with a paco jet.  If I have to add chemicals and the end product is good I don't care.  I just need a solid recipie.  The boat charters for 250,000 a week so I can fail or be playing around with a glorified ice cream maker.  Thanks

post #2 of 20
Thread Starter 

sorry last sentence,  CAN'T FAIL

post #3 of 20
I use my Pacojet frequently. Most ice cream recipes work fine without adjustments, spin it a few hours before you serve.
Exceptions include certain ice creams with high fat, like brown butter or white chocolate. These varieties can work, but may need adjustments.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 


Any recipes for vanilla ice cream base??  Been searching the internet and there are just so many recipes out there.  I have limited time and am cooking for 10 crew everyday before the owner gets here so a recipe that works will help me out a lot and no guesswork.  After that I can add flavors.  Thanks,  Mark

post #5 of 20

Ratio:  2 egg yolks, 2T sugar, 1c 50/50 milk and cream.  Vanilla..

post #6 of 20

Kuan beat me to it.  But I'd rather teach you how to fish then feed you fish...

 

Classic vanilla ice cream is nothing more than frozen crème anglaise, a.k.a. custard cream.  There should be plenty of recipies on the internet for anglaise, right?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks food pump and Kuan.  I understand your analogy but pastry are not my thing, It's a science and an art that I have great respect for and leave it to the professionals with a passion for it.  I have about 12 go to deserts that I do, know they work and look good on yacht charters.  The reality of yachts is there is no time for experimentation or some last minute desert failure.  For the amount of money people pay for the week things have to be perfect.  I have 10 crew I have to cook for daily so there is no time to play with sweet things.  That's why I was just looking for a solid recipe plain and simple ,and advice from experience. 

post #8 of 20
Fair enough. But what did you have in mind when you asked for a simple basic vanilla I/C recipie?
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 


That's it, a vanilla ice cream base paco jet recipe  There are a lot of recipes out there for the paco jet with stupid molecular recipes.  Kuan, have you used that recipe on a paco jet?  Just need something that works everyime and tastes good.  Thanks

post #10 of 20

Yes, about that.

 

Also bear in mind that I'm a saucier, so things like all of these things like emulslification sauces and souffles and stuff like that can be handled by a saute person.  Don't underestimate the what you can learn and do on the hot line.

 

Also, by the same token I don't really do "recipes."  ;)

post #11 of 20

BTW you need to show us pictures of this yacht.

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 


So once again thanks for the help.  Kuan have you used this recipe in a paco jet??  This next week is my experimentation week and build base's week before the owner comes.  In the end I still haven't got any solid information as of yet.  Don't worry pastry chefs I won't take your recipes to the next great restaurant or go to shark tank.  This is the reason I don't like baking, everything becomes complicated, I just asked for a solid paco jet vanilla ice cream base, the most simple thing, that's it??

post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 

At this point I'll take any good ice cream or sorbet recipes that anybody has.  Cheers

post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

Fair enough. But what did you have in mind when you asked for a simple basic vanilla I/C recipie?


A simple basic vanilla I/C recipie

post #15 of 20

No I've never used it in a pacojet.  I've just used a regular ice cream machine.  I don't see why it won't work in a pacojet though.

 

And, OMG that yacht is sweet.  How's the kitchen in there?

 

Also also, pacojet site has recipes.  http://www.pacojet.com/en/recipes/Ice-creams.php I assume they are all tried and time tested.

post #16 of 20

@hookedcook, Trust me, any vanilla ice cream recipe is going to work in the Pacojet, but to make you feel better, here is a recipe for vanilla ice cream that has been used on the Pacojet: (funny how the Pacojet website has ice cream recipes, but none of them are vanilla!):

http://www.thestaffcanteen.com/chefs-recipes/pacojet-vanilla-ice-cream-2

 

I can see how you might be overthinking this whole thing, because you sort of seem to have a fear of desserts (which I completely understand, having worked with the hot side for over 20 years....the pastry side is a different animal to be sure), and also when you get on the internet and get deep into pastry forums, it can leave you more confused than better informed....I totally get it. It's amazing how some people can turn the most simple thing into an overly complicated web of confusion. The vanilla ice cream recipe I linked to is pretty much like any other ice cream recipe out there. Just in case you're not familiar with the term "caster sugar", that just means superfine sugar. If you don't have any, regular granulated sugar will work just fine, since it gets dissolved in the cooked base anyway. If you don't want to use vanilla pods, just sub in vanilla extract; it will be fine. 

 

I've never had the opportunity to work with a Pacojet, but I asked my pastry friends who have, and they concur that you don't need to sweat this. Cheers!

post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 


Thank you chefpeon!!  I know its the basics of basics but was just looking for a no brainer tastes great works every time recipe for an amateur pastry guy.  I see your in Washington, spent 8 months there waiting on a yacht to get finished in Raymond/ Westport area.  The captain and I had a rule,  if it ever stopped raining we would drop everything and squeeze in a quick round of golf!  Thanks again

post #18 of 20

I really like the knowledge on this website. Excellent. 

 

I'm available to assist on that yacht, btw. Any job openings hookedcook? I need to get away from it all. I mean really get away. 

post #19 of 20

@hookedcook, you're welcome! I know a lot of people who cook on boats, since we're heavy into the marine trades up here. I know how you need to have the tried and true stuff ready to go,

because there's definitely no time to experiment when you're out on the water. Glad I could help!!!

post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jake t buds View Post
 

I really like the knowledge on this website. Excellent. 

 

I'm available to assist on that yacht, btw. Any job openings hookedcook? I need to get away from it all. I mean really get away. 

 

No sorry, Its a solo act until the yachts reaches 180 to 200 feet then you have a sous chef. After 250 ish you have a sous chef and add a crew chef and that's it.  It's cool though, you are your own boss (but always answer to the captain!) as long as the crew is feed and happy and the owner/guests are happy and the galleys clean its your own deal.  For an example, they had a crew meeting this morning,  I was the only one who didn't have to go because it doesn't have anything to do with me.  For younger single chefs with no ties I definitely recommend it.  No rent or bills, travel around the world and the moneys good.  Plus its nice to personally pick out each vegetable, fruit, meat, and usually moneys no object buying ingredients. Also fishing and spearfishing and fresh seafood is a bonus.  It makes you a better chef and always using new ingredients around the world.   There is a different kind of pressure than a restaurant so it can be stressful at times but not 600 covers a night stressful!  It's 100 % on you and you are dealing with owners and clients who frequently eat in the best restaurants in the world.  You pretty much live in a shoe box with no privacy. Also when you work you work, crew always have to be feed even when owners/ guests are not onboard.  But its a fun lifestyle.  I take at least 4 months off a year and find some place cheap and interesting in the world to travel chill out and relax, then repeat the process     

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