ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Equipment Reviews › Favourite uses for Food Mill / Mouli?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Favourite uses for Food Mill / Mouli?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I just bought a food mill (= a mouli) for soups. I'm told they're useful in making jam (jellies) too.

Does anyone have a favourite use for one of these?

In case there's any confusion, it's a stainless steel rotating mill that pushes food through one of three discs with holes in them.

I'd love to hear from you!

Plum.



(Edited to clarify)
post #2 of 18
THE best way to make mashed potatoes! Use the smallest holes for extra-smooth purée, the biggest for ever-so-slightly chunky. Also great for mashing sweet potatoes/yams, because the stringy bits get captured.

And I have never tried, but you could probably use it to make spaetzl, too. Hmmm, think I just got myself a project for a dinner this week! :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #3 of 18
My mom used hers to make baby food from her own chicken soup. She ground the chicken and veggies, then added some broth. Having fed my youngest brother, I can tell you he ate that better than the commerical stuff!
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
thank you Suzanne and Mezzaluna for replying!

How does it work with chicken, did she end up with mashed chicken that doesn't through the holes, but is at least broken down? I'll give it a try and see what happens. I have to admit I've got cold feet having bought it. I like things to retain a bit of texture and my handheld mixer was not chopping evenly so I thought it was the best option.

I think I just need to practice more and develop some muscles!

If anyone else has ideas I'd love to keep hearing them.

Plum.
post #5 of 18
Use the mill to juice pomegranite seeds. Reduce to a thin sauce. Use the sauce to decorate dessert plates.
Whatshisname
Sean
Reply
Whatshisname
Sean
Reply
post #6 of 18
Another vote for mashed potatoes here!

;)
post #7 of 18
Yes, Plum, it was kind of like a paste or tiny bits. I recall she used it for the food just after the soupy stuff from jars- "junior foods" type of stuff.

Whatshisname, I like the idea with pomegranate seeds. I love the fruit, but the seeds are bothersome. It sounds like a great way to get the flavor without the pips.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #8 of 18
Does the mouli make better quality mashed potatos than the countertop Kenwood (or KA) mixer?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 18
I think so. You get a smoother "purée" quite quickly, especially if you use the smallest holes. When I do mashed potatoes in the mixer, I find it takes longer, they get colder, and I have to keep stopping the machine to push them down off the sides. And they're STILL kind of lumpy.

Also, with the food mill, you can just toss in chunks of butter and they'll get pushed through the holes and mix in evenly. It takes more physical effort, but I really like them better. Maybe it's just because that's how I always had to do them at work (with a HUGE food mill).
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #10 of 18
Okay, next question, if I may. Which brand food mill is recommended for domestic use only? For supper for, lets say, me and 3 other people.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 18
kokopuffs,

To add to Suzanne's comments, overworking the potatoes can rupture the cell walls which contributes to gummy, paste like potatoes.

A ricer or foodmill is much more gentle on the cells resulting in a light, fluffy consistency.

As for which food mill... How much money do you want to spend? There are plastic and stainless steel versions...

:)
post #12 of 18
Cchiu: stainless is preferred.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #13 of 18
kokopuffs,

Stainless steel food mills will run anywhere from about $25.00 to $200.00. Look for food mills with at least three interchangeable blades for different textures.

Take into consideration what you'll be making with it. Many people use food mills to make tomato sauce, apple sauce, fruit purees for jellies, baby food, and soups. For tomato sauce, make sure it has a blade fine enough for instance to keep out tomato seeds (a 1.5 to 2mm blade).

Other factors to consider: dishwasher safe, disassembles for storage and/or cleaning, sturdieness, volume (professional versions can mill a lot at a time).

Recommended Brands:
Cuisipro (about $70=$80)
Vittorio (sources anyone?)

Plum,

Browse here for recipes using food mills.

:)
post #14 of 18
I think Fine Cooking did a comparison of food mills in the not-too-distant past. Maybe they have something on their website?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #15 of 18
It appears that after some investigation, the Rosle brand selling for over $150 is the Hobart of food mills, meant for multiple heavy duty daily use. But the Rosle offers several different plates. Next in line is the Cusispro; but, does it offer more plates than the 3 that accompany it?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #16 of 18
I love mashed potatoes.I use a ricer to mash my potatoes, I like to add butter, a touch of cream, salt and pepper, and finally a sprinkling of chives. Comfort food at its best:smiles:
Regards
Dave
Reply
Regards
Dave
Reply
post #17 of 18
I use a ricer, too. And love to add swede to the potatoes before processing.
post #18 of 18
I also like, mashed potatoes mashed with parsnip, lovely flavour
Regards
Dave
Reply
Regards
Dave
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Equipment Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Equipment Reviews › Favourite uses for Food Mill / Mouli?