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Stew, Need opinion about temperature

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Guys, got a question but I have no clue if it makes sense or not so I am trying to get some opinions.

 

When I cook stews lets say Guinness Beef Stew, would you try to maintain the heat to stay below 65c? So that beef stays @ medium rare? or Would you simmer it and ignore the temperature?

post #2 of 15

No, it needs to be well done tender.  That means simmer just below boiling point.  The key is to not let the juices inside the beef boil or it will become dry and tough.

post #3 of 15

You don't want a medium rare stew.  This is something that I did when I was beginning to cook a few years ago.  I cooked a chuck roast stew until medium rare thinking it would be tender.  It was not.  And it was not a stew.

 

For a steak and ale stew It needs to simmer for a good 3 hours to become tender.  This is not about being well done or undercooked, you are cooking the meat slowly and gently in liquid (this is called braising) and the low heat and slow cooking help break down the tough fibers of the meat.  

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 15

Yes, stew and medium rare are mutually exclusive.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

Ok, I get what you are saying but I wanted to confirm if rapid boiling a stew or maintaining a low temperature makes a difference.

post #6 of 15

Like Kuan said.  Do not boil.  That will make meat tough.  Slow simmer for several hours is the way to go.  Fork tender goodness.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Grima View Post
 

Ok, I get what you are saying but I wanted to confirm if rapid boiling a stew or maintaining a low temperature makes a difference.

 

It sounds like you've never done this.  In that case I would like to suggest you use this recipe for steak and guinness stew.  It's easy and fool proof.  I like to use chuck for this instead of brisket. 

 

You can do the recipe as directed or you can stop once the meat is cooked and not add the cheese or move on to making it into a pie.

 

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/beef-recipes/steak-guinness-and-cheese-pie-with-a-puff-pastry-lid/#c96htrIj3ljXQ8gk.97

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post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

Kouk, I have cooked stew multiple times, I usually simmer it on low heat on the stove but occassionaly I cooked it in a closed pot in the oven @ 140c. So basically I was trying to figure out what difference there is between simmering on stove or cooked in the oven.

post #9 of 15
Oh wow that's not the question that came across at all lol. When anyone mentions rapid boiling when it comes to stew I automatically think of as a novice.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 15

At the risk of coming across snarky I throw my side towel in with @Koukouvagia .

Nowhere was I left to ponder the difference between the oven/stove top preparation of a stellar beef stew (be it a stout base or just a stock fortified with a good red wine).

 

But since you ask.....

The differences are as noted mainly mechanical.

Slow stovetop simmer needs almost undivided attention to maintain the heat source at a low enuf setting to ensure the characteristic fork tenderness of a good stew.

Bringing to a boil then slapping a lid on to finish in an oven at a lower set temp frees you up to sweep and mop the floor.... maybe even whip up a soda bread with which to mop up all of that glorious gravy.

 

Being a fan of the second style gives me a chance to use the fancy overpriced ceramic coated cast iron pot (in the Flame color choice if you are keeping score ;-) I was gifted when no one could decide what I wanted for a Christmas present.

 

mimi

post #11 of 15
@flipflopgirl I actually don't know what the technical reason for choosing stovetop vs oven cooking for a stew. I usually braise in the oven as it seems it cooks more evenly. The heat source surrounds the cooking vessel rather than directed to the bottom of he pot.

Either way one can enjoy a couple of hours of uninterrupted activities while it cooks.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 15

I use both methods.  Using the stove top with an open pot you can reduce the liquid easier.  The put in and leave it alone is a good way to go.  

Flipflop girl is that fancy overpriced ceramic coated cast iron pot leaching chemicals into your food?  I do not believe they are NSF approved. I'm not trying to be "snarky"  I just thought this is info to pass on.  I'm too old to worry about a few extra chemicals buy do think about the grand babies. .

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

I use both methods.  Using the stove top with an open pot you can reduce the liquid easier.  The put in and leave it alone is a good way to go.  

Flipflop girl is that fancy overpriced ceramic coated cast iron pot leaching chemicals into your food?  I do not believe they are NSF approved. I'm not trying to be "snarky"  I just thought this is info to pass on.  I'm too old to worry about a few extra chemicals buy do think about the grand babies. .


I do not know.

Big yes on the Grands so will have to check this out.

Thanks for the heads up.

 

mimi

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post

I use both methods.  Using the stove top with an open pot you can reduce the liquid easier.  The put in and leave it alone is a good way to go.  
Flipflop girl is that fancy overpriced ceramic coated cast iron pot leaching chemicals into your food?  I do not believe they are NSF approved. I'm not trying to be "snarky"  I just thought this is info to pass on.  I'm too old to worry about a few extra chemicals buy do think about the grand babies. .
That's a disturbing bit of information. Do you have anything to back this up with?

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post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimyra View Post
 

I use both methods.  Using the stove top with an open pot you can reduce the liquid easier.  The put in and leave it alone is a good way to go.  

Flipflop girl is that fancy overpriced ceramic coated cast iron pot leaching chemicals into your food?  I do not believe they are NSF approved. I'm not trying to be "snarky"  I just thought this is info to pass on.  I'm too old to worry about a few extra chemicals buy do think about the grand babies. .


I do not know.

Big yes on the Grands so will have to check this out.

Thanks for the heads up.

 

mimi

 

Sorry.....the pan is enamel not ceramic.

Funny tho...the fisherman has worked around ceramics for decades (guess that is where the hiccup came from) in a petrochemical support industry.

Used in the fuel filtration process, these specially made ceramic pieces are inert.

Altho I suppose if someone wanted to eat them it would be a different matter lol.

 

mimi

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