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Displaying Macarons in shop

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hi Guys,

 

ive seen many shops selling macarons. Laduree and Pierre Hermes in london both have these flat surface serve over counters. My question is, are they chilled?

Do Macarons need to be displayed in a chilled counter or would a normal glass display counter do which is not chilled?

 

Many thanks 

Naeem

post #2 of 21

It will depend on the filling you use in each macaron however, I always displayed in a chilled case as most of my fillings were cream or butter based. 

 

To answer the question of Laduree surface counters being chilled, YES they are. 

post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for that. Most of my macarons ae either cream based or chocolate ganache so I think a chilled display would be good. I'm trying to find something similar to what laduree have. Like a surface counter but I can't send to find any or I just don't have he correct name for them. I've tried on ebay and general Google but no luck 😕
post #4 of 21

They are a custom made product. They usually use a type of stone like marble or quartz and it sits in a stainless steel-like custom contraption that is the refrigerated unit. It is an expensive design and really only useful for those that have the money and numbers to afford a display like those. I eventually did this in my storefront however, I did have to save to do so. I made mine with white quartz and glass. It cost me well over 20K to custom make it.

post #5 of 21

You might want to look up sushi cases; or deli cases.  The refrigeration in a pastry case is different from a deli case.  The deli case has the "shelf" chilled versus the pastry case which has cold air circulating around the shelves. So perhaps a counter top sushi case might be an inexpensive alternative to a custom case if your budget doesn't run to custom just yet. Or talk to a local chocolate shop and see what they are using for refrigerated cases.

post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks guys. a custom fridge would be too much right now. A sushi/deli display chill unit is good but would just offer limited space incase i wanrted to display anything else. 

Ive come across Trimco chocolate/truffle display fridges which are quite good. would these be suitable for macarons? it says that the temperature range is  +14/+16. would that be ok?

 

thanks again

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 

thanks guys. a custom fridge would be too much right now. A sushi/deli display chill unit is good but would just offer limited space incase i wanrted to display anything else. 

Ive come across Trimco chocolate/truffle display fridges which are quite good. would these be suitable for macarons? it says that the temperature range is  +14/+16. would that be ok?

 

thanks again

post #8 of 21

I am not trying to come across as a mean person however, from all the questions you are asking it really sounds to me like you are NOT a professional baker nor pastry chef and would appreciate you not trying to pass yourself off as one. It takes us professionals proper training, time and experience to become a pastry chef. Much appreciated if you change your moniker.

 

The proper display temp for macarons that are buttercream or ganache filled is +4 which is regular fridge temp. The +14 would be for jam filled macarons.

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 

i think it is a little mean purely because i have trained and taken classes to make macarons and cakes and perfected them but have just never thought of opening up a business so its the commercial and shop equipment im now familiar with. thats where i thought a forum like this would be of help. 

i run an online business and have been trading for 2 years but again not on a commercial scale. 

if its causing an issue im happy to change it and im sorry if ive offended anyone. It wasnt my intention to do this. 

 

thank you for your advice also. 

 

regards

post #10 of 21

@bakerstcakes There is a forum for culinary students if you haven't yet seen that. This forum is for professional pastry chefs only. If you have never worked as a professional pastry chef, then you should not post here. There is a notice at the top of the forum if you haven't seen that. Also, if you post your question on the baking and pastry forum, a lot of us pros also participate there and can answer questions. Thanks.

post #11 of 21

What does Professional mean ?

 

pro·fes·sion·al
prəˈfeSH(ə)n(ə)l/
adjective
 
  1. 1.
    of, relating to, or connected with a profession.
    "young professional people"
    synonyms: white-collarnonmanual
    "people in professional occupations"
       
  2. 2.
    (of a person) engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime.
    "a professional boxer"
    synonyms: paidsalaried
    "a professional rugby player"
     

I think bakerstcakes qualifies, give him/her a break. 

post #12 of 21

This is becoming a big problem on the pro forums period.

There are 3 pro forums on CT.

That is a small amt when weighed against the rest of the site.

 

I believe OP was a home cook until she/he changed the title to student.

Some just title themselves "other" and that seems to pass muster.

IMO a pro would be one who not only takes but gives advice as well ....

