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chicken soup

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

How to make the best chicken soup ever?

post #2 of 24

Well first you need an egg.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 24

Lots of ways to take this. 

 

What have you liked best in the past? 

 

Are you willing to make your own stock? Can you debone a chicken? If not are you willing to learn? 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 24

It's all about the quality of the chicken. 

post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post
 

Well first you need an egg.

 

So true!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 

It's all about the quality of the chicken. 

 

So true!

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #6 of 24

Slow poach a whole chicken.

post #7 of 24
Don't forget to remove the feathers. They tickle your nose. smile.gif the best chicken soup I ever ate was grandma's. As I recall she went to a kosher butcher(?), put it in a big pot on the stove (cut up), added water to cover and seasonings of choice, adding veggies (carrots, onions, celery) and simmered on the stove top for several hours until almost fall off the bone. Remove the skin and bones and cut into bite-sized pieces. If you like, use a defatting cup to save the schmaltz to fry potatoes etc. I like the addition of dill and a squeeze of lemon juice.

In the meantime, make your matzo balls or big fat slippery noodles. Add them to your soup about 20-30 minutes before the soup is done. It's more of a go by mouth-feel and taste dish.
.
Edited by Cerise - 11/17/15 at 3:19pm
post #8 of 24

The shrink wrapped chickens at most grocery stores are sorely lacking in flavor.

These are bred to grow fast so of course have almost no taste.

 

Purchase

Find a stand alone meat market with free range birds.

Why not the supermarket free range?

Because the mom and pop places have to stand on their rep..... once that goes so goes the store.

If they have a few chicken feet hanging around buy a few of those as well... lots of added flavor.

 

Make stock

Take the bird home and rinse the heck out of it as there will always be some leftover bits of offal stuck to the ribs (and liver in the stock is NASTY) then plop the entire bird in a largish pot and add enuf water to cover.

You will need to flavor this water so clean a few onions, carrots,celery and rough chop and add to pot (these will be discarded so don't waste your energy trying for perfect).

Cover and bring to boil and then simmer until the bird falls apart and the veggies have given up all flavor.

No salt just yet as when this is reduced later you may end up with a salt lick.

 

I like for the above to sit for a day in the fridge (tastes better IMO) so I pour it off in a big SS bowl, allow to cool for a bit and then cover and find room in the fridge for an overnite rest.

 

That is how I start.

Anyone want to take the next step?

 

mimi

post #9 of 24

Forgot the herbs....

Tye up a small grab of parsley, bay leaves and thyme then toss into the mix with the veg.

You may want to add other fresh herbs but this is what I like at this point.

 

mimi

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

Don't forget to remove the feathers. They tickle your nose. smile.gif the best chicken soup I ever ate was grandma's. As I recall she went to a kosher butcher(?), put it in a big pot on the stove (cut up), added water to cover and seasonings of choice, adding veggies (carrots, onions, celery) and simmered on the stove top for several hours until almost fall off the bone. Remove the skin and bones and cut into bite-sized pieces. If you like, use a defatting cup to save the schmaltz to fry potatoes etc. I like the addition of dill and a squeeze of lemon juice.

In the meantime, make your matzo balls or big fat slippery noodles. Add them to your soup about 20-30 minutes before the soup is done. It's more of a go by mouth-feel and taste dish.
.

On the subject of Kosher chickens, I have always had the best luck with flavor from these over any other chicken I have ever worked with.

The flavor is far and above anything that sells in the other meat counters.

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

Don't forget to remove the feathers. They tickle your nose. smile.gif the best chicken soup I ever ate was grandma's. As I recall she went to a kosher butcher(?), put it in a big pot on the stove (cut up), added water to cover and seasonings of choice, adding veggies (carrots, onions, celery) and simmered on the stove top for several hours until almost fall off the bone. Remove the skin and bones and cut into bite-sized pieces. If you like, use a defatting cup to save the schmaltz to fry potatoes etc. I like the addition of dill and a squeeze of lemon juice.

In the meantime, make your matzo balls or big fat slippery noodles. Add them to your soup about 20-30 minutes before the soup is done. It's more of a go by mouth-feel and taste dish.
.

On the subject of Kosher chickens, I have always had the best luck with flavor from these over any other chicken I have ever worked with.

The flavor is far and above anything that sells in the other meat counters.

 

Do you think it has anything to do with the bleeding technique?

 

mimi

post #12 of 24

I think it has to do with the salting. They're essentially dry brined. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #13 of 24
Wanted to mention, I watched Martha s on pbs this past weekend making chicken soup, etc.as mentioned, the onions, carrots, celery was strained halfway through cooking into the broth and then discarded. Yikes. I get the reason why - to infuse the broth with flavor. Later same fresh veggies were added to the broth again. Interesting.
Edited by Cerise - 11/18/15 at 3:10pm
post #14 of 24
Sorry. Don,t know where my long post reply went.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

Wanted to mention, I watched Martha s on pbs this past weekend making chicken soup, etc.as mentioned, the onions, carrots, celery was strained halfway through cooking into the broth and then discarded. Yikes. I get the reason why - to infuse the broth with flavor. Later same fresh veggies were added to the broth again. Interesting.

Sure....you're basically making a chicken stock, then turning it into the soup.

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

Wanted to mention, I watched Martha s on pbs this past weekend making chicken soup, etc.as mentioned, the onions, carrots, celery was strained halfway through cooking into the broth and then discarded. Yikes. I get the reason why - to infuse the broth with flavor. Later same fresh veggies were added to the broth again. Interesting.

Sure....you're basically making a chicken stock, then turning it into the soup.


