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Stir fry video

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I meant to say his lunch for school, and convection, convection.  :)

 

I add the garlic after because it will burn in that hot pan.  If I were using a real wok with a real burner I can start the garlic on low and immediately raise the heat.  This is not possible with a standard stove.

 

post #2 of 11

Great video @kuan

 

I moved to a place with a horrible electric stove so now I do a lot of cooking on an outdoor burner 65k BTU on a real wok.  I find if I add garlic and ginger at any time other than the end it ends up burned.  Any tips?  Do you move it up to the sides when  you move other ingredients in or...

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

You have a carbon wok?  Start the garlic on low in the wok, then turn it up when you put your main ingredients in.

post #4 of 11

Yeah it's carbon steel, round bottom.  I'll give it a try tonight.  What's made a big difference so far is blanching the veg so I don't need to stir fry it as long.  Then the aromatics don't have time to burn.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Oh I see.  I normally do the veg separate then combine.  The combining takes like 15 seconds, there isn't much cooking involved.

post #6 of 11

Ahhh okay so stir fry the veg, take it out (or move it up the sides), then the garlic and combine.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Do the veg and remove.

 

Quick rinse/wash the wok.

 

On low, add oil, garlic.

 

Turn to high, add main ingredient and cook how you would normally do it.

 

Dump the veg back in and stir quickly.  It's done.

 

You need to cook using the convection and flame.  Some of the oil droplets need to catch fire a bit, that's what gives it the wok taste.

post #8 of 11

Thank you for sharing! I had no idea the flames catching some of the oil was part of wok cooking. Now I know. :)

post #9 of 11

Garlic is often added first over lower heat, then removed. Just so it flavors the oil. The later you add it in the cooking, the more pronounced the flavor is in the dish. There'ts not one right way to cook the garlic, just what result you're looking for. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 11

Nice! Love your stoves and set up, kuan. One thing i've being experimenting (with meats) is adding the water-corn starch mix seconds before completing the stir fry. It seems i can get a better velveting that way without the burning. Regarding garlic, the size of the cutting makes a huge difference.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #11 of 11

That is a nice looking cooktop.  I often do garlic twice. sort of. Crushed cloves in cold oil to start. On the heat. When the cloves are toasty brown remove, the oil is ready to cook. Sometimes I eat them, sometimes toss in the trash. Then have another batch of garlic in the form appropriate to the dish, minced, slivered or whatever. I really need to get a good, basic carbon stell wok like I had decades ago that probably disappeared in a move.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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