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Ration for Brining Chicken - Page 2

post #31 of 41

IDK all that much about designer salt other than color and crunch.

Actually the only time I use it is for a sprinkle on caramel.

There was an interesting thread going not too long ago.

 

mimi

post #32 of 41

Himalayan pink salt and flaky sea salts like Malden or French Sel Gris are really finishing salts. You are only going to be able to discern any flavor they have beyond basic saltiness is if their crystals are still crunchy.

post #33 of 41
I see the logic in that statement terry, but strangely enough the Himalayan salt I have on hand is finely grained. It has a very slight somewhat sweet minerality to it.

As for the cornish hen I made last night, it was good but slightly over salted by using table salt, more so to my roommate and a guest's palate. I used some indian spices this time which worked well with the brown sugar.

All in all, I think im going to give up brineing cornish hens in general. I had bought a 4 pack and roasted all with different prep techniques, brining doesn't seem to add much to a small bird compared to simpler seasoning techniques. Lessons learned, dinners served smile.gif
post #34 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrleansCookJ View Post

I see the logic in that statement terry, but strangely enough the Himalayan salt I have on hand is finely grained. It has a very slight somewhat sweet minerality to it.

As for the cornish hen I made last night, it was good but slightly over salted by using table salt, more so to my roommate and a guest's palate. I used some indian spices this time which worked well with the brown sugar.

All in all, I think im going to give up brineing cornish hens in general. I had bought a 4 pack and roasted all with different prep techniques, brining doesn't seem to add much to a small bird compared to simpler seasoning techniques. Lessons learned, dinners served smile.gif

Out of curiosity, how many salt are you adding per litre?

post #35 of 41
I'm using US measurement, 1/2 a cup to a quart of water, and a half a cup of brown sugar plus other spices. Was trying to make the closest conversion to chef steps recommendation, but I'm not sure if that was for kosher salt
post #36 of 41
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewOrleansCookJ View Post

I'm using US measurement, 1/2 a cup to a quart of water, and a half a cup of brown sugar plus other spices. Was trying to make the closest conversion to chef steps recommendation, but I'm not sure if that was for kosher salt

Well I am using chef steps measurements, 50g to 1ltr :) honestly I cooked it for my family and they usually always complain if food is "salty" but they didnt think it was salty and I brined it for 2 days !!

post #37 of 41

Whatever the size of the crystals finishing salts need to reside, more or less undissolved, on the surface of whatever you are eating for you to be able to perceive any flavor other than saltiness. 

post #38 of 41
.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Grima View Post

Well I am using chef steps measurements, 50g to 1ltr smile.gif honestly I cooked it for my family and they usually always complain if food is "salty" but they didnt think it was salty and I brined it for 2 days !!

Hmm... Kieth I think 2 factors yielded your results compared to mine. The size of the bird, mine were a pound or so, much less than a broiler chicken; and overnight or longer brining I believe is equilibrium brining, is much different than what I was trying to achieve in 2 - 3 hours. Then again my other tasters have much more sensitive palates being from central areas of the states rather than the south.
post #39 of 41

There is an excellent step by step with photos on how to brine in our articles section.

 

 

Basic Turkey Brining
By ChefTalk.com Posted 7362 views 5 comments

 

 

Dry Brining
By phatch Posted 2177 views 4 comments

 

 

A Brining We Shall Do
By kaneohegirlinaz Posted 391 views 5 comments
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #40 of 41
Thanks Nicko, those articles answered alot of questions I had about the science behind it. Outta poultry for now... considering the pork shoulder in the fridge for brining... maybe
post #41 of 41

Standard brine ratio is 20 parts water to 1 part salt by weight. Thus, whatever your water weight is, simply divide it by 20 to determine your salt weight.

 

For example, if you have 2384 grams of water you need 119 grams of salt. This ratio is predicated upon the fact that you are using kosher salt.

 

If you haven't brined before you can check out this site, http://www.gastro-grub.com/brining-chicken.html It provides a detailed description of brining as well as a step by step with pictures.

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