The veg have given all they can and are mushy to boot  :cry:.

If you like you can cut fresh (pretty!) veg and add those in then simmer until tender.

 

My 2nd husband (the farmer ;-) came from a huge Czech  family and the oldsters took turns making homemade stock and thin egg noodles for the family reunion (always held during the cold/wet months when you couldn't get into the fields to do anything).

A stockpot full of a clear, delicate and so flavorful chicken broth with nothing but a bit of parsley floating for color alongside a dish of thinthinthin egg noodles.

Serve yourself some noodles (Is that all you are going to take? You peck like a bird ! ) then ladle in the steaming broth to warm them up.

Tried to get custody of that noodle recipe but it was a no go.

 

However as Gma K had taught me her kolache recipe and they couldn't dig it from my brain I got to keep it  :D.

Good times good food good beer!

 

mimi

 

 

mimi

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 


The veg have given all they can and are mushy to boot  :cry:.

If you like you can cut fresh (pretty!) veg and add those in then simmer until tender.

 

My 2nd husband (the farmer ;-) came from a huge Czech  family and the oldsters took turns making homemade stock and thin egg noodles for the family reunion (always held during the cold/wet months when you couldn't get into the fields to do anything).

A stockpot full of a clear, delicate and so flavorful chicken broth with nothing but a bit of parsley floating for color alongside a dish of thinthinthin egg noodles.

Serve yourself some noodles (Is that all you are going to take? You peck like a bird ! ) then ladle in the steaming broth to warm them up.

Tried to get custody of that noodle recipe but it was a no go.

 

However as Gma K had taught me her kolache recipe and they couldn't dig it from my brain I got to keep it  :D.

Good times good food good beer!

 

mimi

 

 

mimi

This is the way I grew up. My Mom would 1/2 simmer/boil a whole chicken and serve that broth with a bowl of cold egg noodles to cool the broth. She would take the 1/2 cooked chicken and roast it for the dinner. I think this was a way to fill us up with the broth and noodles to stretch the chicken dinner to feed 5 people. GGGEEZZZZ those Czech's didn't waste anything.....

post #18 of 24

I like buying whole chickens as it is easy to get several dinners for the two of us out of one bird. And bits that go in the freezer until there is enough for stock.

 

Boneless, skinless breasts are to chicken what Velveeta is to cheese.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #19 of 24
quote name="ChefBillyB ... GGGEEZZZZ those Czech's didn't waste anything.....
[/quote]

Neither did the Hungarians. smile.gif My Grandma probably would not have thrown away good cooked food. Maybe I missed a step. What do I know. I was probably still learning to find my nose and tie my shoes. Ha!
Edited by Cerise - 11/28/15 at 1:11pm
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

I like buying whole chickens as it is easy to get several dinners for the two of us out of one bird. And bits that go in the freezer until there is enough for stock.

Boneless, skinless breasts are to chicken what Velveeta is to cheese.

mjb.

I will take the chicken breasts, but you can keep the Velveeta. lol.gif
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post

quote name="ChefBillyB ... GGGEEZZZZ those Czech's didn't waste anything.....
[/quote]

Neither did the Hungarians. smile.gif My Grandma probably would not have thrown away good cooked food. Maybe I missed a step. What do I know. I was probably still learning to find my nose and tie my shoes. Ha!


Most people from Europe that came over to America didn't waste food. They knew how hard it was to come by at one time in their lives.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 


The veg have given all they can and are mushy to boot  :cry:.

If you like you can cut fresh (pretty!) veg and add those in then simmer until tender.

 

My 2nd husband (the farmer ;-) came from a huge Czech  family and the oldsters took turns making homemade stock and thin egg noodles for the family reunion (always held during the cold/wet months when you couldn't get into the fields to do anything).

A stockpot full of a clear, delicate and so flavorful chicken broth with nothing but a bit of parsley floating for color alongside a dish of thinthinthin egg noodles.

Serve yourself some noodles (Is that all you are going to take? You peck like a bird ! ) then ladle in the steaming broth to warm them up.

Tried to get custody of that noodle recipe but it was a no go.

 

However as Gma K had taught me her kolache recipe and they couldn't dig it from my brain I got to keep it  :D.

Good times good food good beer!

 

mimi

 

 

mimi


Now I want Kolache......and maybe some nut and poppyseed rolls........My Mom made these at Easter.......After reading this post and it being 20 degree overside, chicken soup became a good idea.

 

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post


Most people from Europe that came over to America didn't waste food. They knew how hard it was to come by at one time in their lives....


Now I want Kolache......and maybe some nut and poppyseed rolls........My Mom made these at Easter.......After reading this post and it being 20 degree overside, chicken soup became a good idea.



So true. Your soup looks delish. Can't get that from a can.,

My mom and grandma would add kreplach to the homemade chicken soup. The kreplach were similar to wontons (or pelmini ((sp)). A dumpling filled with ground meat, that can be fried and served as a main dish, or boiled in the soup or added to the soup.
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cerise View Post


So true. Your soup looks delish. Can't get that from a can.,

My mom and grandma would add kreplach to the homemade chicken soup. The kreplach were similar to wontons (or pelmini ((sp)). A dumpling filled with ground meat, that can be fried and served as a main dish, or boiled in the soup or added to the soup.


I was wondering why I never had kreplach, it's a jewish type dumpling. They do sound good!. 

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post


I was wondering why I never had kreplach, it's a jewish type dumpling. They do sound good!. 

Try it. You'll like it. Lol. They.re similar to pelmeni (Russian/Czech/ukraIn?) Or potato pierogies - which are good in French onion soup (believe it or not).
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