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question for UK cooks (or steamed pudding fans) - ok to use vintage pudding boiler?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I'm a Canadian with no experience making steamed puddings. I don't have a 'pudding basin', but I do have the Queen's Pudding Boiler, No. 16.  Would this work as a pudding basin? or do you think it might too old and delicate for long-time boiling?  The bowl  doesn't have any cracks. Should I line the lid with parchment etc.? Pointers for steamer or recipes would also be welcome!

 

I found this picture on the internet, it's the same as my bowl.

 

post #2 of 8

It's good to see another steamed pudding fan. I've posted a couple of question s on the topic and from the lack of responses it appears that we are as rare and uncommon as are fruitcake lovers (which I also am).

 

I would not hesitate to use that tool, with or without the metal lid. And, yes, parchment between the pud and the lid.  When boiling, just make sure that it isn't sitting on the bottom of the pot of boiling water. I use a wok rink to elevate my basins from the bottom.

 

This weekend my goal is to make a stem ginger pudding.  What are you making?

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Good to know it's ok to use  the boiler! I thought about using one of the recipes from here - www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/christmas/christmas-food-and-drink/9688444/The-best-Christmas-pudding-recipe.html

 

Since it's a vintage bowl, Eliza Acton's 1847 recipe sounded good!  I looked at April Bloomfield's but it calls for Barley wine. I have no idea what that is. Maybe it's some kind of beer?

 

I wish I had my grrandmother's fruitcake/steamed pudding recipes. My husband loves fruitcake, so I'm make  Alton Brown's this year.

 

Do you have a favourite?

post #4 of 8

I've seen Alton Brown's recipe and heard a few say that they like it. I've never made it myself, though. My favorite is from Geoff Smith (The Frugal Gourmet). Here it is:

 

http://www.food.com/recipe/bourbon-fruitcake-402737

 

p.s.  the recipe says "keeps for months".  I've kept it wrapped and refrigerated or frozen for as long as 12 months. It changes over time - getting mellower and more complex as time goes by.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by summer57 View Post
 

Good to know it's ok to use  the boiler! I thought about using one of the recipes from here - www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/christmas/christmas-food-and-drink/9688444/The-best-Christmas-pudding-recipe.html

 

Since it's a vintage bowl, Eliza Acton's 1847 recipe sounded good!  I looked at April Bloomfield's but it calls for Barley wine. I have no idea what that is. Maybe it's some kind of beer?

 

I wish I had my grrandmother's fruitcake/steamed pudding recipes. My husband loves fruitcake, so I'm make  Alton Brown's this year.

 

Do you have a favourite?

Yes Barley wine is a very strong beer typically around 10%, my Grandmothers favourite tipple! I remember sneaking a sip of it when I was young and found it less bitter than my Grandads beer almost sweet ...

I now know it is less "hopped" than a regular beer and so less bitter than a normal beer, so if you couldn't source it you could probably substitute with a small amount of Malt extract.

I hope this helps you a bit.

post #6 of 8

OMGoodness.....my gran would have LOVED that basin. She could never afford a proper one so she just used a muslin cloth the REALLY old fashioned way! She made the BEST puddings. We never refrigerated ours as that was uncalled for if you store it in a cool, dark environment. We just rewrapped it in new muslin wrap and kept it hanging until we were ready to serve it, then we re-steamed, served in brandy base. 

 

I have her recipes for Spotted Dick, Christmas Pud (aka: fruitcake or plum pudding') and Treacle Pud (my all time fav).

 

As @BrianShaw has said please use parchment in between your pudding and lid as well as the reminder to not let the pudding jar touch the bottom of steam basin. I use a small anchor hocking prep bowl on the base of mine, they are able to handle the heat. The wok base is a perfect idea though so I am going to borrow that. :D

 

Parallell 49 Brewing Co. as well as Central City Brewery both have a great Barley Wine and they are local to you.

 

I hope you give it a go and tell us how it all turned out :)

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
 

I've seen Alton Brown's recipe and heard a few say that they like it. I've never made it myself, though. My favorite is from Geoff Smith (The Frugal Gourmet). Here it is:

 

http://www.food.com/recipe/bourbon-fruitcake-402737

 

p.s.  the recipe says "keeps for months".  I've kept it wrapped and refrigerated or frozen for as long as 12 months. It changes over time - getting mellower and more complex as time goes by.


Smith's recipe uses chocolate! Great idea! Just might try that one!

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
 

As @BrianShaw has said please use parchment in between your pudding and lid as well as the reminder to not let the pudding jar touch the bottom of steam basin. I use a small anchor hocking prep bowl on the base of mine, they are able to handle the heat. The wok base is a perfect idea though so I am going to borrow that. :D

 

Parallell 49 Brewing Co. as well as Central City Brewery both have a great Barley Wine and they are local to you.

 

I hope you give it a go and tell us how it all turned out :)

Thank you! Great excuse to check out the local craft beers! I'll definitely make the Bloomfield recipe!

And  the wok base, also very easy to find here. Thanks  to everyone for your great ideas!

Alexis

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