Until that tipping point is reached the best places to ask about how to vet equipment and choose recipes should be one of the many forums dedicated to those questions.

Like @chefpeon noted most of the pros post on those forums as well so the OP will be getting more advice anyway.

 

mimi

post #13 of 21

@pjm333 Then all the OP needs to do is change their moniker from "culinary student" to "pastry chef". The rule is there for a reason and if you apply it randomly, then there

is no real reason for the rule in the first place. 

post #14 of 21

Oh the rules, its amazing how someone can take this stuff so seriously. 

post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by pjm333 View Post
 

Oh the rules, its amazing how someone can take this stuff so seriously. 

 

Talk to @Nicko ....

He has his reasons I am sure.

So we read them and follow them in order to participate.

Our choice.

 

mimi

post #16 of 21

Pretty straight forward "request" more than a rule. We want pros to have a place to discuss with other pros and we ask the community respect this.

 

Using myself as an example I am in IT and I work on a website that generates over a hundred million a year. When I want to discuss a new javascript framework I want to talk with people who have actually worked with it at the enterprise level. Not someone who built a personal blog and toyed with it. Same principal here.  Regarding the chef forums, I was a professional cook/chef for 15 years and after being out of the business for so long I don't post in the pro forums at all. It just isn't the same. Sure I have years of experience but you forget a lot and the industry changes. My personal opinion is what I have to offer just isn't as relevant as it was 20 years ago. In short if you want to disrespect the pros and change your title you can but we ask that you not post in pro forums if you are not working in a professional setting.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #17 of 21

Just to update you all. @bakerstcakes and I have resumed conversation on the PM setting so that we may clarify things and not have it clog up a valid thread in this forum. My reason for saying what I did was it was coming across that this person did not know the Food Safety rules of how to store and hold pastry product. However, as we have talked more she is a lovely and capable person who is NOT a certified pastry chef but a wonderful passionate pastry lover who owns her own company. So this is what I said to put as her moniker: Owner/Operator as this is what she truly is. 

 

What are your thoughts on how to properly hold and display macarons? What moderated temp unit should be used......a +4 or a +14/16 unit?

 

I kept my macarons at +4 piled high in my refrigerated slab open display unit. 

post #18 of 21
Thread Starter 

Many thanks to you all for you understanding.. 

i do apologise once again.. I thought as i was venturing out into a business it would be useful to ask professionals and get some advise. something less experienced chefs wouldnt be able to provide. Fable has been more than helpful and i cant thank him enough. 

 

nicko - i totally understand your point of view and the explanation you have given is bang on. hence, i asked my question in this forum and not the others. I had questions only certain individuals with experience and knowledge would have answers to. im trying to setup a working business and take what i have now to a more commercial level. I thought i would need someone with experience and knowledge of doing that so i came in straight to this forum and dropped the question here, thinking i wouldnt get many individuals with the knowledge to answer them in the culinary student section. I accept i shouldnt have advertised my self as a professional chef but but i only did as i couldnt ask the urgent questions i needed answers too in the other forums as it wouldnt allow me too. 

 

i hope that makes sense. im new to this site and didnt know the exact rules of posting so that was my over sight. 

 

if anyone would like to see the things i make here https://www.instagram.com/bakerstcakes/ is where i have most of my business and where ive traded for more than 2 years now being the only place in the midlands in the UK who make handmade macarons i also do cakes too. i work as a  teacher full time and dedicate my evenings an weekends to baking. i will be leaving my job to take this on full time and want to start on the right foot with some help and guidance which i thought i would get from here. Individuals like fable are an inspiration and i admire the knowledge he/she has. 

thank you all and forgive me for my short comings. 

 

ps fable i'm a 'he' not a 'she' :D. nothing to worry about though :)

post #19 of 21

It has often been my thought to create a forum where new business owners could discuss ideas with existing pros Maybe that is what we need.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #20 of 21

@bakerstcakes hehe, my apologies as well for the assumption of 'she' instead of 'he' lol   I still stand by what I said about being a lovely and capable person however!! Beautiful cakes BTW ;) 

 

@Nicko I think that would be a wonderful idea as we have so many threads started for just that purpose :D

post #21 of 21

@Nicko, what about a forum called "Ask the Chefs"? Anyone could pose questions there and pros who feel like it and have the time could answer.

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