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A proper brownie recipe

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Just wondered if anyone can give any insight on a really good brownie recipe that works in a pro kitchen using a standard brownie Rational tray. one thats going to reheat ok in a busy service etc and be consistent and all that stuff. Basicaly i'm not a fan of the one im told to make at work but can never seem to get brownie right, despite being a fairly good pastry chef. Its really annoying coz i like to understand methods rather than just throw it in a bowl and mix it together but I keep messing up this recipe, and lets face it a brownie isnt really that complicated. Anyway would appreciate any help.

post #2 of 7

Look around for one that uses brown as well as granulated sugar...... the brownies FLY out of the case (so addictive!).

Melt the butter then add sugar and rest of ingredients.

One bowl...what could be easier?

 

Chocolate is fickle and easily scortched.

Pull when the crumbs in the middle are still pretty moist.

 

mimi

post #3 of 7

Maybe it would be helpful if you shared the recipe and technique you are using and we could troubleshoot it. Brownies aren't that complicated, you're right, but there are different recipes that give you different results. For instance, are you wanting a more fudgy brownie? Cakey? Chewy? What is it that you don't like about the one you are making now?

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the response. l think the main problem is they come out cakey. I do the basic method of melting the chocolate with the butter over a bain marie. whisk the eggs with the sugar until quite thick, fold the chocolate mixture into the eggs then fold in flour. i think in most recipes it basically follows this method, I could be wrong? 

post #5 of 7
I've made the kind of brownie you describe in lots of places I have worked, and I've never been fond of them personally, so I hear what you're saying. I've tested out lots of different brownie recipes, and the King Arthur Fudge Brownie recipe is my hands down all time favorite. I never add in the chocolate chips in the end though. Overkill and makes for higher food cost.http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/fudge-brownies-recipe
post #6 of 7

I like a lot of the KA recipes...always turn out as they employ a great test kitchen group.

Sub out 1/3 of the granulated white sugar with light brown.

It will caramelize and not only taste great but will help with the fudgy factor.

 

Cannot stress enuf how important it is to not overbake....

Stick an oven thermometer in there and adjust the heat if needed.

If you follow the recipe exactly as written they will be done at the noted time.

One of the many pluses of small batch baking.

 

mimi

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by somechefguy View Post
 

Just wondered if anyone can give any insight on a really good brownie recipe that works in a pro kitchen using a standard brownie Rational tray. one thats going to reheat ok in a busy service etc and be consistent and all that stuff. Basicaly i'm not a fan of the one im told to make at work but can never seem to get brownie right, despite being a fairly good pastry chef. Its really annoying coz i like to understand methods rather than just throw it in a bowl and mix it together but I keep messing up this recipe, and lets face it a brownie isnt really that complicated. Anyway would appreciate any help.

 

I don't have the exact recipe but I saw a pastry chef do a pretty straight forward brownie with almonds and the texture and consistency was great. (I'm NOT a pastry chef BTW!)

 

Her Basic Brownie Method:

Pate a Bombe egg yolks and sugar

Baine Marie chocolate and butter

Sifted flour folded in thirds with blanched almond pieces

Baked in a heavy terrine-like mold

 

The only difference between this method and most brownie recipes I think is the pate a bomb making a more refined texture and the lack of egg whites. I'm assuming the ratio of butter/chocolate was a little higher to compensate for no egg whites "setting up" the brownie once cooked and cooled. The heavy terrine-like mold also helped bake it gently so the edges were tender with little maillard.

 

The surface of the brownie had very little cracking and as far as the texture it was pleasantly in between cakey and chewy/fudgy.

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