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Marrow Bone Information, Please

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hello, folks.

 

Was wondering about what you could tell me about marrow bones.  I have been wanting to try cooking them for years, but never got around to it.

 

Questions I have include:

Which bone(s) are best to use, and does the age of the cow (large, small cow) make a difference

How large a diameter is best,

What length is best,

Methods of cooking, bake, simmer, etc.,

Suggestions on how to use the marrow,

Anything else I might want to know, though it's obvious I know nothing about them, so I don't really know the questions to ask.

 

 

I have access to plenty of bones.

 

Thanks if you can help, this is really something I want to do before I'm told I can't eat it.

 

Thanks again.

post #2 of 4

Veal marrow bones are the best.  The marrow bone is usually from the arm or the femur.  Larger the better of course.  :)

 

It's really simple, but in general, I don't think you can get the butcher to specifically get you those cuts.  They normally come in a case of veal bones for stock and you just save the better ones.

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

Hi, thanks for the reply.

A friend custom slaughters, and I can get whatever bones I would want on occasion, so that part is pretty much taken care of.

For the best bone, I'm assuming that the thicker the bone the better, right?

Thanks.

post #4 of 4

Hi,

since you are interested in marrow, I suggest you to try "ossobuchi alla milanese" and "risotto alla milanese con midollo di bue" two traditional northern italy recipes that involve marrow in the preparation in two different ways.

 

Both from the city of Milan, in the north west of Italy:

 

the first one is sliced veal shank sauted with butter and a brunoise of onion, carrots and celery, the meat it's a real joy to eat and sucking the bone marrow from the bone hole (ossobuchi = bones with hole) it's the final prize... :-));

 

the second it's the tipical Milan brightly yellow risotto with saffron and of course ox marrow that gives the risotto an incredible creamy consistency;

 

They usually go together, but you can also choose to serve ossobuchi with simple boiled rice and reserve the risotto alla milanese for another occasion...

:-)

 

Hope you'll enjoy as i usually do!

 

P.S. I apologize for my poor english

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