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Biscuit Grilled Cheese

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hello Everyone, I'm helping consult with a new restaurant and I've developed some great buttermilk biscuits for them as well as putting together a bunch of great dishes using the biscuits. (Like Sausage and Gravy biscuits, a version of rarebit biscuits and so forth...)  Anyway, one thing they asked about was a sort of grilled cheese biscuit. 

 

Now I like the idea, but my fear is the biscuit is too delicate to withstand being made into a grilled cheese, and I yet I need the cheese nice and melted and wonderful.  This place is more like a coffee shop, so there's not an endless amount of equipment we can utilize to make the sandwiches. 

 

And I don't want to put the cheese in the raw biscuit dough and bake it all up like that...

 

Any ideas on technique to make it work? I'm kind of at a wall on this one...

Deglazed
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post #2 of 10

Putting cheese in the dough is the most straightforward approach. But don't bake it. Take the traditional English Muffin approach and do it on the griddle or flat top. Two thin patties of dough is probably the simplest approach.  Lay a dough pattie down, top with cheese and whatever else is tempting, top with another dough pattie. You might pinch for a seal or not. Dealers choice. Might help to put a lid over it to retain heat and give it a bit of a "baking" rise. Flip and cook the top half through. 

 

Probably a good Hot Brown/Biscuits and Gravy hybrid concept could be made from these.  Making me think now. Instead of the Chicken Biscuit origin in chicken schmalz, make a biscuit from Turkey schmalz and bacon fat for the Hot Brown Hybrid

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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Those are some great ideas - thanks!

Deglazed
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post #4 of 10

Hey Matt, This place is in Portland, Oregon. It is my go to place on my way over to the coast. They do Great biscuits, fried chicken to die for. These are the pics of some of their biscuit sandwiches.

 

 

 

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks so much!  While some of those only fit the definition of "sandwich" the same way Cheesecake Factory serves "appetizers," I see what they're doing there to get the melted type cheese on there. They're using the heat of other items in the sandwich to do the melting for them - like the fried chicken and whatnot...  It still raises the question of how to melt just cheese, but this is a good set of ideas, and also shows the draw people have for a good biscuit sandwich!

Deglazed
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post #6 of 10

Matt, I posted those pics to give you a few other ideas. If you want to melt cheese on something you can get a cheese melter that is like a top broiler only not as hot. This will do the job, I had one.......It all depends on how many items you need to use it for.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

Very cool!  I didn't know such a thing even existed!  I think that might totally be the answer, but you're right, it depends on volume of course.  But thanks for the insight!

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post #8 of 10

Quote:

Originally Posted by MattFin View Post

 

 Anyway, one thing they asked about was a sort of grilled cheese biscuit. 

 

Now I like the idea, but my fear is the biscuit is too delicate to withstand being made into a grilled cheese.

 

 

I agree as well but you need to prove you showed up for the party lol.

 

Bear with me.....

To be classified as a true grilled cheese the sandwich needs to be assembled as so... 2 pieces of bread (biscuits) stuffed with a melty cheese and then browned in butter on both sides (hot enuf to melt said cheese).

 

Make up a few signature biscuits that are less in height and larger in circumference (large enuf to pick up with 2 hands) and way less fluffy.

Shred a couple or three cheeses with a low melting point and bind with a bit of grain mustard, a dash of onion powder and a touch of white pepper (classic mac and cheese flavors), stuff the biscuits...place on cooler area of grill and cover.

Grill until toasty brown and cheese oozes.

I would stay away from anything that oozes fat as it warms... not a pretty sight.

 

Either that big, heavy monstrosity of a biscuit will be an instant hit (never underestimate the lure of butter) or end up in the dish pit trash can and off of the menu.

 

Rename your rarebit to reflect the request.

British Grilled Cheese or whatever.

 

mimi

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Your idea is spot-on! And indeed, this is the way I would be doing this - if they had a grill (flattop) to use. But since it's a small coffee-shop type place, they don't have this kind of equipment to make it work. (I think a phase two thing might be to add one, but we'll see how things go for them!) 

 

And indeed, we'll not call the rarebit a "rarebit", as that makes no sense to the average US customer. I'm thinking using the phrase "smothered" somewhere in there might be a great idea though! :)

 

Thanks so much!

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post #10 of 10

I like the word smothered.

It invokes thoughts of plenty and from there a bit more $$ lol.

 

mimi

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