or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Risotto - Page 2

post #31 of 53

so , for me risotto or anything original recepie ,I can be Make doing to do.......

for example  if I do the bred whit a steak , onions ,tomato, end Mayonnaise , ...I can' not call cheese burgher,,

is only a goo Sandwich.......

post #32 of 53

I recently saw an heretic making "potato risotto".

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

I recently saw an heretic making "potato risotto".

 

I would so make that if I really felt like spending the time making a brunoise!

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #34 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ordo View Post
 

I recently saw an heretic making "potato risotto".

 

post #35 of 53

Risotto is a technique, not an ingredient. 

 

Most types of grains can be cooked risotto--farro/spelt, barley, fregola, Isreali cous cous, orzo, etc. The variations are endless. Rice is most common but not the only one. 

post #36 of 53

FWIW, fregola, Israeli couscous, and orzo are actually pastas; not grains.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #37 of 53

May be a technique, but the very word "risotto", comes from "riso" (rice). Here's some interesting data:

 

http://www.italyheritage.com/traditions/food/risotto-milanese.htm

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #38 of 53
This conversation has gone in my least favorite direction -->authenticity

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

This conversation has gone in my least favorite direction -->authenticity

 

There's a worst direction: tradition. Respect the tradition or else...!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #40 of 53

It is one thing to be steeped in tradition. And a totally different thing to be embalmed in it.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

FWIW, fregola, Israeli couscous, and orzo are actually pastas; not grains.

 

Yes, true. But they are made from...grain. So I dunno, if you want to get deep in semantics about it. They could be labeled as "grain products" or whatever. 

 

My point was to say that the technique of risotto can be applied to many different types of grains and grain derived products. 

post #42 of 53

The best risotto I ever had was a butternut squash - mushroom risotto in Scotland. I would go back just for that risotto.

post #43 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by niklas View Post

Looking for variations of to make risottos!?

What recipe are you currently using?

Take a look at risotto alla Milanese via Saveur etc. - good read re saffron and how the dish got its, name.

Re variations - take a look at orzo "risotto" There's an interesting variation on a "popular" food blog using orange zest. Lemon would be my choice.

Also, take a look at risi bisi.
post #44 of 53
Can you make risotto in a pressure cooker?
post #45 of 53

My guess is that cooking rice in a pressure cooker would turn it into glue.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #46 of 53

Yes, I've made risotto in a pressure cooker.  It was good, not gluey or mushy. Here's a version I made -- http://www.hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooker-risotto-in-7-minutes/ 

and the vegetable risotto from here:  http://modernistcuisine.com/recipes/pressure-cooked-vegetable-risotto-2/

The modernist cuisine page also describes how to use different grains, such as spelt, barley, etc. but I haven't tried those versions.

post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsBirdChat View Post

Can you make risotto in a pressure cooker?


Yes. I've done it, it works fine. 

post #48 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

What recipe are you currently using?

Take a look at risotto alla Milanese via Saveur etc. - good read re saffron and how the dish got its, name.

Re variations - take a look at orzo "risotto" There's an interesting variation on a "popular" food blog using orange zest. Lemon would be my choice.

Also, take a look at risi bisi.
At work we doing it like this " i don't like this method" we boil the rice in a pot with lots of water, until it's almost Al dente. Then we wash away the starch:( cool it down. Then we have a pre made sauce thickened with corn flower, that's substitute for the starch we washed away before. It works but I rather do it in a traditionally way.
post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by niklas View Post


At work we doing it like this " i don't like this method" we boil the rice in a pot with lots of water, until it's almost Al dente. Then we wash away the starch:( cool it down. Then we have a pre made sauce thickened with corn flower, that's substitute for the starch we washed away before. It works but I rather do it in a traditionally way.

 

Yikes. Why do that I wonder? 

post #50 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post

Yikes. Why do that I wonder? 
Yeah i know it's not the best:( but the head chef wants it that way, so it's not much I can do. Apperntly it's easiest that way because we use steamed rise for other dishes, so it would just be more prep time.
post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by niklas View Post


Yeah i know it's not the best:( but the head chef wants it that way, so it's not much I can do. Apperntly it's easiest that way because we use steamed rise for other dishes, so it would just be more prep time.

 

Well, I certainly don't agree with your chef or his/her reasoning, but I DO agree with you towing the line and doing what they expect of you. Yes chef, indeed. But yeah, I don't get it. 

post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by niklas View Post


At work we doing it like this " i don't like this method" we boil the rice in a pot with lots of water, until it's almost Al dente. Then we wash away the starch:( cool it down. Then we have a pre made sauce thickened with corn flower, that's substitute for the starch we washed away before. It works but I rather do it in a traditionally way.

Sad to read this.  I wouldn't call this a variation, more of a b*****rdization. But look on the bright side - at least you have learned what not to do in your own restaurant someday.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #53 of 53

For me, as long as you have good rice and a decent stock/decent wine, it's like the fried rice of the Italian world.  Great for emptying out the fridge and experimenting with combinations.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking