or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Prime Rib Process

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Our Thanksgiving prime rib was wonderful! My husband and I are both medium rare folks. At Christmas, we'll need to be on the less rare side of medium rare. So, was thinking about doing a bone-in beef roast using same method (but, instead of weight x 5 @ 500 degrees, rest in oven for 2 hours... X 6) thoughts? Want to test out getting it a little less rare before I do it on a fine piece of prime rib.
post #2 of 10

Two Christmases ago, when UPS got all backed up, we realized our customary country ham wasn't  arriving in time for Christmas. Our son went to a local fancy butcher and got a ten-pound USDA  prime bone-in prime rib roast.  He gave it a rub and cooked it in a smoker for about four hours to 140* and then put it in a 500* oven for a few minutes for a crust. Worked wonderfully.

 

Mike

travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachmom View Post............... (but, instead of weight x 5 @ 500 degrees, rest in oven for 2 hours... X 6) ...............

 

Can you please explain your "mathematical" notation as I don't understand it.  8)_

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 10

Your best friend is a meat thermometer.  The end slices are going to be a bit more cooked anyway.

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post
 

Your best friend is a meat thermometer.  The end slices are going to be a bit more cooked anyway.


Kuan, before the thermometer it was a metal skewer on the wrist to check the temp. I don't know about all this x4,x5 divided by the number of chairs at the table times the number of doors in the house. Cook the prime to 120 to 130 degree, let sit for 1/2 hr........The girth of the prime rib is what counts. You want to know how long it's going to get the center of the prime up to 120/130 making sure the ends and outside don't over cook. 

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachmom View Post............... (but, instead of weight x 5 @ 500 degrees, rest in oven for 2 hours... X 6) ...............

 

Can you please explain your "mathematical" notation as I don't understand it.  8)_

 

Just another way of timing a rib roast (does it work on anything else IDK?).

Preheat oven to 550 for a good hour then pop your room temp hunk o meat in and set timer for 5 min x weight of roast (in lbs).

When the timer dings turn off the oven and allow to rest (without opening oven door) for 2 hours.

I get a pretty consistent MR in the middle with a nice bark when following this technique.

 

mimi

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachmom View Post

Our Thanksgiving prime rib was wonderful! My husband and I are both medium rare folks. At Christmas, we'll need to be on the less rare side of medium rare. So, was thinking about doing a bone-in beef roast using same method (but, instead of weight x 5 @ 500 degrees, rest in oven for 2 hours... X 6) thoughts? Want to test out getting it a little less rare before I do it on a fine piece of prime rib.

 

If it would spell disaster use a thermometer....

 

mimi

post #8 of 10

@ChefBillyB The metal skewer was the way I was taught, I don't remember seeing many thermometers except in the pastry kitchen.

 

No way to "practice" on a lesser cut of meat with the width x girth plus add 20 minutes to the eta of your guests method.  Each piece of meat will cook differently. A ribeye will not be the same as roasting a piece of rump. Use a thermometer and enjoy your perfectly roasted roast.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 

 

Just another way of timing a rib roast (does it work on anything else IDK?).

Preheat oven to 550 for a good hour then pop your room temp hunk o meat in and set timer for 5 min x weight of roast (in lbs).

When the timer dings turn off the oven and allow to rest (without opening oven door) for 2 hours.

I get a pretty consistent MR in the middle with a nice bark when following this technique.

 

mimi


Many years ago Iived in a house with a 1950's vintage Chambers stove. Cooking with the gas turned off" was a Chambers trademark. It really worked!

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

@ChefBillyB The metal skewer was the way I was taught, I don't remember seeing many thermometers except in the pastry kitchen.

 

No way to "practice" on a lesser cut of meat with the width x girth plus add 20 minutes to the eta of your guests method.  Each piece of meat will cook differently. A ribeye will not be the same as roasting a piece of rump. Use a thermometer and enjoy your perfectly roasted roast.


Buba, my cooks always asked me how long should I cook this and that. My answer was always " Just until it's done" No longer......Different size pans, different ovens, nothing is the same. I never wanted them to take things for granite. I wanted them to control the item.......Buba did you ever pack a Prime Rib in salt and then break it to get to the prime ??????

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking