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Commercial kitchen designs?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Im planning to convert a storage space into a kitchen for a bake house for rent. The place was left unused and it has been a good reason to use as an income generating space. Now the point is im not savvy in interior designing and decoration stuffs. I recently consulted a home renovation company, Gta Closets in Toronto to design the kitchen. It seems that they need a clear picture of a commercial kitchen from me, which im not sure of. The thing is I called them up to check out for a design. They gave ideas but they didn't suite my taste. Now that they ask for a idea from me, im vague. I hope chefs could have better understanding of the kitchen designs. The kitchen area is 22X15 approx I guess. Inviting ideas and suggestions!
post #2 of 7
IMO nobody is going to be able to effectively help you design your kitchen space without knowing exactly what it is product-wise that you're going to accommodate, what kind of equipment you're going to be needing, and something about the arrangement of the space itself.
You may not need an exhaust hood for instance, if you're not going to have open burners etc.
I have designed commercial kitchens for people through email, using only a scale drawing
showing all dimensions, placement of doors, vents windows, any plumbing etc.
But even that is just the beginning. Very hard to do without at least some visuals.
I'll also add that most home renovation companies don't have the first clue about designing a commercial kitchen space--the needs, the codes, etc. You need a commercial kitchen planner for that and a lot of them don't know what they're doing either, so talk to several.
post #3 of 7

The design usually happens after you decide cuisine and what equipment pieces you want to purchase. A designer must have all the trades together and available so they can decide if it's physically possible to put things where the designer places them. I wouldn't spend a dime on equipment before that is decided. Utility supply cost,plumb., elect,.etc, especially in residential, can far exceed the cost of equipment.

Most important thing!!!! If you use a kitchen designer, make sure he or she is not associated with any type of equipment supply house.

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post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

Most important thing!!!! If you use a kitchen designer, make sure he or she is not associated with any type of equipment supply house.


Why? These are the people who actually design commercial kitchens for a living. These are the people who know all the municipal building codes, and the health codes. These are the prople who deal on a daily basis with plumbers, electricians, hvac, and floor/tile people, they deal with mech. engineers, structural engineers, and the interior design people. Yes they will charge you for their services, yes they will waive their fees if you buy X$ worth of equipment. So what?

Architects have no idea about commercial kitchen design, and have no knowledge of the codes that pertain to commercial kitchens.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 7

@foodpump ,

Here the kitchen designers are almost obsolete. Most have gone residential.

It's the same thing as titling yourself chef. Kitchen design people here are playing designer, ya know, like party planner, wedding planner.

Most of them are glorified commercial restaurant equipment sales reps The real design know;edge now comes from your contractor. Which

now are even specializing in just commercial kitchens.

  This is just here now. There still may be reputable kitchen designers in your area. But  somebody with kitchen experience can lay out

especially with the help of an app. The few kitchen design people I met at the last food show could probably not tell you what potable water was or even where they locate grease traps.  There was this booth that had equipment. They had a bunch of inline/indoor floor grease traps piled up. I asked the" designer" if she was installing any of those and she told me absolutely. I asked, "here in town?" oh yes.

My wife and I just laughed because they are not code anymore here.

  I totally made a mistake in my last post that said a designer must have all the trades together. I meant to say contractor.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #6 of 7
I dunno about that. My last and current kitchen install the plumber claimed to have extensive knowledge of commercial, kitchens. Eejit wouldn't hook up the hand sink to the grease trap. When I pointed this out, his response was something like "I know what I'm doing, you go and cook something". I had to go online and print out the city's regulations on grease traps. Only then did he change. If he didn't, he would never have passed inspection, and he would have billed me for the extra work.

Same thing for the electrician on my previous build. I stipulated very clearly on my bid sheet to " supply and install fluorescent lighting fixtures with a shatterproof and washable lens". As per health requirements. Eejit goes and gets fixtures with naked fluorescent bulbs. I point this out and his arguement is that all the supermarkets ave the exact same fixtures Hadda go online and print of the health boards regulations for him.



If you know what you're doing, you don't need a general contractor. If you don't know what the city and health inspectors want, you have alot of trouble on your hands.......
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 7

yea, it was like that until a few years ago. Now you can't just submit plans anymore, if the health department is involved they come out to the site and then you have to go pull permits for everything. That's why some of the local contractors are trying to do just kitchens. The trades can pull permits for other stuff but when it comes to kitchens, I wouldn't trust anyone. The cost for fixing mistakes would be too great. Our grease traps are now one size fits all. Even a little hole in the wall has to have the trap outside and the smallest ones are the size of a volkswagon.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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